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Hendri Take’s journey from shy boy to yoga teacher
Wherever Hendri Take goes, people do a double take. His boyish good looks, ultra-clear complexion and beautiful, serene smile are a magnet for the fairer sex. So, it’s hard to believe that he used to be a painfully shy guy. So shy that he couldn’t open his mouth around strangers. Saying hello was an ordeal. He’d just smile and let others do the talking. In front of a room full of people, he’d freeze, hoping the earth would swallow him. But Hendri knew he had to overcome this self-consciousness to prosper in life so, while most school-leavers would choose to pursue an undergraduate course of their choice, he decided to study public relations in university. “That’s really how I learnt how to speak to people. I’m still shy but a lot better,” says the soft-spoken 33-year-old Indonesian yoga practitioner and entrepreneur. While in university, he scheduled all his classes in the mornings and evenings, thus had plenty of spare time in the afternoons. Not knowing how to kill time and not a social butterfly, he grew restless until a friend asked him to accompany him for a yoga class. “I was curious to find out what yoga was all about so I tagged along. The instructor kept looking at me because of my improper attire – I was wearing jeans! I was never a flexible guy though I was fit and played lots of sports such as badminton, karate, baseball and tennis. But my body was extremely hard and I couldn’t even touch my toes! After the first class, I was able to breathe better and slept like a baby,” shares Hendri. There’s an aura of peace around yoga teacher. Photo: Hendri Take He then took further classes, fell in love with yoga and obtained his teaching certification, though he had no plans to teach. The thought of standing in front of a class terrified him. “I was the most improved student due to my good body awareness,” he says, grinning. “But I was still shy and it took me some time to build my confidence to teach. My instructors encouraged me.” The initial years were challenging but as Hendri got more comfortable speaking, students started to flock to his classes. Now, he’s in demand all over Jakarta for his teaching skills. Backbends are one of Hendris strengths. Hendri was in Kuching, Sarawak, recently to conduct a yoga retreat in conjunction with the Rainforest Fringe Festival. He was one of two instructors, along with former MTV Asia VJ Denise Keller, who led the three-day event. The duo took their motley crew of roughly 20 participants through a series of sweaty beginner to intermediate yoga asanas (postures) against the backdrop of Mount Santubong, facing the South China Sea. He says, “Now, in addition to teaching about 10 hours a week, I practise yoga daily to release the ‘locks’ from my other exercises.” In 2015, Hendri clinched top prize in the Influence Asia Awards (Singapore) in the health and fitness category. Today, he is one of the brand ambassadors for Adidas Indonesia, among other outfits. Hendri putting the yoga retreat participants through the paces in his class, at the recent Rainforest Fringe Festival. Photo: Under Armour The themes of Hendri’s classes are Catching Fire and Grow The Strength. His sweat-inducing classes are designed to build the fundamental foundational strength and engagement necessary to go upside-down while improving arm balances and inversions. When Hendri is not teaching, he concentrates on his family business dealing with wholesale clothing. “I take care of one outlet while my two brothers take care of the rest. I have to admit they don’t support my yoga teaching as they don’t think it’s going to get me far,” he confesses. “No one else does yoga in my family because they are all too busy making money!” Hendri also runs his own online jamu business called ja’he. Jamu is Indonesia’s traditional herbal medicine made of plants and spices such as ginger, turmeric, cloves, fennel, celery and tamarind. Proponents consume it to maintain good health and prevent diseases. Jamu is produced in the form of tablets, capsules, sachets or bottled drinks. Hendri’s strength lies in arm balances and backbends. Hendri grew up drinking jamu, which explains his smooth complexion. “As a child, my grandmother always gave me jamu to drink. My mother died when I was very young so my grandmother brought us up. I learnt the recipes from her. She would ask me to buy the ingredients from the market so I’d dash out and get them. Along the way, I also learnt some other recipes, and would prepare breakfast for the family. There are six different types of jamu but I can also customise the concoction for people,” he reveals. While he enjoys cooking and yoga, Hendri finds that yoga gives him more gratification. And peace. He says, “Believe it or not, being a yoga practitioner and running a business at the same time is a big challenge. After dabbling in it for a few years, I can now confirm that yoga is more than a form of exercise. It’s a form of healing and stress relief,” reckons Hendri, whose strength lies in arm balances and backbends. As for his strange surname Take, it has stuck since his secondary school days. Hendri bears an uncanny resemblance to Taiwanese–Japanese actor and singer, Takeshi Kaneshiro. The girls would refer to him as Take and when they found out his first name was Hendri, he became known as Hendri Take instead. It sounded unique so Hendri continues using it. But ladies, sorry, though Hendri is still single, he’s taken. This is what attracts the ladies. [...]
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[Discussion] Home Remedies For Acne Scars. Back To Being Beautiful Again!
submitted by /u/ransomevans800 [link] [comments] [...]
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Medical News Today: What are the best foods to eat for energy?
Foods and drinks fuel the body. Energy-boosting examples include bananas, avocados, apples, and coffee. Learn more about the best things to eat and drink for energy here. [...]
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Do you really understand diabetes? Over 370 million people have it
Diabetes: Let’s consider that this disease affects approximately 370 million people worldwide and many people across the globe remain undiagnosed. There are definitely some misconstrued ideas when it comes to the condition so we are here to set a few things straight. What is Diabetes? When blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels rise after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin then lowers blood glucose to keep it in the normal range. Diabetes occurs when your blood glucose or blood sugar (our main source of energy derived from our food) is too high. In order to convert glucose into energy we need the hormone Insulin which is produced by the pancreas. If, over time, this process doesn’t occur effectively and the glucose remains in the blood (rather than being utilised by our cells), it can cause health problems. Diabetes is serious and can not be ‘cured’ per say, however it can be managed and a healthy life may be enjoyed. Types of Diabetes Type 1: This indicates that you are incapable of making insulin naturally. This happens when the immune system prevents the pancreas from producing insulin. Most people with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily in order to survive. This can be diagnosed at any age but is more common in children and young adults. This is far more rare than Type 2. Type 2: This indicates that you are capable of producing insulin but your body doesn’t use the insulin properly or doesn’t make sufficient amounts. This type is more commonly diagnosed in middle-age to older people and the most common type. You are more likely to develop this aged 45 or over, if it runs in the family and if you are overweight. High blood pressure, low HDL cholesterol, high level of triglycerides, being physically inactive, having a history of heart disease or stroke, suffering from depression, having polycystic ovary syndrome, having ‘acanthuses nigricans’ (dark, thick, velvety skin around the neck or armpits), pre-diabetes (when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes), and gestational diabetes all contribute to the likelihood of someone developing Type 2 diabetes. This is possible to manage without medication but often requires medicine to control blood glucose levels. A healthy lifestyle is a key tool in managing Type 2. Gestational: This type can develop in during pregnancy and many times goes away once the baby is born. Once you have had gestational diabetes it raises your chances of developing Type 2 later in life. On occasion it is actually Type 2 rather than gestational during the pregnancy. Again, this is manageable without medication but your blood glucose levels and blood pressure and cholesterol need to be strictly managed and monitored at all times. There are medicines available if this is not possible. Other Types: One other type is an inherited form named Monogenic Diabetes, another is related to having cystic fibrosis. Health Issues caused by Diabetes High blood sugar can lead to the following health issues if left untreated; Heart disease Stroke Kidney disease Eye dysfunction Dental problems Nerve damage Foot problems Symptoms: how to recognise when you have diabetes Some symptoms that are easily noticeable are; Increased thirst and urinating often Increased hunger Fatigue Blurred vision Numbness in the extremities Non-healing sores Unexplained weight-loss. All too often the symptoms go unnoticed or are actually unnoticeable and many people remain undiagnosed until further, related illnesses occur. Causes of Diabetes Type 1: The onset of Type 1 can occur rapidly, in a matter of weeks, and does so when your immune system decides to attack and destroy the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. It is believed that the reasons for this are genetic and environmental, such as a virus, although scientists are still studying the disease to try and confirm the causes. Type 2: The onset of Type 2 can occur far more gradually, the symptoms may be so mild that they go unnoticed, symptoms may not even develop at all and the diagnosis may be given much later when discovering a person has diabetes-related health problems. It is generally caused by unhealthy lifestyle habits and genetics. You are more likely to develop Type 2 if you are overweight or obese. This can cause insulin resistance (a condition where muscle, liver and fat cells do not use insulin properly) which means the body requires extra insulin in order to help glucose enter cells, reducing the blood sugar levels to normal. Gestational: This is caused by a combination of factors; lifestyle, genetics and hormonal changes during pregnancy. These hormones are produced by the placenta and contribute to insulin resistance, this occurs in every pregnancy. However, some are able to produce sufficient insulin to overcome the resistance, those who are not and whose pancreases can’t provide enough insulin develop gestational diabetes. Weight gain is also a link to gestational diabetes, as with Type 2 diabetes, if the woman is already overweight they may already have insulin resistance and so the pregnancy will spike this. Studies show that genetics do have a role, and that family history of gestational diabetes makes the odds more likely. Genetics also becomes an apparent factor when you take into account that diabetes occurs more often in certain racial groups. Other Causes: Genetic Mutations: Monogenic Diabetes, Cystic Fibrosis, and Hemochromatosis can cause diabetes as all damage the pancreas and its ability to function effectively. Hormonal Diseases: Cushing’s Syndrome, Acromegaly, Hyperthyroidism all encourage the body to over-produce certain hormones which can then cause insulin resistance and diabetes. Pancreatic Damage or removal can result in diabetes as the beta cells necessary to produce insulin are either reduced, damaged or lacking. Medicinal Side Effects: certain medicines can prevent insulin from wo [...]
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Do you really understand diabetes? Over 370 million people have it
Diabetes: Let’s consider that this disease affects approximately 370 million people worldwide and many people across the globe remain undiagnosed. There are definitely some misconstrued ideas when it comes to the condition so we are here to set a few things straight. What is Diabetes? When blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels rise after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin then lowers blood glucose to keep it in the normal range. Diabetes occurs when your blood glucose or blood sugar (our main source of energy derived from our food) is too high. In order to convert glucose into energy we need the hormone Insulin which is produced by the pancreas. If, over time, this process doesn’t occur effectively and the glucose remains in the blood (rather than being utilised by our cells), it can cause health problems. Diabetes is serious and can not be ‘cured’ per say, however it can be managed and a healthy life may be enjoyed. Types of Diabetes Type 1: This indicates that you are incapable of making insulin naturally. This happens when the immune system prevents the pancreas from producing insulin. Most people with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily in order to survive. This can be diagnosed at any age but is more common in children and young adults. This is far more rare than Type 2. Type 2: This indicates that you are capable of producing insulin but your body doesn’t use the insulin properly or doesn’t make sufficient amounts. This type is more commonly diagnosed in middle-age to older people and the most common type. You are more likely to develop this aged 45 or over, if it runs in the family and if you are overweight. High blood pressure, low HDL cholesterol, high level of triglycerides, being physically inactive, having a history of heart disease or stroke, suffering from depression, having polycystic ovary syndrome, having ‘acanthuses nigricans’ (dark, thick, velvety skin around the neck or armpits), pre-diabetes (when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes), and gestational diabetes all contribute to the likelihood of someone developing Type 2 diabetes. This is possible to manage without medication but often requires medicine to control blood glucose levels. A healthy lifestyle is a key tool in managing Type 2. Gestational: This type can develop in during pregnancy and many times goes away once the baby is born. Once you have had gestational diabetes it raises your chances of developing Type 2 later in life. On occasion it is actually Type 2 rather than gestational during the pregnancy. Again, this is manageable without medication but your blood glucose levels and blood pressure and cholesterol need to be strictly managed and monitored at all times. There are medicines available if this is not possible. Other Types: One other type is an inherited form named Monogenic Diabetes, another is related to having cystic fibrosis. Health Issues caused by Diabetes High blood sugar can lead to the following health issues if left untreated; Heart disease Stroke Kidney disease Eye dysfunction Dental problems Nerve damage Foot problems Symptoms: how to recognise when you have diabetes Some symptoms that are easily noticeable are; Increased thirst and urinating often Increased hunger Fatigue Blurred vision Numbness in the extremities Non-healing sores Unexplained weight-loss. All too often the symptoms go unnoticed or are actually unnoticeable and many people remain undiagnosed until further, related illnesses occur. Causes of Diabetes Type 1: The onset of Type 1 can occur rapidly, in a matter of weeks, and does so when your immune system decides to attack and destroy the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. It is believed that the reasons for this are genetic and environmental, such as a virus, although scientists are still studying the disease to try and confirm the causes. Type 2: The onset of Type 2 can occur far more gradually, the symptoms may be so mild that they go unnoticed, symptoms may not even develop at all and the diagnosis may be given much later when discovering a person has diabetes-related health problems. It is generally caused by unhealthy lifestyle habits and genetics. You are more likely to develop Type 2 if you are overweight or obese. This can cause insulin resistance (a condition where muscle, liver and fat cells do not use insulin properly) which means the body requires extra insulin in order to help glucose enter cells, reducing the blood sugar levels to normal. Gestational: This is caused by a combination of factors; lifestyle, genetics and hormonal changes during pregnancy. These hormones are produced by the placenta and contribute to insulin resistance, this occurs in every pregnancy. However, some are able to produce sufficient insulin to overcome the resistance, those who are not and whose pancreases can’t provide enough insulin develop gestational diabetes. Weight gain is also a link to gestational diabetes, as with Type 2 diabetes, if the woman is already overweight they may already have insulin resistance and so the pregnancy will spike this. Studies show that genetics do have a role, and that family history of gestational diabetes makes the odds more likely. Genetics also becomes an apparent factor when you take into account that diabetes occurs more often in certain racial groups. Other Causes: Genetic Mutations: Monogenic Diabetes, Cystic Fibrosis, and Hemochromatosis can cause diabetes as all damage the pancreas and its ability to function effectively. Hormonal Diseases: Cushing’s Syndrome, Acromegaly, Hyperthyroidism all encourage the body to over-produce certain hormones which can then cause insulin resistance and diabetes. Pancreatic Damage or removal can result in diabetes as the beta cells necessary to produce insulin are either reduced, damaged or lacking. Medicinal Side Effects: certain medicines can prevent insulin from wo [...]
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Medical News Today: Herpes simplex: Everything you need to know
Herpes simplex is a very common virus that affects billions of people globally. It can cause sores around the mouth or on the genitals and surrounding areas. Learn more about herpes simplex here. [...]
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Orange juice, leafy greens and fruit could be good for a man’s memory
NEW US research has found that men who include vegetables and leafy greens, orange juice, and fruit in their diet may benefit from a lower risk of memory loss as they age. Carried out by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, the new large-scale study looked at 27,842 men with an average age of 51. Participants were asked to complete questionnaires about how many servings of fruits, vegetables and other foods they had each day at the start of the study, and then again every four years for 20 years. They were then categorised into groups depending on their fruit and vegetable intake. The group who ate the highest amount of vegetables ate around six servings per day, compared to around two servings for the lowest group. For fruits, the highest group ate about three servings per day, compared to half a serving for the bottom group. A serving of fruit is defined as one cup of fruit or ½ cup of fruit juice, and a serving of vegetables is considered to be one cup of raw vegetables or two cups of leafy greens. The researchers also tested the participants’ thinking and memory skills at least four years before the end of the study, when they the average age of the group was 73. The findings, published in the journal Neurology, showed that people who ate larger amounts of fruits and vegetables at the start of the study were less likely to develop thinking and memory problems later in life, even if they were not eating larger amounts around six years before the memory test. In addition, the team also found that the men who ate the most vegetables were 34% less likely to develop poor thinking skills than men who consumed the least amount of vegetables, while the men who drank orange juice every day were 47% less likely to develop poor thinking skills than men who drank less than one serving per month. The men who ate the most fruit each day were also less likely to see a decline in their thinking skills, but the researchers found that this association was weakened after taking into account other dietary factors that could affect the results, such as consumption of vegetables, fruit juice, refined grains, legumes and dairy products. “One of the most important factors in this study is that we were able to research and track such a large group of men over a 20-year period of time, allowing for very telling results,” said study author Changzheng Yuan, ScD. “Our studies provide further evidence dietary choices can be important to maintain your brain health.” However, the researchers pointed out that the study does not show cause and effect, only that there is a relationship between eating fruits and vegetables and drinking orange juice and a reduction of memory loss. – AFP Relaxnews [...]
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An asymmetrical jaw can cause a lot of problems
Do your upper and lower teeth meet perfectly when you close your mouth? If they do, it’s thanks to the correct alignment of your jaws. However, there are those whose jaws are naturally misaligned. This can result not only in difficulties in eating and speaking, but also negatively affect their looks. Fortunately, this jaw malalignment can be treated with a combination of braces and jaw surgery, or in medical lingo, orthognathic surgery. Orthognathic surgery or corrective jaw surgery is a method of treatment that may be advised for patients who have severe jaw size problems, including asymmetry. This discrepancy of the jaw bones often results in severe malocclusion (wrong bite) and treatment with normal braces alone will not be adequate to achieve a good functional bite with pleasing dental and facial aesthetics. Cases of maxillary prognatism (upper jaw being big or too far forward), mandibular prognatism (lower jaw being big or too far forward), asymmetry (jaw off to one side) and anterior open bite (vertical discrepancy, whereby the upper and lower front teeth do not meet during biting) are among the conditions that are suitable to be treated with jaw surgery. This treatment may help in improving the bite, achieving a more balanced facial appearance, and improving function, such as chewing, swallowing and speech. It may also correct birth defects that affect the facial bones. Multidisciplinary team An anterior open bite, where the upper and lower teeth don’t meet vertically when the mouth is closed. In this multidisciplinary treatment, the orthodontic (braces) treatment is supplemented with jaw surgery to move the jaws into a more normal position, and helps to improve the patient’s facial appearance and achieve a better bite. The entire treatment is usually carefully planned at a joint or combined clinic involving an orthodontist (braces specialist) and a maxillofacial surgeon (dental and facial bones surgeon). A clinical psychologist will also perform an assessment as it is important to evaluate and determine the patients’ suitability and preparedness for the surgery. A speech therapist will also be asked to assess certain patients who also have speech problems. Orthognathic surgery can be accomplished in two ways. In the surgery first approach, the surgery is done first prior to the braces treatment, and in the conventional approach, the braces are placed first, prior to the surgery. The approach for each patient is decided according to what best suits the patient. Conventional approach In the conventional approach, the treatment involves putting on braces for almost a year or two prior to the surgery. Adjustment of the braces will be made once every six weeks to get the teeth into the position planned for the surgical movements. Once the alignment and bite are in the position suitable for surgery, detailed surgical planning will first be done on a dental model of the patient (model surgery). This is when the exact surgical movements will be meticulously planned to achieve the best bite possible suitable for the patient’s facial appearance. Just before the surgery, there will be more frequent follow-up appointments to ensure that all the patient’s details are accurate. A baseline health check by the medical team will be arranged to ensure that the patient is fit to undergo surgery. During the surgery, the patient will be under general anaesthesia, meaning that he will be unconscious throughout the surgery. The duration of the surgery depends on the complexity of the jaw cuts and whether it involves single jaw or double jaw surgery. The cuts will be made from inside the mouth, thus avoiding any visible scars on the skin. Metal plates and screws will be used to re-connect the jaws after their movements have been performed. After the surgery, some discomfort, facial swelling and pain are to be expected, and a liquid diet is recommended for the first few days. The patient can expect to stay a few days in hospital to be monitored closely, especially the bite and the surgical sites, and to recover properly. Once discharged from the hospital, appointments will be given at a close interval to further adjust the braces until the ideal bite is achieved. Once an ideal result is achieved, the braces will be removed and the patient will be given a set of retainers to help keep the teeth in their finished positions. Post-surgical healing of the jaw bones can take up to eight weeks. The total treatment duration, on average, can be up to two to three years. Risks and costs Maxillary prognatism or an overbite, where the upper jaw is too big or too far forward. The risks involved are those of wearing braces and having surgery respectively. The risks of wearing braces include pain, discomfort, mouth ulceration, tooth cavities and brown spots (if brushing is not good), root resorption (roots of the teeth becoming shorter), and relapse, where the teeth become crooked again due to insufficient retainer wear. The risks of surgery include bleeding, infection, facial swelling, limited mouth opening, numbness or loss of sensation of the lips, and an improper bite. The relevant specialists would be able to explain the risks in more detail, tailored to the characteristics of each patient, during the consultation. Meanwhile, the cost depends very much on the procedures involved and varies between cases. In essence, it can be divided into the costs for the braces and the costs for the surgery. The costs can be estimated once a proper examination and plan is done. Assistant Professor Dr Noraini Abu Bakar is the head of the orthognathic team at the International Islamic University Malaysia’s Kuantan campus. Those seeking orthognathic treatment can ask for a referral from the university’s Faculty of Dentistry outpatient clinic by calling the Dental Assistant in charge Nor Azma Che Deraman at 09-570 5537. For more information, email starhealth@thestar.com.my. The information provided is for ed [...]
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Medical News Today: Who is most likely to experience 'hangxiety?'
New research finds that 'hangxiety,' the experience of anxiety during a hangover, is higher among shy, introverted people than it is in extroverted people. [...]
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