Health Archives - New Malaysia News

Buy Indian Ayurvedic Herbs Products Online
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Medical News Today: Sore throat and rash: Strep infection and other causes
Strep throat is a common bacterial infection that typically leads to a sore, scratchy throat. Sometimes, it can also cause a rash. Several other conditions that can also cause both a sore throat and a rash. Learn more about those conditions here. [...]
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Kaiser Permanente’s New Medical School Will Be Free for Its First 5 Graduating Classes
Kaiser Permanente’s new medical school will be free to attend for its first five graduating classes, the school announced Tuesday. The newly formed Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine will begin accepting applications from prospective students in June 2019, following the receipt of primary accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, Kaiser announced in a release. The school, which will be located in Pasadena, Calif., will welcome its first class of students in the summer of 2020. Those students, as well as the four following classes, will attend the school for free for all four years of their medical education. “The school will help shape the future of medical education and train physicians for medical excellence and the total health of their patients,” said Kaiser Permanente Chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson in a statement. “The Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine will also reflect our long-standing commitment to diversity and inclusion by training diverse physicians to serve the needs of society.” The school will take advantage of Kaiser’s network of hospitals and clinics to teach students in a hands-on environment, focusing on three pillars of medical education: foundational science, clinical science and health systems science, according to the announcement. Population health, health equity, health care quality and diversity will be emphasized in students’ learning, the medical school says. “Our students will learn to critically examine factors that influence their patients’ health in their homes, workplaces, schools, and communities — and become effective health advocates for their patients,” said founding Dean Dr. Mark Schuster in the statement. Kaiser’s medical school follows in the footsteps of New York University’s School of Medicine, which in 2018 began waiving tuition fees for all students in an effort to ease both student debt and the ongoing physician shortage. Separately, NYU also announced Tuesday that it will open a three-year medical school on Long Island. NYU Long Island School of Medicine will focus on training primary care physicians — who according to a new study are becoming less common on a per-capita basis in the U.S. — and will also be tuition-free. As of 2017, 76% of medical students graduated with education debt, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Total costs for a student residing at a private U.S. medical school averaged nearly $60,000 in 2018-2019, according to the AAMC. [...]
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Why Do I Regain Weight?
Here’s a weight loss treatment that works It’s a great feeling when we reach our desired weight loss goal. There are various methods of weight loss out there. From the latest and trendiest diets to fitness centers that promise success or even invasive surgery like bariatric surgery. Weight loss success can be attainable using these [...] The post Why Do I Regain Weight? appeared first on Women's Health and Fitness. [...]
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Married millennials still need some sex tips
Sex sells … in advertising. In reality, however, many, especially married millennials, lack knowledge in this area and need guidance. They don’t know how to “satisfy” their spouse. Humans, similar to numerous other terrestrial life forms, are subject to instinctive sexual desires, triggered by certain criteria. Although the need for sex is mostly physical, the desire for sex typically begins in the mind and travels to the body. When the mind is stimulated by the object of its desire, it arouses the body. Sex is a basic element of a happy marriage, but it is more than just a pleasurable calorie-burning activity. “When it comes to sexuality, it involves five dimensions: physical or biological, cognitive or intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual. “However, in our society, people tend to talk only about the physical dimension – the climax, G-spot, masturbation, etc,” said Dr Harlina Halizah Siraj, professor of obstetrics and gynaecology, and medical education (clinical teaching), at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia’s Faculty of Medicine. Sexuality is a lifelong learning process and there is no standard formula that can be applied. “When we talk about the cognitive dimension, we refer to the brain as the most important sexual organ. “It makes the decision and the sexual organs (genitalia) will just follow. The sexual organs won’t do anything without the brain commanding them.­ “Next, sexuality is intensely connected to emotions – that is why if you want to have a sexual relationship with someone, that person must be consenting, must have the same benefits of satisfaction, respect and love. “If you force yourself on another person, it will give rise to disrespect, humiliation, hurt feelings, etc. “In the social dimension – we don’t have to talk about sexuality if you want to live like a hermit in the middle of an island or deep forest without interacting with other human beings. “Because humans are social animals, we have to interact with people, but those who feel they are ‘good’ and ‘morally correct’ shy away from the subject. “Lastly, some people interpret sex as spiritual, but actually, it is your significance of existing in this world – how do you define yourself, do you have people who love and respect you? “In a marital institution, these are all things that give you identity. We can only promote sexual and reproductive health when we give positive input to all these dimensions,” explained Dr Harlina. Communication is key Good sex is due to a combination of factors. Dr Harlina offered, “It is not just one person feeling good; sex must end up with good outcomes. “For example, if there is going to be pregnancy, it must be planned, intended and wanted. “If there is a commitment, there should be trust and respect. “If the woman is menstruating, the man must give her space. If not, it is not good sex. “In the beginning, the physical component is important in a marriage and you tend to enjoy the act. “With time, the physical pleasure goes up and down. Towards the end of your marriage, you won’t have sex as frequently as compared to the first few months. “But you realise that you can connect with that person in other ways.” Due to the stressors of a high-pressured life these days, many young couples return home late and fatigued. There are traffic jams to battle, household chores to complete, children to attend to, meals to prepare, etc. They fail to communicate effectively or have no time for intimacy. Good sex must end up with good outcomes for both parties, said Dr Harlina. — NUR ATHIRAH FARHANA/The Star However, Dr Harlina reckoned the mood can be “set up” during the day. “Nowadays, foreplay can happen during the day via Whatsapp!” she pointed out. “Sending your husband a message to say ‘Hey, I’m thinking of you’ is good enough. Then he remembers you. “You don’t have to ‘talk dirty’. Imagine how exciting it would be to finally see each other after work. “And once everyone is settled in the house, you can have the whole night for yourselves. “That to me is the manifestation of how good the quality of communication has been throughout the day. “This can only happen when you can be totally frank with each other. If one person is not feeling up to it that night, then the other party may feel frustrated. “Remember that the ‘me’ becomes ‘we’ when you get married, so there are a lot of adjustments to make. Sharing is about giving and taking,” she counselled. It is definitely no fun when one person is giving or taking all the time. Finding that equilibrium is tough. We all have to live with each other’s idiosyncrasies and imperfections, so every couple has to find their own secret recipe. Prioritise your sex life, and have it at least once a week. Some couples don’t enjoy sex because one partner has expectations, a sort of blueprint. When that blueprint is not followed, one party feels let down. This is where frankness comes in. “Women are always at the receiving end; men will have successful ejaculation if they have an erection, but women don’t need to have an orgasm; we can fake it. “I know of women who fake it all the time because they feel obliged to do so. They think if the husband knew they didn’t have an orgasm, he might be frustrated. “But those are issues we need to be more open about and this can only happen when you are in a stable relationship. “We all have sexual fantasies – there is nothing wrong with talking about them. “Knowledge is important – you must know which part of your body is sensitive to sexual arousal. “Tell your partner where you’d like to be touched – if you can’t even tell that to your sexual partner, then you’re in trouble!” said Dr Harlina. Women, take control! Sending a thoughtful message to your partner during the day can help set the mood for the night. — 123rf.com Women always assume men don’t care a [...]
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Six Great Habits for Starting Your Day
If you find yourself dragging out of bed in the morning and dreading the day ahead, here are simple things you can do that might help to lift your mood. Tags Happiness & Mental Health [...]
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Using Young People’s Blood to Prevent Aging Has No Proven Clinical Benefits, FDA Warns
(Bloomberg) — Taking a young person’s plasma and infusing it into an older person to ward off aging — a therapy that’s fascinated some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley — has no proven clinical benefit, the Food and Drug Administration said. The agency issued a safety alert on Tuesday about the infusion of plasma from young donors for the prevention of conditions such as aging or memory loss, or for the treatment of such conditions as dementia, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease or post‐traumatic stress disorder. “There is no proven clinical benefit of infusion of plasma from young donors to cure, mitigate, treat or prevent these conditions, and there are risks associated with the use of any plasma product,” the FDA said in a statement from Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and Peter Marks, head of the agency’s biologics center. The idea of infusing young blood to fight aging has attracted technology entrepreneurs like billionaire Peter Thiel and was lampooned in a 2017 episode of the HBO show “Silicon Valley.” Thiel’s reported interest was sparked by a company called Ambrosia, which has locations in five states across the U.S. and sells one liter of blood plasma from donors between the ages of 16 and 25 for $8,000, according to its website. Ambrosia’s website was updated Tuesday to say it has “ceased patient treatments” in compliance with the FDA’s advisory. Gottlieb and Marks said none of the plasma treatments has gone through the rigorous testing required by the agency. Ambrosia says “experiments in mice called parabiosis provided the inspiration to deliver treatments with young plasma.” The FDA approval typically requires human trials before companies can make a specific health claim about a product. “The reported uses of these products should not be assumed to be safe or effective,” Gottlieb and Marks said. “We strongly discourage consumers from pursing this therapy outside of clinical trials under appropriate institutional review board and regulatory oversight.” Plasma, the liquid portion of blood, contains proteins to help the blood clot. Plasma infusion is an approved use by the FDA in trauma settings or in patients whose blood doesn’t coagulate. But, the FDA says, there are risks, including allergic reactions, circulatory overload, lung injury and infectious disease transmission. “We’re concerned that some patients are being preyed upon by unscrupulous actors touting treatments of plasma from young donors as cures and remedies,” Gottlieb and Marks said. “Such treatments have no proven clinical benefits for the uses for which these clinics are advertising them, and are potentially harmful.” [...]
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Medical News Today: What gluten-free food can I eat?
Gluten-free foods may help people lose weight and also prevent any symptoms in those who are sensitive to gluten. Examples include vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins. Learn more here. [...]
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The Notorious Herbs for Treating Diabetes of Chinese Medicine
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Medical News Today: Ability to do pushups may predict cardiovascular risk
Recent research has found a strong link between a man's ability to complete numerous pushups and his risk of developing cardiovascular problems. [...]
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Preventing text neck and lower back pain
It’s probably safe to say that not many of us, if any at all, have made a new year resolution to adopt the correct postures while using our smartphones, tablets, laptops or desktops. The use of technological devices has become an inevitable part of the 21st century lifestyle. This growing phenomenon has raised many concerns, one of which is the poor posture we adopt while continuously using these devices, resulting in neck, shoulder and lower back health conditions. Text neck The term “text neck” was coined by American chiropractor DL Fishman, who described the condition as “repeated stress injuries and pain in the neck resulting from excessive watching or texting on handheld devices over a sustained period of time”. A recent study by physiotherapist Lin Jia Huang found that 88.6% of respondents had on-and-off neck and shoulder pains, and continuous neck and shoulder aches from the usage of smartphones. The study also found that there was a positive correlation between the severity of neck and shoulder aches to the level of smartphone addiction. More than half of the participants used smartphones for more than six hours daily, and around 81.6% used smartphones between 21 to 50 times a day. Malaysian Physiotherapy Association president Yew Su Fen says that prolonged wrong posture of the neck while using these devices can lead to very damaging effects to the neck and upper back. “Our mobile usage has transformed our neck posture and upper back drastically. “People tend to crane forward between 45° to 60° more and have their shoulders hunched while using their phones. “When done over a period of time, this posture stresses the cervical spine, leading to early wear and tear, and eventually causing pain,” she explains. However, there are some adjustments we can make in order to counter this condition, says Yew. “The best way to prevent neck aches is to hold our phones 14 to 16 inches (35.6 to 40.6cm) away from our eyes (which is the advisable reading distance). “We should also have our devices at eye level with our head upright, chin tucked in, and our shoulders in a neutral and relaxed position. “Larger fonts are also advisable when using mobile devices.” This is the typical posture when using our smartphone, Which will result in text neck, among other aches and pains, in the long run. — Photos: Inti International University This is the proper posture for looking at our smartphone. Lower back pain Apart from mobile devices, desktops and laptops play a significant role in our daily routine too. Our interactions with these devices can strain the lower back when we are required to sit for long hours in one position. Yew shares that about 70% to 80% of the global population will experience low back pain at some point in their life. She adds that back pain has been ranked highest in terms of disability and sixth in terms of overall health burdens by the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study. Inti International University Programme head for Physiotherapy Thirumalaya Balaraman says that a common reason adults experience lower back pain is because of how we sit in front of our computers. “Many people have an inclination to lean forward to look at their screens when sitting at their desks. “When done over a long period of time, it can impact an individual’s hip and lower back mobility,” he says. To reduce long-term injury, he says: “While sitting, we need to ensure that there is sufficient back support that will enable us to sit upright comfortably and that there is a comfortable viewing distance from our chairs to our screens that will prevent us from leaning forward. “We should also ensure that our feet are rested on an inclined foot rest to prevent excessive stress on our lower backs.” Given that technology is here to stay, applying these minor adjustments to our daily lives could very well keep the doctor (and their bills) away. This is the ideal posture, with the appropriate support, to use our computers daily. This article is courtesy of Inti International University and Colleges. [...]
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Clarity needed for the MySalam and PeKa schemes
Two national health insurance schemes – Skim Perlindungan Nasional B40 (MySalam) and Skim Perlindungan Kesihatan (PeKa) – were launched in January 2019. Their objectives are to provide insurance for the B40 (bottom 40%) household income group in the event they develop 36 critical illnesses in the former, and the screening of a projected 800,000 of B40 Malaysians aged 50 years and above for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the latter. Eligible persons treated at Health Ministry hospitals can make claims from MySalam from Mac 1, 2019. Likewise, the screening for NCDs under PeKa will begin from the same date. What’s included in MySalam? MySalam provides a one-off contribution of RM8,000 directly to those suffering from any of the critical illnesses covered under the scheme, including heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. Those eligible will also get RM50 daily for 14 days should they be admitted to Health Ministry hospitals. This is limited to a maximum of RM700 per year. The MySalam scheme is funded by a RM2bil contribution from insurance company Great Eastern Malaysia, with Great Eastern Takaful being the insurer. This contribution is used to pay the premium for the scheme, which was estimated at RM112 per person annually, for five years. Healthcare professional associations have stated that they were not consulted on MySalam. Some essential aspects of MySalam are unknown. Important issues include the definitions of critical illness and exclusions from the scheme. Are the definitions of critical illness in MySalam the same as that as listed in Great Eastern Malaysia’s website? Are there any exclusions from MySalam, and if so, are they the same as that listed in Great Eastern Malaysia’s website? In the company’s brochure titled Great Early Living Care – Supports you right from the start of a critical illness, the exclusions statement is: “A: No benefit is payable under the following circumstances: • Pre-existing illness. • Death during the first policy year as a result of suicide, while sane or insane. • TPD (total and permanent disability) resulting from self-inflicted injuries, while sane or insane. • Critical illnesses which commence, occur or are diagnosed during the waiting period of 30 days or 60 days (depending on the stage and type of critical illness) from the policy issue/reinstatement date, whichever is later. “In addition, Special Benefit is not payable under the following circumstances: • The Life Assured (the person covered by the insurance policy) did not survive for at least seven days after the diagnosis of an Early Stage Cancer or Early Stage End Stage Liver Failure, as the case may be. • The Life Assured did not survive for at least 14 days after the diagnosis of: – Intermediate Stage Cancer; or – Intermediate Stage End Stage Liver Failure; or – Advanced Stage Cancer; or – Advanced Stage End Stage Liver Failure; or – Diabetic Complications, as the case may be. “Event(s) under the Special Benefit which commence, occur or are diagnosed during the waiting period of 30 days or 60 days (depending on the stage and type of critical illness) from the policy issue/reinstatement date, whichever is later. “The exclusions highlighted here are not exhaustive. Full details are available in the policy document.” In another brochure titled Smart Early Payout CriticalCare, the exclusions statement is: “No benefit is payable under the following circumstances: • Pre-existing Illness. • Any covered critical illnesses which commence, occur or are diagnosed during the waiting period of 30 days or 60 days, depending on the type of critical illness (except for Cancer with Severity 25 and Severity 50 where a 120 days waiting period shall apply), from the Risk Effective Date or from the date of any reinstatement of this rider or the policy, whichever is the latest. “The exclusions highlighted here are not exhaustive. Full details are available in the policy document.” The application forms for MySalam will be online. The application process for those who are not internet-savvy, or who have inadequate or no access to the internet is unknown. Patient confidentiality and consent matters in MySalam are also unknown. Some cancer patients in Health Ministry hospitals have to purchase their own medicines as they are not listed in the Ministry’s Essential Medicines List. The RM8,000 would be insufficient for many of these medicines. What are these patients and their attending doctors to do? What if there is a recurrence of any critical illness, e.g. heart attack, stroke or cancer? What will happen to MySalam after five years? No to PeKa PeKa comprises health screening for those aged 50 years and above in the B40 group (projected as 800,000 people on a first-come-first-served basis), medical devices aid, incentive to complete cancer treatment and transport cost incentive, with an allocated budget of RM100mil. (See PeKa benefits) The programme will be managed by ProtectHealth Corporation Sdn Bhd (PHCorp), a government-linked company (GLC) under the Health Ministry. The Health secretary-general chaired a meeting with medical professional associations on Jan 10, 2019, that discussed the PeKa health screening. The Health Ministry offered RM35 for the initial patient visit and RM30 for follow-up visit if the results were abnormal. The doctors requested a simplified payment of RM65 for both visits, regardless of whether the blood results were normal or not. The ministry countered with RM40 for the first visit and RM20 for the follow-up visit. According to the medical associations, the response to their request for more details and discussion was “take it or leave it”. The medical associations then announced their non-participation in PeKa. According to the Private Healthcare Facilities and Services (Private Medical or Private Dental Clinics) Regulations 2006, general practitioners (GPs) are allowed to charge RM10 to RM35 for the [...]
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Why become vegan or adopt a plant-based diet?
Following the recent addition of the plant-based nutrition course available at SNHS we thought it was a perfect time to outline the ins and outs of veganism and plant-based diets. The dawn of the vegan is upon us as more and more people convert or head towards a more plant-based diet. Whether for ethical, environmental or health purposes, the vegan movement is taking a firm place in society in becoming a mainstream way of life.  For health A well thought out vegan or plant-based diet provides us with all the necessary nutrients a body needs to fulfil a healthy life. Veganism and plant-based diets are often contested as a well-rounded diet with claims that they lack certain minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients. These claims are unfounded however, as with any diet one must balance out what is on the daily menu in order to ensure the body is receiving everything it needs; everything necessary is available, it just needs to be incorporated. Western diets are often far more unbalanced than a well-planned vegan or plant-based diet – processed foods, drinks, red meat, high salt content, high sugar content, preservatives, low nutrient content – all of which, when eaten on a regular basis, is terribly unhealthy. Contrary to popular (uneducated) belief, a good vegan or plant-based diet is suitable for any person at any stage of life. Research has linked vegan and plant-based diets with assisting in lowering blood pressure, cholesterol, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer. It also boosts energy levels and reduces inflammation as well as the risk of chronic diseases, plus vastly improves gut health. Going vegan/plant-based is a great opportunity to learn more about nutrition and cooking, and improve your diet. Getting your nutrients from plant foods allows more room in your diet for health-promoting options like whole grains, fruit, nuts, seeds and vegetables, which are packed full of beneficial fibre, vitamins and minerals. The most difficulty people have about making the switch is that they are unwittingly addicted to the salts and sugars present in most non-plant-based foodstuffs. Processed food tastes so good because of the unnatural additives that people consider it an impossibility to remove from their lives. And meat? Meat is not particularly healthy for us unless it is of the highest, purest, freshest grade – straight out of an untouched by human hands or chemicals, piece of land abundant in high-nutrient lushness, straight to your plate. And how often does that happen? Er, never. The meat we buy in supermarkets has been fed hormones, chemicals, foods which animals were never meant to eat, locked in small spaces with little to no sunlight where they cannot effectively develop muscle, etc, etc. The animals themselves are utterly unhealthy when slaughtered. They are then often processed, they may have colouring added to them to make them look the colour we are led to believe they ought to be, they have preservatives added to make them last longer on the shelves, they have other things added to bulk them up in order to use as little meat product as legally possible but still call it meat, and so on and so on. If all of the things which pass through or are added to an animal before you receive it were put on a plate and handed to you, you would not willingly ingest any of it. Yet we are more than happy to ingest the host disguised as acceptable food! Unfortunately for us the food industry is big business and our health is often prioritised as second to the importance of the revenue generated by mass produced foods. We have to recognise this for ourselves and come up with a new plan to defy this ugly and inhumane system; how about veganism, or a more plant-based diet? For the planet Avoiding animal products is caring for our planet. If everyone stopped eating meat and purchasing anything derived from animals it would make a huge positive impact on the environment. The reduction of your carbon footprint made by cutting out animal products would be significant; the crops needed to feed the animals, the transportation involved, the factories producing the products, the water required for the livestock, the space required for the livestock, cash crops, and any other processes involved would all be greatly reduced and so therefore would deforestation, habitat loss, species extinction. Malnutrition in poor countries would also be affected positively as they would not have to continue utilising the space in their countries for cash crops but could grow food for themselves. Considerably lower quantities of crops and water are required to sustain a vegan diet, making the switch to veganism or a plant-based diet is one of the easiest, most enjoyable and most effective ways to reduce our impact on the environment. For the animals If preventing the exploitation of animals is something that you aspire to be a part of this is an excellent reason to become vegan or move towards a plant-based diet. I have outlined a few of the reasons to avoid meat in the wellbeing section above but the suffering caused by the dairy and egg industry is possibly less well publicised than the plight of factory farmed animals. The production of dairy products necessitates the death of countless male calves that are of no use to the dairy farmer, as well as the premature death of cows slaughtered when their milk production decreases. Similarly, in the egg industry, even ‘ethical’ or ‘free range’ eggs involve the killing of the ‘unnecessary’ male chicks when just a day old. For humanity A plant-based diet requires only one third of the land needed to support a meat and dairy diet. With rising global food and water insecurity due to a myriad of environmental and socio-economic problems, there’s never been a better time to adopt a more sustainable way of living. Avoiding animal products is not just one of the simplest ways an individual can reduce the str [...]
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Medical News Today: Home remedies for menstrual cramp relief
Menstrual cramps are a common symptom of periods. They may cause mild discomfort in some people but severe pain in others. Learn about a variety of home remedies, such as heating pads and massage, here. [...]
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Medical News Today: Parkinson's: How stem cells can help repair the brain
A new review examines the past, present, and future of stem cell therapy for replacing damaged brain cells in Parkinson's disease. [...]
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Medical News Today: Night owls may experience 'jet lag' on a daily basis
New research shows how brain activity in 'night owls' is different from that of 'morning larks,' and how this can affect their productivity and well-being. [...]
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