Foods Archives - New Malaysia News

10 Easy Snacks To Make For Your Netflix & Chill Session
I am a couch potato. It’s a fact that I realised for many, many years back when I decided to stay at home and binge-watch movies after movies, series after series instead of going out and live life. I am pretty sure that I am not the only one who prefers to stay in rather than going out. And I am doubly sure that if you are anything like me, once you sit down on your couch, shows all in sequence, you are not going to get up until you have completed what you planned to do. Therefore, it is crucial, CRUCIAL, to make sure you have all the things you need be within reach from your comfortable and this includes food.   Quick, Easy, Delicious Ah. food. A couch potato’s best friend. Your whole binge-watching experience will never be complete without a whole array of snacks to keep your excitement, suspense or even anxiety at bay. I know this statement is true because I am talking based on experience. How many times you almost die (okay, I am just exaggerating) of thirst or cannot concentrate on the tense scene because of the rumblings of your stomach? If you have something to munch on or drink, you’d save those valuable minutes of pausing or rewinding to watch the same scene. Imagine a world where binge-watching your favourite series or movies without the customary sounds of the occasional crunch; slurp and burp. It’ll be a boring place to live in. So, now we have established the importance of snacking, what are the important criteria to look out for? We want quick, easy and of course, delicious snacks to accompany our viewing session. You understand the delicious part, but ‘quick’ and ‘easy’? Well, allow me to explain. ‘Quick’ here refers to food that can be whipped up in a blink of an eye. Besides, we want our preparation to be simple and less messy. So, the fewer the ingredients, the better!   Winter is Here April is a very special month for many couch potatoes out there, including me. It is the month the final instalment of the Avengers saga is coming out and the long-awaited season 8 of Game of Thrones. Yes, yes, April is a very exciting month. Although the first episode has came out last Monday, if you are like me, you would like to take the time to ensure that all of the episodes are made available online before spending the whole weekend watching rather than waiting in suspense every week. So, why not, take this opportunity to join me in my Game of Thrones refresher marathon this weekend while enjoying these 10 delicious snacks. Let’s check out which foods made it to the list.   1. Pisang Goreng Pisang goreng or banana fritters must be listed in an article about snacks that I am writing. One of the easiest and quickest snacks to prepare, in my opinion, is pisang goreng. Decadently sweet, fluffy on the inside and crispy on the outside, you can definitely finish a plate of pisang goreng on your own. The best thing about it? You are not going to get bored just eating this, especially if you try Butterkicap’s 5-minute Pisang Goreng recipe! 2. Cekodok As a Malaysian, I will definitely say that the best kind of food to snack while watching my favourite show is definitely hands down, Malaysian sweetmeats or kueh. Of course, the easiest option to obtain these kueh for you to munch on is by purchasing them from the nearest makcik but there are a few easy recipes you can try at home. Butterkicap’s cekodok recipe or fried banana balls is unbelievably quick to make that you will be on the couch within the next 15 minutes. Trust me, I have done it before. 3. Mug Cake Whipping out quick desserts is sometimes not ideal when you are already preoccupied with a 4-hour long Netflix and chill session. Therefore, an easy and simple dessert recipe is always welcomed to be shared and tried. Like this mug cake recipe, for example. I am hundred percent sure once you tried it, you’ll be repeating it everytime you’re planning of making a sweet snack while binge-watching your favourite show.   4. Homemade Salted Chips Credit: joyofkosher.com   Ingredients 3 medium potatoes, peeled 1/2 tablespoon of salt 1 teaspoon of ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon of oregano 1/2 teaspoon of basil powder 1/2 tablespoon of vegetable oil   Method Preheat oven to 230 C. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Cut the potatoes in 1/8-inch thick round slices. In a pot of boiling water cook the potato slices for 3-5 minutes. Drain well and combine with oil, salt, pepper and spices in a large bowl. Place potato slices on prepared baking sheet in one layer. Bake for about 15 minutes until crisp and golden brown. Gently remove the chips and place on a cooling rack or parchment paper; let them cool for few minutes and they are ready to serve.   5. Masala Chickpeas Credit: chow.com Ingredients 2 cups of boiled chickpeas 1/2 teaspoon of chilli powder 1 sprig of curry leaves 1 pinch of asafoetida 1 teaspoon of ginger-garlic paste 1 green chilli 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric powder 1/2 teaspoon of mustard seeds 1 teaspoon of garam masala 1/2 teaspoon of cumin   Method Soak the chickpeas overnight for 8 hours. Drain and boil them with 2 cups of water and salt for 10 minutes. Drain the chickpeas and set aside. Heat a pan on medium fire. Add in the mustard seeds, cumin, chilli, curry leaves and asafoetida. Let them splutter for 2-5 minutes. Add in the ginger-garlic paste and saute quickly to remove the raw smell. Add in the cooked chickpeas. Add in the garam masala, salt, turmeric and red chilli powder. Mix well and saute for a minute.   6. Bread Pakora Credit: Youtube Ingredients 4 slices of white bread 4 teaspoons of green chutney a) Stuffing 2 potatoes, boiled & mashed 1 green chilli, finely chopped 1 inch ginger, finely chopped ¼ teaspoon of chilli powder 2 tablespoons of coriander, finely chopped ½ teaspoon of chaat masala ¼ tsp salt   b) Batter 1 cup of gram flour 2 tablespoons of rice flo [...]
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Drink local, think global: Sustainable bartending is not just about straws
What exactly is sustainable bartending? Is it just about doing away with the straw at your bar or recycling your waste? Not even someone like Tom Egerton, who has been championing the concept of sustainable bartending for years, can tell you the exact meaning of the phrase. “It’s something that is quite difficult to work out. It’s a catch-all phrase for a lot of different things. It comes down to ethically sourced ingredients, being mindful of your effect on the environment,” he says. “It’s about understanding where your ingredients come from, whether it’s the produce or spirits, aligning yourself with companies that do good, advocating for responsible and ethical practises.” Hmm … that seems like a lot to think about if one were to try and practise sustainable bartending at their bars. “Well, sustainability isn’t just ONE problem – it’s tens of thousands of little problems that need thousands of little solutions. So it’s a matter of breaking down and working out what it actually looks like and addressing the individual problems,” he says. Egerton is a passionate and well-known advocate for sustainable practises in the world of hospitality, and has even given a TED Talk on the subject before. It is an issue he started getting into during a stint at the Potato Head bar in Hong Kong in 2017. “Before I moved to Hong Kong, I joined a cocktail competition based around the idea of more green operations (the 42Below Cocktail Earth Cup in New Zealand) and that sort of challenged bartenders to create a cocktail that was more ethically minded,” he recalls. “Then when I joined Potato Head, it was a big part of the company’s ethos to be more green and reduce carbon footprint.” He is currently attached to bar consultants and spirits distributors Proof & Co, and he was in town recently to conduct a guest shift at Bar Trigona, Four Seasons Hotel Kuala Lumpur, as well as a masterclass on sustainable bartending and a media tasting of vermouths by Mancino Vermouth. Egerton was at Bar Trigona Four SEasons Hotel for a masterclass on sustainable bartending and to conduct a tasting of Mancino Vermouth with the media. Photo: Wholly Spirits So, if you’re a bar owner or bartender, what should you be looking to change in order to be more sustainable? “It’s very different from place to place. The reality is, what you can do and what works changes from city to city, country to country,” he says. However, the objective of it is the same – to minimise the carbon footprint of your venue. “Whether it’s sourcing for local ingredients, recognising what waste you’re generating and how much, the first step is to understand where you are in that cycle yourself,” Egerton says. That first step is usually the hardest, according to him, as the issues can start piling up and look overwhelming once you start taking a closer look at them. “When you start, you might get a sense of this impossible, huge monster of a journey that can’t possibly be tackled. But what you need to do is break it down to individual components and address them one by one,” he explains. Tom Egerton’s Coffee Cacao was made with raw cacao sourced from a farm in Pahang, as well as cold brew coffee kombucha, Mancino Rosso Vermouth and tonic water. Photo: Wholly Spirits Egerton says one of the best places to start is by taking a look at where you get your produce and ingredients from. “One of the biggest sustainability issues bars have is with citrus and fresh produce. The carbon footprint for making sure we have citrus all year round is huge. It’s less so in the tropics, but can you imagine needing limes in December in Sweden?” he explained. “But that’s just the popularity of certain styles of drinks. While consumers enjoy those drinks, it’s also part of our responsibility as bartenders to maybe find better solutions.” During his visit to Malaysia, Egerton joined the team from Bar Trigona and craft spirits importers Wholly Spirits for a visit to a farm in Raub, Pahang, owned by local artisanal chocolatiers Chocolate Concierge, where he foraged and sourced for local Malaysian ingredients to use in his drinks at the guest shift. The result was a menu of vermouth-based drinks that used locally-sourced cacao, and local fruits like rambutan, pandan, duku langsat and passion fruit, among other ingredients. According to him, bartenders should get into the idea of “drink local, think global”, and try to find ingredients that are produced locally, and not on the other side of the world. “Think about it – do you really need raspberry shipped from Amsterdam, or is there something you can work with locally that can replace it? Can you get something that is made here rather than shipped from the other side of the world? Or do you even need to make that raspberry cocktail in the first place?” he says. Egerton also recommends looking at how the produce is being delivered to your bar. For instance, does it come in plastic bags that are then thrown out every day? How about getting plastic boxes with the bar’s name on them so suppliers can use those to deliver the produce instead of using single-use packaging? “If a producer says they don’t want to do that, you can just say you’ll take your business elsewhere. You’ll be surprised how quickly people change their minds when you tell them that!” he says with a laugh. And finally, the million-dollar question: does doing away with straws actually help? Well, yes, he says, but adds that the no-straw movement has become such a huge sticking point for so many people that it’s become the only thing people tend to focus on. According to Egerton, the use of straws is just one thing in the larger scale of things. “It’s a great starting point, because bartenders use so much of them. If you make five gin and tonics, that’s five straws! The straw has become a symbol (for sustainable bartending), and it’s also easy for pe [...]
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Le Fouquet’s opens up in Switzerland
Le Fouquet's now has branches in three countries. — ©Vivian Song BERNE, April 21 — For the first time, the famous studded red leather chairs that embody the Fouquet’s spirit are taking up residence at the Casino Barrière Montreux, right on the shores of Lake Geneva.On April 26, Paris’s famed Champs Élysées brasserie Le Fouquet’s is set to open its very first Swiss location, replacing the Casino Barrière Montreux’s former restaurant. According to the licensing agreement, the Swiss outpost’s menu will take its cues from the original location’s chef, Pierre Gagnaire, while adapting to the Swiss terroir and its cuisine. The restaurant’s signature dishes, such as its tartare, braised veal loin with carrots, golden-raisin polenta, green peppercorn jus, milk-poached turbot, will round out the offerings.Switzerland is the third country to host a branch of Le Fouquet’s, with the oh-so-chic brasserie already present in Marrakech. In its homeland, it has been duplicated in Cannes, Toulouse, La Baule, Courchevel and Enghien-les-Bains. — AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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At Sunbather Coffee in KL, there is a touch of Japan in everything they do
Visit Sunbather Coffee for a modernised version of Yoshoku (Western-influenced Japanese cooking), drinks and desserts. – Pictures by Choo Choy May KUALA LUMPUR, April 21 – Venture out of your comfort zone. You never know what you'll get. Case in point: Sunbather Coffee (Sunbather).Opened by the Beh siblings – Kok Boon, Chewyeng and Kok Aun – the cafe at The Sphere serves up Yoshoku (Western-influenced Japanese food), specialty drinks and desserts. The team behind Sunbather Coffee (first row, left to right): Daniel Yee Min Earn, Beh Kok Aun, Beh Chewyeng, Heng Xin Min, Gan Shun Kiat, (second row, left to right) Lau Shu Ting, Sakurako Ng Mei Yin, Martin Lai Chen Han, Kan Ka Yan, Beh Kok Boon Hailing from Pangkor island, the trio's first foray into F&B was Thirdwave. Started in 2014, the cafe was born out of the siblings' love for coffee.Most importantly, it was also a learning ground for the novices. "We were very young so we didn't know much about branding and business concepts," explained Chewyeng.Throughout the years, the cafe held its own with a loyal customer base. Devout third wave coffee worshippers kept returning.Gourmands appreciated dishes that reflected immense thoughtfulness. Think Danish smørrebrød rubbing shoulders with matcha hotcakes and Scotch egg.Then, they hit a brick wall. "You don't really know how to expand and you can't see the potential any more," said Chewyeng.With an over-crowded cafe scene and no clear concept, it was hard to push the Thirdwave brand forward. All they could do, Chewyeng explained, was to revamp the menu. Chill out at Sunbather on weekends for small plates, desserts and breakfast In 2016, they launched Kakigōri that serves Japanese shaved ice desserts. Fast forward to 2019 and they now have four outlets in the Klang Valley.It was also a steep learning curve as they dove into the competitive dessert scene. A big part of the Kakigōri brand is their mascot, Yuki. She is envisioned as a snow girl from Japan who must constantly eat kakigōri to keep cool in our tropical weather.Last year, when UOA offered Thirdwave a space at the newly revamped The Sphere, it signalled winds of change.Going back to the drawing board, they pulled out the Sunbather concept. Earlier, they had worked on the concept for another venue but that did not materialise.Once the trio decided to close Thirdwave, they went full steam ahead with developing a menu, especially after Chewyeng returned from London after completing her Bar examinations.With Sunbather, they decided to go for a Japanese slant. "We wanted to find something of a niche in Kuala Lumpur," explained Chewyeng who pursued the same idea when they opened Kakigōri.What she noticed in Japan was Yoshoku was more traditional so they decided to bring a modernised version here.In terms of branding, they introduced another fictitious character known as Mr O who loves to relax, sunbathe and cook Yoshoku. As a tribute to their island origins, both Kakigōri and Sunbather also have water elements embedded into their brand philosophy. Good-for-you oats porridge gets a Japanese makeover with bonito flakes, 'wakame', 'furikake' and ramen eggs Discover dishes like a good-for-you oat porridge which gets an explosion of umami, in the form of wakame, furikake, bonito flakes, shiitake mushrooms and shoyu. For a light lunch, opt for the 'ajitsuke tamago' sandwich made with dark rye bread The sandwich (sando in Japanese) gets a new twist here, as they use dark rye bread. Choose from a comforting ajitsuke tamago version with soft centred ramen eggs, or a maple peanut chicken version built with sous vide chicken breast, apples and maple peanut sauce. Sunbather serves a chicken 'hambāgu' to cater to those who don't like the original beef version. Top your juicy patty with fluffy scrambled egg and cheese for a delicious lunch A classic Yoshoku item, the hambāgu is also served here with demi glace or Japanese curry. Usually available in a beef form, Sunbather ups the game by also offering a chicken version.Coffee was the heart of Thirdwave. Alas, the trio realised from their observations that third wave coffee only attracted a small, exclusive crowd. The concept behind their drinks menu is to have fun and be not too serious... iced matcha latte is paired with hojicha kanten, strawberry milk compote is served with strawberry ice cream and there's the non-caffeine kuromitsu kinako latte Mindful of this, they came up with a more playful range of drinks. "We don't want it to be serious and boring for non-coffee drinkers," said Chewyeng. Hojicha kanten adds a nice dimension to iced latte or matcha latte.Even their apricot ice cream is the perfect partner for an Ethiopian cold brew. Non-caffeine drinkers will be happy with their kuromitsu kinako latte, a comforting black honey and roasted soybean powder hot drink.Refresh yourself with a strawberry milk compote topped with strawberry ice cream, reminiscent of a lighter version of a strawberry milkshake.In devising their menu, the trio had to also consider the location and their customer's needs. Being located in an office area, the weekdays are focused on breakfast and lunch choices.Breakfast starts as early as 8am during weekdays for the office workers. As the day winds down in Bangsar South, their hot kitchen takes a break after 4.30pm.If you feel a little peckish after 3.30pm, there's shokupan Japanese toast. Baked in-house, the milk bread uses the Yudane method to give it a mochimochi effect: firm on the outside but soft and springy inside. A little treat for yourself, coffee jelly paired with a maple and cinnamon waffle crisp and Madagascar vanilla ice cream tinged with blue pea flower This is served with various toppings that range from a simple red bean paste, whipped cream and butter combination to a fruits topped version d [...]
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Cook’s Nook: Ice cold popsicle treats to beat the heat
With temperatures in Malaysia rising to almost unbearable heights of late, how about cooling down with some homemade popsicle treats? Amy Beh’s three recipes highlight different ways to make fruit laden popsicle treats in flavours like mango, blueberry and lychee to beat the heat.   LYCHEE AND PEACH COOLER 150ml canned lychee syrup 80ml canned peach syrup1 tbsp lemon juice 1/4 tsp salt 4 strawberries, diced 1 kiwi fruit, diced 2 pieces canned peach, diced 3 lychees, diced Utensil Ice popsicle moulds Combine lychee syrup, peach syrup, lemon juice and salt in a mixing jug. Stir well to mix thoroughly. Arrange the cut fruits in the popsicle moulds. Pour in the combined syrup mixture until almost full. Freeze the ice popsicle moulds in the freezer for a minimum of 6 hours or until completely set and chilled. YUMMY MANGO POPSICLE 150ml freshly squeezed orange juice 120g ripe mango flesh 60g pineapple 1 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp Greek yoghurt 1 tbsp passionfruit pulp A handful of mango flesh, cut into thin strips Utensil Ice popsicle moulds Combine orange juice, mango flesh, pineapple and lemon juice into a food processor. Blend for for less than a minute. Transfer blended mixture into a jug. Stir in yoghurt and mix evenly. Drop pieces of mango flesh into ice popsicle moulds and pour in the mango mixture gradually to fill up until almost full. Top up with more pieces of mango on the top. Bring the ice pop moulds to the freezer and freeze for a minimum of 6 hours until fully set. BLUEBERRY DELIGHT 300g blueberry yoghurt 1 tbsp icing sugar 3 tbsp plain Greek yoghurt 30g blueberries, diced Utensil Ice popsicle moulds Combine blueberry yoghurt with icing sugar. Add in Greek yoghurt and stir to mix well until creamy. Drop 3/4 of the diced blueberries into the popsicle mould. Spoon in yoghurt mixture until almost full to the brim. Add in additional bits of diced blueberries. Add wooden sticks in the centre of popsicles. Transfer the ice-pop mould to the freezer and freeze for a minimum of 6 hours or until fully set.   [...]
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Tropicana’s popular Ramadan buffet is back
Tropicana Golf & Country Resort is all set to welcome diners for 'buka puasa' throughout the month-long Ramadan. — Picture courtesy of Tropicana Golf & Country Resort PETALING JAYA, April 19 — The practice of gathering with family and friends, strengthening bonds and celebrating togetherness is prevalent during the holy month of Ramadan.If you’re wondering where to go to enjoy a mouthwatering buka puasa feast, Tropicana Golf & Country Resort Berhad (TGCR) is back with its spread of traditional and local delights.Themed “Selera Kampung,” the month-long Ramadan buffet is sure to delight diners.Returning for its 15th instalment, the highly-anticipated annual festive food bazaar is once again all set to welcome over 2,500 diners daily at the resort’s newly-renovated Twenty7 Restaurant and The Palm Coffee House. Themed 'Selera Kampung,' the Ramadan buffet features a variety of local and international specialty dishes. — Picture courtesy of Tropicana Golf & Country Resort With an experienced culinary team at the helm, the resort has carefully prepared over 300 varieties of signature dishes, including Ikan Mayong Asam Rebus Perantaraan Utara and Nasi Briyani Kukus Kabuli Warisan Johor.That’s not all, of course. Be sure not to miss the chefs’ specialty dishes such as Sop Cendawan, Kentang dan Telur and Mee Udang Utara among many more.Returning diners will be happy to know that Gear Box soup — a power-paced broth made from cattle bone infused with various blends of herbs and spices — makes a comeback to the buffet spread.Promising a pleasant “kampung style” experience, diners will be spoilt for choice. Diners will be spoilt for choice as there will be 'live' action food stalls and an amazing buffet spread. — Picture courtesy of Tropicana Golf & Country Resort Diners will also find many new local and international dishes including Tenpayakki, Kebab Daging and Ayam, Thailand Maggi Seda, Korean Cheesy Spicy Fried Chicken, Nasi Lemak Bungkus and Gulai Kawah Ayam Kampung Dara.For those who prefer to break their fast with something sweet and light, there are variety of freshly-cut fruits, dates, colourful kuihs and beverages.Alternatively, those looking for healthier options can head to the Ulam Ulaman counter and make their own salad. The buffet spread features a wide variety of dishes to tantalise all tastebuds. — Picture courtesy of Tropicana Golf & Country Resort This year, guests will be treated to an additional 10 bazaar stalls offering a variety of lifestyle products, decorative items and festive cookies.Available from May 6 to June 4, the “Santapan 29 Malam” buffet starts from RM99 nett (adults) and RM50 nett (children below 12).Early bird vouchers start from RM86 nett (adults) and RM43 nett (children) and are available for purchase until April 25.Diners will receive a complimentary barbeque voucher with every purchase of 10 Ramadan vouchers.For those who wish to host a “Rumah Terbuka” during Hari Raya Aidilfitri, TGCR offers catering services with a total of four menu packages starting from RM48 nett per person.Meat lovers may also add a whole lamb to their menu for RM1,250 nett.For an intimate gathering with family and friends, TGCR also provides in-house catering services for RM98 nett and above per person.Call 03-7804 8888 ext 306/325 or 03-78041919 for reservations or inquiries. [...]
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NS Society Monthly: Vegetables and Bloating
NS Society Monthly class is about ways to be more resourceful when grocery shopping, realistic ways to boost the nutrient density of any meal, ways to drink more water every day, and how much to spend on groceries per week. In this NS Society Monthly Class McKel answers… Maria asked: I know I’m supposed to eat vegetables but I’m always so bloated after eating them, what gives? Lisa asked: Sometimes when I get really stressed or anxious, my stomach hurts, I can’t really eat that much food. What should I do? Amanda asked: I’m so bored with smoothies, but I love how convenient they are for a breakfast on the go – do you have any other tips or tricks to keep smoothies interesting or other foods that are super quick like that, thanks! Courtney asked: What are your thoughts on all of the emerging companies that promote shakes as meals? I feel like the shakes aren’t real/Whole Foods and the fat burners are a bunch of jargon. Just curious on your opinion! Remember, as a member of the NS Society, you can submit your questions, topics, and coaching questions in your new member portal. Also, be sure to check your inbox with news on new features! To get access to your NS Society Member Portal, click here. Need support getting into your account, email us at hello@nutritionstripped.com and we’ll get you hooked up. New Features: NS Society Account Info — To access your member account type, sign into your account here. This is where you will go if you need to update logistics (i.e. your payment method, cancellations, address updates, etc.). Member Portal — NEW! If you’d like to view all your NS Society member content in one easy to access place, go there now! Ask — NEW! We’re evolving our Q&A’s which have been reflected in articles, to video classes. Be sure to submit your question each month to have it answered in the video. Submit your questions, topics, or thoughts here. Join us — NEW! Join McKel and the rest of the members of the NS Society group to chat daily. Click here to request access — it’s a private group to members-only so allow 24 hours for our team to grant your access. Not all our NS Society members want additional support and accountability, so if it’s not your jam no worries, but we’d love to have you! One of many benefits of joining is we’ll be hosting occasional surprise live chats. But, more importantly, it’s a safe space to share your successes and challenges in making self-care, health, and nutrition a daily practice. The post NS Society Monthly: Vegetables and Bloating appeared first on Nutrition Stripped. [...]
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Jiminy! Edible roasted cricket snacks made by Malaysian company Ento
Somewhere in Ara Damansara, the basement and ground floor of a three-storey shoplot bustles with energy and activity – this is after all the home of 20kg of live crickets. These spindly bugs, found in gardens and fields everywhere – will live for six to eight weeks in the shoplot, before reaching their final destination – the palates of discerning Malaysian consumers eager to embrace a more planet-friendly source of protein. The project is the brainchild of a Malaysian start-up company called Ento, founded by 26-year-old lawyer-turned-entrepreneur Kevin Wu Khai Woon. Although it is still in its infancy, the enterprise is a timely one that is answering the resounding clarion call of sustainable agriculture. Why eat bugs? Entomophagy (the consumption of insects) has been around for centuries. According to the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation in its paper ‘Future prospects for food and food security’, there are at least 1,900 edible insects and approximately two billion people around the world who eat these creepy crawlies as part of their traditional diets. People have been eating insects for centuries now. This is exemplified by people in Thailand who eat deep-fried crispy beetles and locusts as street food and rural denizens in Borneo who munch on grasshoppers, cicadas and termites. But it is only in recent years that insects have been touted as the food of the future, in line with growing concerns about the swelling global population. By 2050, the human population is expected to be nine billion. In order to feed all these hungry mouths, current food production will need to double. Given that overfishing is rampant and 70% of agricultural land is used to breed livestock, a more planet-friendly solution is required, and all the signs are pointing towards insects. Insects reputedly emit fewer greenhouse gases and require half as much food as chicken and pigs as well as significantly less land for rearing. Then there are the health benefits associated with insects – many of which are protein-rich and high in calcium, iron and zinc. Edible insects have also become fashionable – Justin Timberlake served ants coated in black garlic at his 2018 album launch party while Angelina Jolie was seen frying up a meal of scorpions and other bugs in a BBC News video. Crickets galore For all these reasons and so many more, Wu was propelled to start Ento. “I came across an article about edible insects and was really fascinated by the idea of crickets for human consumption. As I did more research, I found out that crickets and other insects have a very good value proposition for the future,” he explains. So with some money from his family, Wu rented a shoplot (he went to 20 different places before finding the right one), bought some crickets from a supplier who typically supplies to pet shops and with help from an experienced farm manager, started breeding the insects with the idea of turning them into snacks. Ento crickets are kept in sanitised pens before being frozen and slow-roasted. Photo: Ento Although Wu and his team now have their “recipe” down pat, he says getting the temperature, feed and other elements of cricket-breeding correct initially proved to be quite a challenge. “It’s quite technical, there’s no blueprint on how to farm insects, because right now Malaysia lacks the expertise of having people working this field,” he says. Consequently, it took Wu and his team about six months to perfect the means and methods of processing their crickets. Ento crickets are housed in sanitised pens and fed commercial chicken feed, which is composed of corn, soybean and wheat. Once the crickets mature, their frass (poop) and other impurities are separated, and they are then placed in a deep-freezer for 12 hours, which is the most humane way of killing them. “When we freeze them, they actually go into a really deep sleep, so it’s a bit like when they are in the wild and hibernate. We freeze them for at least 12 hours so they just sleep and don’t wake up again,” says Wu. Wu started Ento because he has a passion for sustainability and believes in the future of insects as food. After this, the crickets are slow-roasted at temperatures ranging between 140ºC to 160ºC for at least three hours until 80% of the moisture evaporates – this also effectively kills bacteria while preserving the insects’ nutritional value. Samples are then sent to a lab for lab testing, before being packed. Wu says farming the crickets has proven very sustainable, as according to their data, crickets require 12 times less feed, 15 times less water and 14 times less land than conventional livestock farming. “I’m very passionate about sustainability. As a millennial, I feel that it’s part of our DNA to want to see change and a better future. So we are trying to get people to think about how they define food and expand their horizons to see food and sustainability as something that is important,” he says. Interestingly, Wu says Malaysia is the ideal breeding ground for crickets, because the insects actually thrive in heat and humidity. “Malaysia has a competitive advantage, because the warm and humid climate is suitable for crickets, whereas our Canadian and American competitors have to pay for high heating costs. But for us, we can farm it locally at a lower cost and use our natural environment to our advantage,” he says. The taste test At the moment, Ento produces both cricket powder (priced at RM29.90 for 100g) as well as a range of whole roasted crickets in flavours like Korean kimchi, salted egg yolk and Texas barbecue, priced at RM19.90 for a 25g pack. Each packet of roasted crickets is rich in protein – up to 60g of protein per 100g, which is much higher than the protein content of lean beef and chicken, which both clock in at under 40g. Data also shows that crickets contain 15% more iron than spinach and far more fibre than oatmeal. “Those are some of the sta [...]
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Massimo Bottura, Gucci to open pop-up restaurant in Singapore
Michelin-starred chef Massimo Bottura will take up residency in Singapore for a month-long pop-up, bringing his chef Karime Lopez with him. ― AFP pic SINGAPORE, April 18 ― Massimo Bottura is bringing a version of his Gucci restaurant to Singapore next month.The Michelin-starred chef will take up residency in Singapore for a month-long pop-up, bringing his chef Karime Lopez with him. Lopez runs the kitchen of Gucci Osteria at Gucci Garden Museum ― a museum, retail and dining space in the historic Palazzo della Mercanzia in Florence, Italy.Bottura is best known for his Modena, Italy restaurant Osteria Francescana, which currently tops the World's 50 Best Restaurants list.At The Arts House, diners will be able to choose between a four or seven-course lunch and a seven-course dinner menu.Judging from the menu, meals will be playful and casual, with names like “Holy Cannoli,” “The  Crunchy Part of the Lasagna” and “Meet the Meat.”The pop-up is the latest project for the busy Italian chef. Between his flagship restaurant in Modena, Bottura opened his first international outpost Torno Subito at the W Dubai  ― The Palm hotel in Dubai earlier this year; collaborated on a single malt whisky with The Dalmore; and is opening a luxury Italian inn later this month.Gucci Osteria runs May 1-26. ― AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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How Much Do Vitamin D Supplements Affect Lifespan?
In 1822, a Polish physician was the first to publish that sunlight could cure the vitamin D deficiency disease rickets. His work was ignored by mainstream medicine for a century, not coming into widespread use until the 20th century, when wire cages were actually affixed to tenement buildings so babies could benefit from the sun. In my video Will You Live Longer If You Take Vitamin D Supplements?, I explore whether we’re in a similar situation now, where the medical profession has just not caught up with the science. Researchers have documented correlations between higher vitamin D levels and all sorts of positive outcomes like decreases in cardiovascular disease, weight gain, infectious diseases, and declining cognitive function, and even tested whether vitamin D supplementation might reduce the adverse effects of earthquakes. It seems to help with everything else, so why not? It’s actually not as silly as it sounds because traumatic events like natural disasters can have a significant psychological impact that might be affected by vitamin D status. But when researchers put supplements to the test, the purported links often didn’t pan out. This lack of effect may exist in part because low vitamin D levels may just be a marker for things like aging, obesity, smoking, and inactivity. Or, maybe low vitamin D didn’t lead to disease, but disease led to low vitamin D, because inflammation can drop D levels within the body. So, just because low D levels and disease seem to be correlated, it doesn’t mean that vitamin D deficiency is the cause. While the majority of observational studies may show a link, where you simply measure vitamin D levels and disease rates, in only a handful of conditions have interventional studies—where you give people D supplements or placebos then see what happens—proven vitamin D to be effective. One of the conditions for which vitamin D supplements appear to genuinely work, however, is helping to prevent premature death. Fifty-six randomized clinical trials involving nearly 100,000 people (mostly women) between the ages of 18 and 107 were randomized to four years of vitamin D supplements or sugar pills. Putting all the studies together showed those given vitamin D supplements lived longer and specifically had a lower risk of dying from cancer. This effect appeared limited to vitamin D3, though, which is the type derived from plants and animals, not vitamin D2, which is the type derived from yeast and mushrooms. How large an effect was it? It would take 150 people taking vitamin D supplements for five years to save one life. If we were talking about a drug, we’d need to weigh that against the cost and side effects of dosing so many people. But when we’re talking about something as safe and cheap as vitamin D supplements, it seems like a bargain to me. A similar analysis pegged the benefit at 11 percent in terms of reduction of total mortality, which is pretty substantial, potentially offering a life extension benefit on par with exercise. Though, no, it does not seem to reduce the adverse impacts of earthquakes. The only concern is that it may give people license to order an extra doughnut or something. We still have to eat healthfully because any longevity benefit from vitamin D would just be a small adjunct to a healthy lifestyle. But, for those of us who want all the help we can get, the question then becomes how much should we take? I address that in my videos How Much Vitamin D Should You Take? and The Optimal Dose of Vitamin D Based on Natural Levels. For an exploration of the purported links between vitamin D and obesity, diabetes, and hypertension, see my video Do Vitamin D Supplements Help with Diabetes, Weight Loss, and Blood Pressure?. The “extra doughnut” effect can explain How Diet Soda Could Make Us Gain Weight. You may also be interested in: The Risks and Benefits of Sensible Sun Exposure The Best Way to Get Vitamin D: Sun, Supplements, or Salons? The Best Supplement for Fibromyalgia Vitamin D for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Vitamin D for Asthma Should Vitamin D Supplements Be Taken to Prevent Falls in the Elderly? In health, Michael Greger, M.D. PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations: 2012: Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death 2013: More Than an Apple a Day 2014: From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food 2015: Food as Medicine: Preventing and Treating the Most Dreaded Diseases with Diet 2016: How Not To Die: The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, and Reversing Our Top 15 Killers [...]
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The Le Petit Chef experience offers live action fun on the plate
In 2015, Belgian artists Filip Sterckx and Antoon Verbeeck began delighting intrepid diners with Le Petit Chef billed as “the world’s smallest chef”. The engaging visual and culinary odyssey sees diners being entertained by a revolutionary 3D show involving a 58mm little chef projected onto guests’ plates in animated format. The little ‘un gets into all sorts of hilarious scrapes in his attempts to make delicious culinary concoctions, and each segment of the animation segues effortlessly into real-life meals presented to diners (cooked by real-life chefs), often bearing startling resemblances to the animations. Since its introduction, Le Petit Chef has been a feature in cities like Toronto, Cologne, Basel, London and Stockholm, among others. Now – for the first time – Malaysian diners will also be able to indulge in this immersive experience, exclusively at Elements KL in the Klang Valley. The eatery will host Le Petit Chef for the next two years; incidentally, Malaysia is the first country in South-East Asia to have Le Petit Chef. The Le Petit experience seats a maximum of 36 people per session and starts at RM299 per person. Each session takes approximately 90 minutes from beginning to end. The gourmet aspect of the experience is taken care of by seasoned chef Jeff Ramsey (who earned a Michelin star working at the Mandarin Oriental Tokyo’s Tapas Molecular Bar). Ramsey admits that translating the videos into actual meals has been a bit of a challenge for him. “It is a pre-determined visual so that’s the challenge, because it doesn’t leave a lot of room for interpretation and there are limitations to what you can do from a chef’s perspective, but I do want to make sure the food without the video can stand alone as a good product, so that’s why we’ve kept the food simple,” says Ramsey. A Le Petit Chef meal begins with waiters adjusting the pure white plates on each table to ensure the projections can be seen clearly. Soon after that, diners get their first glimpse of the little chef, who as it turns out, is a mischievous little thing always up for a lark. The preface to the first course sees the little chef plonked in the middle of the sea. His seaside adventure involves very realistic movements and sounds, including getting onboard a jet-ski and chopping off an octopus’ tentacles. The first course of sea bream, Hokkaido scallop and Venus clam with a crab and prawn bisque is quite sea-tastifying. Before long, the aroma of seafood begins to assail diners’ senses and soon a piping hot meal of sea bream, Hokkaido scallop and Venus clam with a crab and prawn bisque appears as if out of thin air, fluidly replacing the animation with the real deal. In terms of reconstructing the animated meal, the first course does a great job. Taste-wise, it measures up too. The seafood is extremely fresh and has been cooked well, while the chickpeas coating the base of the plate offer a pleasant textural contrast. But it is the bisque that is the star here – you’ll feel the slightly briny essence of the sea in each mouthful. The next animation sees the diminutive chef embark on an underwater escapade. The visual imagery in this particular scene is stunning, almost as though it has been plucked out of The Little Mermaid. Here vivid, aquamarine shades take centre stage, and sea creatures abound. The denouement of the episode is the little chef hauling up a giant lobster onto a plate. The butter roasted jumbo prawn is a far cry from a huge lobster but it is delicious on its own merit. Admittedly, having seen that humongous lobster, the butter- roasted jumbo prawn that follows is a bit of a visual let-down. “Yeah, they put that big lobster on the plate but lobster is very expensive in Malaysia, so we have to balance dreams with reality,” says Ramsey pragmatically. Thankfully, although the portion size doesn’t effortlessly meld from projection to plate, the taste does deliver. The prawn is tenderly yielding and packed with flavour and the polenta cake on the side makes for a competent sidekick. For the main course, the animation and reality deviate slightly, but this ties in with very practical dietary concerns. While the cartoon depiction shows a huge slab of steak, the main course (depending on what you’ve chosen) could very well be roast aged chicken breast with truffle chicken jus, for diners unable to consume beef. The roast aged chicken breast is a little lacklustre but the truffle jus makes up for it. The chicken is tender but a little lacking in flavour, although this is alleviated somewhat by the delightfully opulent, rustic notes of the truffle jus. Surprisingly, the real revelation in this meal is the mashed potatoes, which are sensationally good. The spuds have an almost whipped, cloud-like consistency and are putty-soft with buttery undertones. The precursor to dessert is probably the most engaging animation of the entire experience. Here, the tiny chef has a whole lot of fun in the snow, from riding on a sleigh to using a spoon as a catapult. The dessert is fuss-free but hits all the right notes.  This imagery is quickly replaced with a simple dessert of malted vanilla ice-cream with caramelised milk, aerated Valrhona 70% dark chocolate and strawberry orange blossom sauce. This is an uncomplicated dessert that ticks all the right sweet boxes, although the fresh berries in the mixture are a little sour. Overall, Le Petit Chef offers an interesting interplay of 3D animation and gastronomy, in what proves to be an innovative journey of exploration and discovery. Plus, the little chef is kinda cute too. Le Petit Chef at Elements KL Hive, Unit H-G-11 Trec 438 Jalan Tun Razak, Kuala Lumpur Book online at: www.elements.my Opening hours: Tuesday to Thursday (7pm and 8.30pm seating); Friday (6.30pm, 8pm and 9.30pm); Saturday (5.30pm, 7pm, 8.30pm and 10pm); Sunday (5.30pm, 7pm and 8.30pm) [...]
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Where Vitamin D Supplements Fail
As I discuss in my video Do Vitamin Supplements Help with Diabetes, Weight Loss, and Blood Pressure?, review articles continue to be published touting vitamin D as a veritable cure-all. The vitamin D receptor is found in most tissues in the body, including the brain, and upwards of 2,000 genes may be regulated by vitamin D. Within 24 hours of vitamin D exposure, we can change the expression of hundreds of genes. The term vitamin is a misnomer, though, because vitamins by definition cannot be synthesized within our body, but we can make all the D we need with sufficient sun exposure. So, rather than a vitamin, D is actually a hormone that’s produced by our skin in response to sunlight exposure. D is not just a hormone of calcium regulation and bone health; it’s also a hormone of fertility, immunity, and brain function. But is it a panacea or a false prophet? Remember when vitamin E was the vitamin du jour, touted as a “curative for many clinical disorders”? Supplement sales of vitamin E, the “radical protector,” created a billion-dollar business that capitalized on the public’s fears. After all, those with low levels of vitamin E in their blood had a 50 percent higher cancer risk. Similar attention was directed towards vitamin A or beta-carotene. People who eat lots of greens, sweet potatoes, and other beta-carotene-rich foods have lower risk of cancer, so maybe we should give people beta-carotene pills? When they were put to the test, however, beta-carotene pills actually increased cancer rates. In fact, beta-carotene, vitamin A, and vitamin E supplements all may increase mortality, so when we buy these supplements, we’re potentially paying to shorten our lifespans. As such, I imagine you can understand the skepticism in the medical community regarding claims about vitamin D, which is now enjoying its moment in the sun. Having a half-billion-dollar vitamin D supplement industry doesn’t help matters in terms of getting at the truth. And there’s also a highly lucrative vitamin D testing industry that loves to talk about the studies suggesting that having higher vitamin D levels may reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, and infections. Most of this research, however, stems from observational studies, meaning studies that correlate higher D levels in the blood with lower disease risk, but that doesn’t mean vitamin D is the cause. It’s like the early beta-carotene data: Higher levels in the blood may have just been a marker of healthy eating. Who has high beta-carotene levels? Those who eat lots of greens and sweet potatoes. Similarly, higher levels of vitamin D may just be a marker of healthy behaviors. Who has high vitamin D levels? Those who run around outside, and those who run around outside, run around outside. Indeed, higher vitamin D levels may just be a sign of higher physical activity. So, for instance, when you see studies showing significantly lower diabetes rates among those with higher vitamin D levels, it doesn’t mean giving people vitamin D will necessarily help. You have to put it to the test.  And, when you do, vitamin D supplements fall flat on their face, showing no benefit for preventing or treating type 2 diabetes. So, when supplement companies wave around studies suggesting vitamin D deficiency plays a role in obesity, because most population studies show that obese individuals have lower vitamin D levels in their blood, is that simply because they’re exercising less or because it’s a fat-soluble vitamin so it’s just lodged in all that fat? We might expect obese sunbathers to make more vitamin D, since they have more skin surface area, but the same exposure level for them leads to less than half the D bioavailability, because it gets socked away in the fat. This is why obese people may require a dose of vitamin D that’s two to three times higher than normal weight individuals, although they may get it back if they lose weight and release it back into their circulation. This would explain the population data. Indeed, when you put vitamin D to the test as a treatment for obesity, it doesn’t work at all. It’s a similar story with artery health. Those with low vitamin D levels have worse coronary blood flow, more atherosclerosis, and worse artery function, but if you actually put it to the test in randomized controlled trials, the results are disappointing. Vitamin D is also ineffective in bringing down blood pressures. This all adds to the growing body of science “casting doubt on the ability of vitamin D supplementation to influence health outcomes beyond falls, fractures, and possibly respiratory tract infection and all-cause mortality.” Wait. What? Vitamin D supplements may make you live longer? That’s kind of important, don’t you think? I talk about that in my video Will You Live Longer If You Take Vitamin D Supplements?. Explore the other videos in my series on vitamin D, including: How Much Vitamin D Should You Take? The Optimal Dose of Vitamin D Based on Natural Levels The Best Way to Get Vitamin D: Sun, Supplements, or Salons? The Risks and Benefits of Sensible Sun Exposure And check out these other videos on vitamin D’s potential benefits: The Best Supplement for Fibromyalgia Vitamin D for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Vitamin D for Asthma For additional videos on supplements, see: Dietary Supplement Snake Oil Some Dietary Supplements May Be More Than a Waste of Money Risk Associated with Iron Supplements Treating Asthma with Plants vs. Supplements? Broccoli: Sprouts vs. Supplements Antioxidants and Depression Are Calcium Supplements Safe? Are Calcium Supplements Effective? Industry Response to Plants Not Pills Resveratrol Impairs Exercise Benefits Lycopene Supplements vs. Prostate Cancer Dangers of Dietary Supplement Deregulation Do Vitamin C Supplements Prevent Colds But Cause Kidney Stones? Black Raspberry Supplements Put to the Test In health, Michael Greger, M.D. PS: If yo [...]
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Papa roach: Chinese farmer breeds bugs for the table
Cockroach farmer Li Bingcai eats an exuvial roach at his farm in Yibin, China’s southwestern Sichuan province March 25, 2019. — AFP pic YIBIN, April 16 — As farmer Li Bingcai opened the door to his cockroach farm in south-west China, an insect the size of a dart flew into his face.Picking the critter off his forehead, he tossed it back into the dark room where some 10 million more of its kind scurried around, housed in wooden frames perched on shelves.The six-legged creatures may be a bugbear for most, but Li and other breeders in China are turning them into a niche business.Some sell cockroaches for medicinal purposes, as animal feed or to get rid of food waste.Li breeds them for something else: Food for human consumption.A restaurant down the road from his small facility fries them up in famously spicy Sichuan sauce for the gutsier eaters.“People don’t believe how good it is until they try some,” Li told AFP, putting a live one into his mouth as others crawled all over the place and people visiting.Known colloquially as American cockroaches, the Periplaneta americana is one of the largest species and are consumed for a variety of ailments: Stomach ulcers, respiratory tract problems, and even simply as a tonic.“The greatest effect of cockroaches are that they have great immunity, which is why humans will absorb its benefits after eating them,” Li said, noting that in China cockroaches are dubbed “Little Strong” because they can live for days even after being cut in half.Tucked at the edge of bamboo-covered mountains in Yibin, Li’s facility is a nondescript single-storey former farmhouse surrounded by crop fields and livestock farms.The breeding area is roughly the size of a badminton court, with windows sealed off with netting to prevent any great escapes.Security is paramount: In 2013, some one million cockroaches escaped a farm in eastern Jiangsu province roamed free after their greenhouse was destroyed. Cockroach farmer Li Bingcai tends to his roach farm in Yibin, China’s southwestern Sichuan province March 25, 2019. — AFP pic Health benefits?Li’s cockroaches live between the spaces of square wooden frames that are held together by pipes and stored in racks lining two rooms. The place is kept warm and humid, leaving a smell reminiscent of damp clothes.Feeding time causes a frenzy — as Li heaps a mix of ground corn, fruit and vegetable peelings on small trays, the insects suddenly swarm the platforms, crawling over each other.“We breed them in a hygienic environment. They eat proper food — nothing synthetic,” he said.Every three months, Li harvests the cockroaches to keep the population under control by dropping some into a vat of boiling water before dehydrating the carcasses.Last year, he sold one tonne of dried cockroaches to a pharmaceutical factory for nearly 90,000 yuan (RM55,556).Li ran a mobile phone shop when he went into cockroach farming in 2016 because it was low cost business and the insects are easy to rear. He converted his farmhouse and bought eggs from another breeder.His main source of income is from selling the insects directly to farms or medicine factories, and this is supplemented by an online shop his daughter helped set up. Half-a-kilo of whole dehydrated insects retail for between 100 and 600 yuan.In neighbouring Xichang, the Gooddoctor Pharmaceutical Group runs the world’s largest cockroach farm where a whopping six billion insects held in a facility that employs artificial intelligence in monitoring movement and environmental conditions.Cockroaches were added in the late 16th century to the Compendium of Materia Medica, the most comprehensive medical book ever written about traditional Chinese medicine.The bugs have detoxifying properties and can act as a diuretic, said Liu Daoyuan, chief specialist at the Yinchuan City Yongshou Medical Centre.“It is also effective for relieving sore throat, tonsillitis, (liver) cirrhosis and fluid build-up,” he added. Cockroach farmer Li Bingcai shows dehydrated whole roaches, used as medication, at his farm in Yibin, China’s southwestern Sichuan province March 25, 2019. — AFP pic But other Chinese medicine experts caution that a poorly regulated industry with a low barrier of entry could result in adverse effects.“Anything in excess can be harmful, even ginseng,” warned Goh Chye Tee, director of the Chinese Medicine Clinic at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University.He noted the insect is not named China’s official compendium of drugs covering both Chinese and western medicine.‘They are gold’But Li is more interested in turning roaches into a delicacy and is working with a local restaurant.Customers have been clamouring for a taste after hearing about the dish’s health benefits, said owner Fu Youqiang, who cooks up to 30 orders a month.Diner Luo Gaoyi, who was trying the insect for first time, described it as being “quite tasty, very fragrant, very crispy”.“I think that anything good for health should be eaten, no matter what it is,” he said. “These have high nutritional value and are high in protein.”Li is also working on expanding his line: Cockroach-laced medical cream, cockroach medicated plasters, and insole inserts containing cockroach essence.He said: “There is so much good in this one insect, I want to tell more people about it. A lot of people think it’s a pest but to me, they are gold. They are like my children.” — AFP [...]
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Turmeric Mashed Potatoes
If you’re looking for a delicious twist on classic mashed potatoes, you’ve come to the right place. Potatoes often get a bad rep but hear me out. This is usually because they are sliced and deep fried in vegetable oil or mashed with tons of butter and heavy cream. But what about healthier cooking methods like roasting, boiling, and steaming? Potatoes are a carbohydrate (a starchy vegetable) and as with any other carbohydrate, my recommendation is to make sure you’re enjoying it alongside a high-quality protein source, healthy fat, and of course plenty of fiber. This delicious Turmeric Mashed Potato recipe is simple to make, heats up for great leftovers as a side dish, and has proven to be a crowd pleaser with our friends and family. We’ve chatted about of the nutritional benefits of turmeric before at Nutrition Stripped and how easy it is to incorporate healthy ingredients (like fresh herbs and spices) into dishes that can be reheated throughout the week and still taste delicious. We found that this Turmeric Mashed Potato recipe was a perfect match of using fresh herbs and spices and having fun with leftovers. We can’t take the full credit for this genius recipe. It is traditionally a popular Indian street food, called Pav Bahji, and inspired by chef Priya Krishna. After making this dish three weeks in a row, we quickly realized how versatile it could be on the table. We initially paired the side with our Tofu Tikka Marsala recipe, but soon found out it is great with just about anything you would serve that pairs well with veggies. If you are like us and love potatoes, but you still want a healthier version and are feeling a little adventurous, try this super easy recipe at home. We have a feeling you will love it as much as we do! The post Turmeric Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Nutrition Stripped. [...]
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Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls Ada Untuk Semua
Dalam kalangan anak-anak muda, apakah dua makanan yang paling mereka minati? Macam-macam jawapan pasti bermain dalam fikiran anda tapi, adakah ‘dimsum’ dan ‘boat noodle’ ada dalam senarai anda itu? Jika ya, 100 markah untuk anda! Artikel ini bukanlah untuk membuatkan anda menjawab trivia tentang makanan kegemaran milenial mahupun saya bercadang untuk membuat soal selidik. Apa yang saya nak anda bayangkan sekarang ialah satu tempat yang menjual kedua-dua makanan ini. Adakah anda berasa teruja apabila memikirkannya? Adakah anda mahu mengunjungi restoran yang menawarkan kedua-dua hidangan ini? Jika jawapan anda ya dan ya, berita baik untuk anda! Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls, Subang Parade tempat wajib untuk anda kunjungi.   Tarikan Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls Sejujurnya, apabila melangkah masuk ke dalam restoran tersebut, Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls kelihatan seperti restoran biasa tetapi setelah menyelak menu yang diberi, ternyata restoran ini sedia untuk memenuhi segala kehendak dan keinginan anda. Tiada lagi pertelingkahan dalam memilih sama ada nak makan boat noodle ataupun dimsum selepas ini!   Halal dan Sedap Meskipun ada variasi, dua perkara yang paling penting ialah status halal dan sedap ataupun tidak makanan yang disediakan, betul tak? Di sini, anda tidak perlu khuatir kerana Dodo DIm Sum & Bowls mempunyai sijil halal dan setiap bahan yang disumber datang dari pengeluar yang mempunyai status halal. Bolehlah bawa ibu bapa, saudara mara yang tidak pernah cuba dimsum mahupun boat noodle ke sini. Berkenaan kesedapan makanan yang disediakan. Sejujurnya, ada sajian yang saya tidak berminat untuk makan buat kali kedua. Mungkin tidak kena dengan citarasa saya. Namun begitu, tak perlulah kita fokus pada yang negatif. Di bawah merupakan antara makanan wajib cuba apabila ke sana: 1. Lo Mai Kai Kalau anda makan dimsum, tidak lengkaplah pengalaman dimsum anda tanpa hidangan lo mai kai ini. Sajian Lo Mai Kai ataupun Lo Mai Gai ini merupakan nasi pulut yang dikukus bersama ayam dan cendawan. Di Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls rasa ayam dan cendawan cukup terserlah dalam hidangan pulut ini dan tidak begitu berat sehinggakan membuat anda terasa jelak atau terlalu kenyang.   2. Kaki Ayam Kalau anda tidak pernah cuba kaki ayam sebelum ini, saya pasti hidangan kaki ayam mampu mengubah pandangan anda selepas ini. Disalut dengan sos lekit masam manis, hidangan kaki ayam ini memang cukup menyelerakan apabila dimakan panas-panas. Jadi, jangan tunggu terlalu lama, ambil gambar dan sebagainya. Nanti tak sedap.   3. Kek Lobak Putih Goreng Dalam banyak-banyak hidangan yang saya cuba di Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls, hidangan kek lobak putih goreng ini ialah hidangan kegemaran saya. Menggunakan stail berbeza daripada kelazimannya, hidangan ini disediakan ala char kuey teow dan ternyata, membawa kelainan yang cukup dialu-alukan. Memang tak berhenti menyuap saya!   4. Nam Tok & Khao Soi Bagi kategori boat noodle pula, hanya dua perisa sup yang berjaya menarik minat saya untuk makan iaitu Nam Tok (sup lembu) dan Khao Soi (Sup Bersantan). Sejujurnya, saya bukanlah peminat boat noodle tetapi kedua-dua perisa sup tersebut mempunyai rasa yang ringan dan halus; sesuatu yang kontra dengan perisa dimsum dan hidangan lain yang bergoreng. Khao Soi – Patut dicuba!   Berbuka Bersama Dodo Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls sesuai untuk dikunjungi pada bila-bila masa tetapi saya syorkan untuk anda mempertimbangkan restoran ini sebagai lokasi berbuka anda dek kerana pilihan makanan pelbagai yang ditawarkan. Tidak perlu bergaduh, tidak perlu memilih kerana Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls ada untuk semua! Buat tempahan sekarang:- A: LG10 G2, Jalan Kemajuan Subang, Ss16, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor M: +603-5631 1171 W:http://dodo.my/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/dododimsumbowls IG: dododimsumbowls The post Dodo Dim Sum & Bowls Ada Untuk Semua appeared first on Butterkicap. [...]
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The art of pairing sake with Japanese food
Sake is almost unrivalled when it comes to Japanese food-and-drink pairings. Many of the sake brewers I have met have told me that their sake is meant to go with food, as the traditional Japanese rice wine has qualities that can help enhance the flavours in the food. Some have even suggested their sake tastes even better when paired with a certain sort of meal. So, when Japanese restaurant franchise Kampachi invited me for an omakase food and sake pairing at its Pavilion Kuala Lumpur branch, I simply could not resist. Omakase means “I leave it to you” in Japanese, and refers to the Japanese tradition of leaving it up to the chef to decide what you eat. Kampachi has invited Chef Yamazumi Keisuke, a well-known Japanese chef known for his omakase menus and sake pairings, to feature his unique creations throughout the month of April. Born and raised in Kagoshima Prefecture, Yamazumi started his culinary journey as an apprentice with famous Tokyo sushi bar Asahizushi Shonten at the young age of 19, and has since mastered a broad range of Japanese culinary skills over the decade. Appointed as the head chef of Asahizushi in 2015, he also directs the corporate catering team with his imaginative creations and exuberant flair. With his discerning tastes in Japanese sake, his omakase focuses on the ebb and flow of flavours that ensure diners experience a unique combination in each Omakase course. Yamazumi usually handles sake pairings in two ways – the first is by complementing the flavours of the food and the sake, for example, strong flavours with strong flavours, light and light. “The other way is more experimental, where I purposely choose lighter flavours for the food so the stronger flavours of the sake can stand out more,” he said. Appetisers Simmered Squid, and Scallop Isobeyaki, and Tempura Takenoko and Shin-Tamanegi, both paired with Asahigiku Rei. These two approaches to sake and food pairing was displayed in our first two dishes at the tasting. For the appetiser, Yamazumi served Simmered Squid and Scallop Isobeyaki, pairing it with a cold Asahigiku Rei junmai ginjou. The light and floral character of the sake complemented the lighter seafood flavours well, and even offered a little bit of contrast with the scallops, which were marinated in soy sauce before being grilled with the seaweed, giving it a little more savouriness on the palate. The sake was also paired with the second dish, Tempura Takenoko (bamboo shoot) and Shin-Tamanegi (early harvest onions) from Japan, which are seasonal items for spring. This time, the contrast between the sake and the food was much more pronounced – the tempura had a light, crunchy texture and was served with a condiment of bamboo charcoal salt, which helped to enhance the sweetness of the sake. If guests are not familiar with sake or do not have a clear preference of what sort of sake they like, Yamazumi would suggest starting with lighter-flavoured sake, then gauge the guest’s reaction to it before proceeding with the next one. Yakimono (Braised Cod Fish) paired with Hiokizakura Junmai Ginjo Denso Goriki. According to him, the course we had at Kampachi was designed for diners who are not familiar with sake, or are just casual drinkers. “It’s a more basic fundamental style that I usually start with. Then, when the guest is more familiar with the flavours, I can start giving them more bold pairings,” he said. The next dish was Yakimono Cod that was both steamed and grilled, hence keeping the moisture and softness of the fish. The dish served up a lovely combination of grilled and steamed flavours – the grilled elements were more prominent at the beginning but the soft texture of the steamed meat balanced out the initial grilled notes. It was paired with a warm cup of Hiokizakura Junmai Ginjo Denso Goriki sake, which was more medium-bodied than the first one, with creamier and more savoury rice notes, which helped enhance the fish’s more delicate flavours. Sushi (Toro, Snapper, Sea Urchin, Amberjack and Anago), paired with Izumibashi Junmai Shinriki. – Photos: Glenn Guan/The Star Yamazumi specialises in sushi omakase, so it was natural that our next dish was a plate of sushi, which included toro (tuna), snapper, sea urchin, amberjack, and anago (salt water eel). This time, we got a cold Izumibashi Junmai Shinriki to go with it. This, for me, was my favourite pairing of the four. The sake was a beautifully balanced spirit – on the palate, there is a distinct savoury base laced with hints of floral sweetness, with a long, creamy umami finish that really complements the ingredients. It’s a symbiotic relationship – the sushi helps enhance the umami goodness from the sake tenfold and the sake gives the sushi a lovely creamy sweetness. According to Yamazumi, he personally prefers to choose the sake based on the food he eats rather than the other way around. “I prefer sake that has a cleaner flavour to go with food. Sake that has a sturdier flavour goes with heavier, earthier flavours like miso,” he said. Still, the beauty of food pairings is the chance to explore different things and taste new flavour combinations. So, if you’re interested in exploring the world of Japanese food and sake pairings, this is your chance. Yamazumi’s omakase menu is available from 6pm to 9pm on the following dates and venues: April 19 at Kampachi Plaza33 (Petaling Jaya), April 24 and 25 at Kampachi EQ at Equatorial Plaza, KL (without sake pairing), and April 26 at Kampachi Pavilion KL. The menu consists of five to six courses, with the price ranging from RM400 (without sake) to RM500 (with sake). Guest are advised to book two days in advance on Kampachi’s website (kampachi.com.my) or via Tableapp. Chef Yamazumi Keisuke will be a guest chef at Kampachi for the month of April. [...]
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