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Creamy Spinach and Artichoke Dip
Creamy Spinach and Artichoke Dip actually contains no cream at all and tastes cheesy without the dairy. This is a great healthy appetizer recipe that everyone can enjoy around the table. Creamy Spinach and Artichoke Dip is made with the obvious, spinach, artichokes, and pureed cashews, nutritional yeast, and delicious spices like garlic, cayenne, and onion. If you’ve been looking for another dip to make on the weekend to last you all week, then add this one to the list! On that list, you might already have our NS favorites, Cashew Kimchi Dip, the Sweet Onion Dip, or the popular Classic Cashew Cheese. These are all crowd pleasers meaning you can make them once to last you all week, feed a crowd, and know that everyone who likes creamy spinach and artichoke dip will love this recipe too. There’s a slight healthyish component to this recipe, the obvious being there’s no cheese here — cheese can be part of a healthy diet if tolerated well, it’s a source of fat — but why not add nutrients without sacrificing the texture or flavor? That’s where the two secret ingredients come in to make the texture of this dip a huge win! Cashews and steamed cauliflower are pureed in a blender (easy peasy) with spices and nutritional yeast to create an insanely creamy and cheesy flavor. Truly, this sauce can be used on your favorite pasta or drizzled over roasted vegetables. Cauliflower and cashews make this creamy spinach and artichoke dip so creamy, easy to make, easy to store and reheat, and a great way to sneak in a little more vegetables into the diets of your friends and family. Can’t use cashews? I get a lot of questions from our community about cashew allergies. Since cashews have one of the best flavors and textures for making up non-dairy dishes, that’s the preferred nut to use for this recipe. If you have an allergy, you can use hemp seeds instead and add about 1/2 cup in addition — the flavor will taste slightly more earthy and nutty, but the texture is still perfect! The post Creamy Spinach and Artichoke Dip appeared first on Nutrition Stripped. [...]
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Wasteful Zverev advances after five-set battle
MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Germany's Alexander Zverev wasted a flurry of opportunities before securing a 7-6(5) 6-4 5-7 6-7(6) 6-1 win over unseeded Frenchman Jeremy Chardy on Thursday to book a place in the Australian Open third round. [...]
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Netflix raised prices because you all are signing up like crazy     – CNET
The hikes were the first leg of a victory lap. Now 80 million households have watched Bird Box, too. [...]
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Chelsea transfer news: Gonzalo Higuain remains coy over future after AC Milan's defeat to Juventus
The Blues are reportedly close to bringing the striker in on loan until the end of the season [...]
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BBC executive rejects Premier League offer as search for Richard Scudamore successor continues
Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck is leading the search for a replacement after Scudamore brought an end to 19 years in charge [...]
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Want to buy ethical food? Scan with your phone for fast facts
Screengrab of OpenC website, launched by environmental group WWF and investment firm BCG Digital Ventures. KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 17 — Whether buying a fish fillet at a supermarket or ordering steak in a restaurant, consumers will soon be able to use their phones to check instantly whether their food is green and ethical.Launched by environmental group WWF and investment firm BCG Digital Ventures, OpenSC is a website that harnesses blockchain technology to allow users to scan a QR code on a product or menu that reveals the full history and supply chain before they buy.“For those catching and producing things in a very unsustainable way, it's quite easy for them to hide behind the complexity of supply chains,” said Paul Hunyor, Asia region head at BCG Digital Ventures in Sydney.“There is a lack of carrots for those doing good at the production end because it is very hard for them to make the end consumer aware of all the good work they're doing,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.Globally, consumers and retailers are demanding more information about what they procure, buy and eat, to ascertain that its production and transportation does not damage the environment, or use illegal and unethical business practices.In response, large consumer goods companies, restaurants and other businesses are looking at ways to attract more customers by offering sustainable products that are guaranteed as free of deforestation or slave labour, for example.The OpenSC platform, conceived in 2017 when WWF was piloting a tuna fisheries traceability project in the Pacific Ocean, will initially focus on fish and beef. It plans to expand in the next two years to cover other commodities like palm oil and timber.OpenSC allows consumers to cut through the complexity and lack of transparency in supply chains, said Hunyor.The digital tool will cover environmental, social and human rights, and hopes to attract sustainability bodies and schemes, as well as corporations and major commodities producers, said Dermot O'Gorman, CEO of WWF-Australia.“There is ... growing momentum around the world with corporates who are doing and want to do the right thing because their customers are increasing demand,” he said.Austral Fisheries, which is part of the Maruha Nichiro Group, has committed to implement OpenSC this year across its fleet which catches Patagonian toothfish.Customers and staff of supermarkets and restaurants, as well as wholesalers, can use the tool to access instant information.For fish, that would include where it was caught, if the area is a verified sustainable fishing zone, and conditions along the supply chain.Fish tracked by OpenSC, set up as a social enterprise, will be served at a dinner for world leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos next week. — Reuters [...]
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Paris Men's Fashion Week: Elegance, nonchalance feature on second day
Streetwear is still very much part of Off-White's DNA, the label also presented more classic looks with plenty of suits in a wide range of colours in Paris, January 16, 2019. — AFP pic PARIS, Jan 18 — The second day of Paris Fashion Week Men's was marked by much-anticipated shows for Virgil Abloh's Off-White label, the Raf Simons brand, and the Walter Van Beirendonck fashion house.On the catwalks were 2019-2020 fall-winter collections featuring extensive volumes, Parisian chic, prints, an enduring sportswear spirit, and some streetwear looks.JW Anderson, who has opted to present in Paris rather than London this season, caused a sensation on the second day with an ultramodern mixed show. Voluminous coats and shirts, juxtaposing a wide range of materials and prints, dominated this latest collection, which also featured animal-skin print knee socks.     View this post on Instagram         LOOK 4 AW19 | PARIS @jonathan.anderson @benjaminbruno_ @michelgaubert @ashleybrokaw @anthonyturnerhair @lynseyalexander #JWANDERSON #JWAAW19A post shared by JW ANDERSON (@jw_anderson) onJan 16, 2019 at 12:00pm PSTMen's Fashion Week continued yesterday with shows by Rick Owens, Yohji Yamamoto, Vetements, and, of course, Louis Vuitton. — AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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MITI to speed up new car pricing approval
KUALA LUMPUR (Bernama): The Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) says it will expedite the approval of incentives for the pricing of new car models. [...]
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What to do at the Trick Art Museum at i-City, Shah Alam
Trick art or trompe-l’oeil (literally, to deceive the eyes, in French) has been around for years. It is an art technique that uses realistic two-dimensional images to create optical illusions that make a painting seem three dimensional. There are many trick art museums around the world like in Thailand, Singapore, South Korea, Japan and France. The Trick Art Museum at i-City in Shah Alam, Selangor is the first of its kind in Malaysia, according to the Malaysia Book of Records. Today, other such museums also exist in Penang, Perak, Melaka and Johor. The fairly small space at the Trick Art Museum at i-City yields a selection of artworks with six themes: Famous Masterpieces, Egyptian Lost Tomb Adventure, Modern Classics, Animal Kingdom, Marine Life and Super Heroes. Why you should go If you have some spare time and want to take some funny photos with your family or friends, then check out this place. It is a child-friendly space that’s entertaining for the young and old. It is also a fun museum to just spend time with your friends. What to do Most of the art pieces painted on the walls are created just so that visitors can strike funny poses with them. You will look as if you’re inside the artwork and part of the picture! So, here’s your chance to be creative when taking pictures. If you run out of ideas or just can’t figure out how to pose with a particular artwork, don’t worry. There are snapshots of suggested poses posted next to each item that you can refer to. Who will like it Families with young children would enjoy visiting the Trick Art Museum. You can also teach your kids about perspective and creativity during this time. If you enjoy taking photos or being photographed, you would probably love this place too. Getting there The Trick Eye Museum is located in the i-City entertainment theme park in Shah Alam. If you’re taking public transport, the nearest KTM station is at Padang Jawa, so you have to take a Grab or a taxi from there to i-City. It is open from 11am until midnight. Trick Art Museum @ i-City Address: 2-48, Jalan Plumbum 7/103, Seksyen 7, 40000 Shah Alam, Selangor Tel: 03-5521 8800 [...]
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Celebrity chef David Rocco is coming to KL
David Rocco is a name that avid foodies will recognise. The Italian celebrity chef and food personality is a known figure on the food circuit, having helmed the hit TV show David Rocco’s La Dolce Vita, which has aired in over 150 countries. Rocco has also starred in the equally popular David Rocco’s Dolce India, and published a number of cookbooks including the award-winning David Rocco’s Dolce Vita and Made In Italy. If you’ve been following Rocco’s culinary adventures on screen, mesmerised by both his charming personality as well as the food he whips up, you’ll be excited to discover that he will be coming to our own neck of the woods on Monday, Jan 21. In an event titled “An Evening With David Rocco”, the man himself will be at Sheraton Petaling Jaya between 5pm and 7pm to talk about his television experience as well as answer questions from fans. Tickets for the event are priced at RM199 and RM499, available on www.ticket2u.com.my. [...]
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That time I couldn’t take my sports bra off
My shoulder is sore. Not from doing heavy duty exercise, but from trying to put on a sports bra. That’s right – danger lurks in a seemingly innocent piece of undergarment and can cause a lot of distress! Back then (yes, I’m ancient), sports bras came in “cupless” styles and were cheap, though they didn’t provide much support. The surface was flat with no cups and a narrow elastic band at the bottom was meant to hold the boobs in place. Or, they’d come with a built-in shelf bra. As manufacturers improved their products, they introduced sports bras in a variety of designs and materials. Branded ones are not cheap (they cost more than RM250) because they promise a lot of things – a light material that wicks sweat and dries quickly; different support for varying intensity levels; ultra-tight compression ones that fit like second skin, especially catered for high-intensity sports; soft, breathable and removable cups that provide extra structure and coverage; and superior bounce control, racer back, scoop back or T-back styling, among others. Granted, they are superior in comfort once you wear them; but they still leave a hole in your pocket, and in my case, lots of heat rubs and anti-inflammatory gels. I’m not exactly well-endowed, so I tend to go for the hookless ones that can be pulled over the head. I never had problems putting on and yanking them off before. If I’m dancing or doing floor rolls and somersaults, the seamlessness is easier on my back as there are no hooks to irritate my skin or cause abrasions. Problems undressing So, over Christmas, I splurged on some branded athletic wear. It was a compression-styled one, which squashes the breasts close to the chest to minimise motion. Like I mentioned, I’m small so I don’t really need compression tops, but I liked the trendy design and opted for them. The sports bras didn’t seem that difficult to remove when I tried them at the store. Perhaps I was calmer then and not rushing for class. Anyway, last week, it took me 20 minutes to put it on, and midway through, I started perspiring from fatigue. The right sports bra should have a band that fits snugly around your rib cage. — AP I couldn’t take it off or pull it down, and no one was home to help! Arms dangling helplessly, I felt defeated and wondered what to do before mustering all my strength to finally pull it down. I was late for class while my shoulder screamed in pain – thankfully, I didn’t dislocate it. Another gym buddy had to help peel it off after a sweaty workout, and in the locker room was when I realised many women face the same problem. So many of the ladies were helping each other remove undergarments, especially compression tops and bottoms. One lady even told me she suffered a rotator cuff tear trying to remove her bra! I’ve always been told that a sports bra with a good support is essential to prevent discomfort and breast pain. You don’t want to suffer from tissue damage that might lead to stretch marks and sagging. In my varsity days, as a dancer in training, no student was allowed to wear a sports bra under her leotard. The body lines had to be visible and unobstructed at all times, especially in ballet classes. Because a vast majority of dancers are small-chested, this isn’t a problem, especially since most leotards come with a full lining inside. The top-heavy ones would have to wear an extra leotard camisole for added support, and/or a nipple sticker. But now I realise that even the smallest breasts can experience permanent dama-ge to connective tissue over time if you neglect to give them the right support. Separate support Experts recommend that women wear an encapsulation-style sports bra (i.e. those with separate cups) over the uniboob compression kind. As breast tissue moves in a figure-of-eight pattern when you run, walk or jump, using a bra with cups will support you better. And from my experience, stick to the ones with adjustable hooks and straps. Traditional bras have hook closures at the front or back, which makes taking a bra on and off a lot easier, saving you a lot of agony. The right sports bra should have a band that fits snugly around your rib cage, but not too tight. If you can fit two fingers between your body and the band (but not more) that’s the sign of a good fit. Wider bands tend to be more supportive than narrow bands. Shoulder straps should feel secure and provide minimal stretch to reduce up-and-down movement. Weight fluctuations, childbirth and menopause can all affect the size of your breasts, so your next bra will not necessarily be the same size as your current bra. Studies have found that 70% of women do not know their proper bra size. This can be detrimental for those playing sports, because when it comes to sports bras, size does matter and an ill-fitting bra can result in chafing, upper back and neck strain, and droopy boobs. So, protect your front assets and your limbs by getting a sports bra that can be speedily worn and removed. Revathi Murugappan is a certified fitness trainer who tries to battle gravity and continues to dance to express herself artistically and nourish her soul. [...]
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Arsenal transfer news: Guillem Balague provides positive update after Unai Emery comments
UNAI EMERY will have money to spend in the summer to improve his Arsenal side. [...]
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Guan Eng: Pahang govt finding it hard to develop Cameron Highlands due to debts to Putrajaya
Lim said that only the Federal Government under Pakatan Harapan would be able to safeguard the welfare of the people and to provide continuous development in the area. ― Picture by Sayuti Zainudin KUALA LIPIS, Jan 18 ― The Pahang government under the leadership of the Barisan Nasional (BN) is finding it hard to help voters in the parliamentary constituency of Cameron Highlands because it owes debts amounting to RM3.1 billion to the federal government.DAP secretary-general Lim Guan Eng said the voters in the constituency, especially the Orang Asli, have to give their confidence and mandate to the candidate Pakatan Harapan (PH) M. Manogaran at the by-election on Jan 26.Lim said that only the Federal Government under Pakatan Harapan would be able to safeguard the welfare of the people and to provide continuous development in the area, he told a gathering which was attended by PKR president Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim, Pahang PKR chairman Fuziah Salleh, Senator  Bob Manolan Mohamad and Manogaran.“It’s okay, we can work with the state government if PH won in Cameron Highlands. We can work together with Pahang Mentri Besar (Datuk Seri Wan Rosdy Wan Ismail) to build Cameron Highlands (Parliament).Meanwhile, Lim told the Orang Asli community not to believe claims that the government would stop the allowances and other facilities in the future as alleged by the opposition.The area has 32,048 voters or 22 per cent from the Orang Asli community, Malays (34 per cent) Chinese (30 per cent) and Indians (14 per cent)The by-election is a four-cornered contest involving PH candidate Manogaran, Ramli Mohd Nor from BN and two independent candidates, Sallehudin Ab Talib and Wong Seng Yee. ― Bernama [...]
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Tengku Permaisuri Selangor says satisfied with jailing of laundry cat killer
A. Mohanraj (second left) leave the Selayang Sessions Court October 16, 2018. — Bernama pic SHAH ALAM, Jan 18 ― Tengku Permaisuri Selangor, Tengku Permaisuri Norashikin, said she was relieved and satisfied with the Selayang Sessions Court decision to jail the individual who caused the death of a pregnant cat at a launderette in Gombak last year.Tengku Permaisuri Norashikin who is the Royal Patron of the Selangor Stray Free Campaign said that at the same time she was saddened that there were still some incidents involving cruelty to animals such as kittens trampled to death, as well as the poisoning and burning of dogs."The Animal Welfare Act 2015 has clearly provided that a fine of RM20,000 to RM100,000 and/or imprisonment of up to 3 years be imposed on anyone who commits cruelty to animals."I am appealing to all Malaysians to be compassionate towards abandoned animals who cannot defend themselves," she said in a statement uploaded in the facebook of the Selangor Royal Office.She also urged the Department of Veterinary Services and also local authoritieis throughout the country to take proactive action in promoting ‘caring and compassionate communities' by educating pet owners to be responsible. The Sessions Court had sentenced taxi driver A. Mohanraj to two years jail after he decided to plead guilty today.Judge Rasyhihah Ghazali ordered the jail sentence to be carried out from the date of Mohanraj's arrest on Sept 14, 2018. ― Bernama [...]
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Is This Really The End Of The Influencer?
Marketers are forever claiming that the age of the influencer is over, but is it really? We spoke to three industry experts who say the movement is only just getting started [...]
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Less Beef and More Beans. Report Recommends a New Diet for Planetary Health
(NEW YORK) — A hamburger a week, but no more — that’s about as much red meat people should eat to do what’s best for their health and the planet, according to a report seeking to overhaul the world’s diet. Eggs should be limited to fewer than about four a week, the report says. Dairy foods should be about a serving a day, or less. The report from a panel of nutrition, agriculture and environmental experts recommends a plant-based diet, based on previously published studies that have linked red meat to increased risk of health problems. It also comes amid recent studies of how eating habits affect the environment. Producing red meat takes up land and feed to raise cattle, which also emit the greenhouse gas methane. John Ioannidis, chair of disease prevention at Stanford University, said he welcomed the growing attention to how diets affect the environment, but that the report’s recommendations do not reflect the level of scientific uncertainties around nutrition and health. “The evidence is not as strong as it seems to be,” Ioannidis said. The report was organized by EAT, a Stockholm-based nonprofit seeking to improve the food system, and published Wednesday by the medical journal Lancet. The panel of experts who wrote it says a “Great Food Transformation” is urgently needed by 2050, and that the optimal diet they outline is flexible enough to accommodate food cultures around the world. Overall, the diet encourages whole grains, beans, fruits and most vegetables, and says to limit added sugars, refined grains such as white rice and starches like potatoes and cassava. It says red meat consumption on average needs to be slashed by half globally, though the necessary changes vary by region and reductions would need to be more dramatic in richer countries like the United States. Convincing people to limit meat, cheese and eggs won’t be easy, however, particularly in places where those foods are a notable part of culture. In Sao Paulo, Brazil, systems analyst Cleberson Bernardes said as he was leaving a barbecue restaurant that limiting himself to just one serving of red meat a week would be “ridiculous.” In Berlin, Germany, craftsman Erik Langguth said there are better ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and dismissed the suggestion that the world needs to cut back on meat. “If it hasn’t got meat, it’s not a proper meal,” said Langguth, who is from a region known for its bratwurst sausages. Before even factoring in the environmental implications, the report sought to sketch out what the healthiest diet for people would look like, said Walter Willett, one of its authors and a nutrition researcher at Harvard University. While eggs are no longer thought to increase risk of heart disease, Willett said the report recommends limiting them because studies indicate a breakfast of whole grains, nuts and fruit would be healthier. He said everybody doesn’t need to become a vegan, and that many are already limiting how much meat they eat. “Think of it like lobster — something that I really like, but have a few times a year,” Willett said. Advice to limit red meat is not new, and is tied to its saturated fat content, which is also found in cheese, milk, nuts and packaged foods with coconut and palm kernel oils. The report notes most evidence on diet and health is from Europe and the United States. In Asian countries, a large analysis found eating poultry and red meat (mostly pork) was associated with improved lifespans. That might be in part because people might eat smaller amounts of meat in those countries, the report says. Ioannidis of Stanford noted nutrition research is often based on observational links between diet and health, and that some past associations have not been validated. Dietary cholesterol, for example, is no longer believed to be strongly linked to blood cholesterol. The meat and dairy industries also dispute the report’s recommendations, saying their products deliver important nutrients and can be part of healthy diets. Andrew Mente, a nutrition epidemiology researcher at McMaster University, urged caution before making widespread dietary recommendations, which he said could have unintended consequences. Still, the EAT-Lancet report’s authors say the overall body of evidence strongly supports reducing red meat for optimal health and shifting toward plant-based diets. They note the recommendations are compatible with the U.S. dietary guidelines, which say to limit saturated fat to 10 percent of calories. While people in some poorer counties may benefit from getting more of the nutrients in meat and dairy products, the report says they shouldn’t follow the path of richer countries in how much of those foods they eat in coming years. Though estimates vary, a report by the United Nations said livestock is responsible for about 15 percent of the world’s gas emissions that warm the climate. Robbie Andrew, a senior researcher at CICERO Center for International Climate Research in Norway, said farming practices that make animals grow faster and bigger may help limit emissions. But he said cows and other ruminant animals nevertheless produce a lot of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. “It’s very difficult to get down these natural emissions that are part of their biology,” Andrew said. The environmental benefits of giving up red meat depend on what people eat in its place. Chicken and pork produce far fewer emissions than beef, Andrew said, adding that plants in general have among the smallest carbon footprints. Brent Loken, an author of the EAT-Lancet report, said the report lays out the parameters of an optimal diet, but acknowledged the challenge in figuring out how to work with policy makers, food companies and others in tailoring and implementing it in different regions. [...]
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