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Foods Archives - New Malaysia News

Jakarta bakeries trapped in time
Toko Kue Marga is famous for their picnic rolls, available with beef or ham. — Jakarta Globe pic JAKARTA, July 14 — Although Indonesia’s capital seems to have a penchant for newfangled hybrid food, it will always leave a room for its classic staples, some heavily influenced by Dutch cuisine, especially pastries and cakes like the donut-sans-hole oliebollen and tender, juicy picnic rolls.Some of the bakeries that produce these old timey baked goods prefer to remain obscure, their existence passed through by word-of-mouth only among Jakarta’s true foodies. The French might have come up with the concept of a secret bonne adresse, but Jakartans would like to think they’ve perfected it.But don’t worry if you don’t know where to go and have no one old money enough to ask where these places are, we’ve done all the leg work for you. Step back into tempo doeloe, and grab a bite of a pannenkoek! Toko Kue Marga’s classic Dutch oliebol (‘oil ball’). — Jakarta Globe Toko Kue Marga (Marga’s Cake Shop)Located in a quaint corner of leafy Menteng, one of the most expensive areas in Central Jakarta, you can hear the familiar Paddle Pop tune ringing as you walk through a long driveway to find the entrance.Toko Kue Marga has been around since the early 1970s, and remains unique for its extensive range of baked Dutch-Indonesian goodies that aren’t available anywhere else — or at least no one else makes them as good.One of them is a traditional Dutch treat called oliebol, that literally translates into “oil ball.”Marga’s oliebol is airy and chewy, almost like a giant donut without the hole in the middle, with a dusting of icing sugar on top.If you keep nibbling, you will find a fragrant mix of crunchy apples and raisins cooked in cinnamon and sugar inside. It’s like finding a treasure inside a ship already filled with gold.Pro tip: Get some to take away and refry the oliebollen at home, in butter preferably, until the outside is crispy and browned. Double the olie, double the goodness! Toko Kue Marga’s majestic beef picnic roll. — Jakarta Globe The best part of eating your favourite food is sharing it with people you care about. Marga’s golden-brown crispy picnic roll is enough for at least five people, and it comes with either ham or beef stuffing.The buttery inner dough is impressively stuffed with meatloaf, half a boiled egg and a cheese-mayonnaise spread — a visual that resembles a successful Tetris game.This bakery carries many childhood memories for both Maria and her husband, who grew up around the area.They both knew the original owner Marga, who passed away in 1997.“From back then until now, it hasn’t changed a bit. Still only accepts cash too!” Maria laughs while recommending her favourite dessert, pannenkoek, a cross between a pancake and a crepe. The thick cream in the stuffed crepe is similar to what you can find in a klappertaart (a Dutch-Manado coconut soft cake).Address: Jalan Cimahi No. 8, RT5/RW4, Menteng, Central JakartaOpening hours: 9am-5pmContact: (021) 31928034 Martha Cake Shop’s signature mocca (mocha) nougat cake. — Jakarta Globe Martha Cake ShopEver since Oma Martha (Grandma Martha), now 72 years old, opened the cake shop in 1976, the business has been family run.An extension of Oma’s house, the entrance of the bakery is a small side-door that expands into a whimsical garden trail, complete with a mini fountain. Unless you’re in the know, it will be a bit difficult to find.The cake shop is adorned with black, white and gold aesthetics, an extensive renovation three years go making it feel a little like a high-end bakery in the upper west side of Los Angeles.Once you try their Mocca Nougat cake, it becomes clear why this is their bestseller. The mocca cake is soft and not too sweet, the vanilla flan (custard) in between the cake pieces is cold, soft and thick and the outer layer of caramelised nuts (nougat) have a bit of a chew to it to contrast with the soft inside. Martha Cake Shop’s other signature, dark chocolate cake. — Jakarta Globe Their other bestseller, the dark chocolate cake, is equally as fluffy and light as its mocha counterpart. A velvet layer of pure dark chocolate surrounds the cake, not to be mistaken for cream. This concoction has a bit of a jiggle to it, almost like a thick pudding. Decorated with asymmetrical whipping cream circles, it is topped off with bright red maraschino cherries.Because the cakes do not contain any preservatives, it is recommended that they are consumed within a week. But believe us, they won’t last that long.Despite not having a sit-down area, Martha’s Cake Shop never had a problem selling out. In the one hour The Jakarta Globe was there, the phone was ringing off the hook as customers after customers call to place an order in advance, in fear of their favourites getting sold out.Address: Jalan Jambu No. 33, Menteng, Central JakartaOpening hours: 9am-5pmContact: (021) 3143567 Sprightly 70-year-old Annaning Widodo opened her Benhil cakery in 1977. — Jakarta Globe Maison AnnalitaAnnaning Widodo, the owner of Maison Annalita in Benhil, Central Jakarta, is a spry 70-year-old who has been managing the cake shop since she opened it in 1977. When she first started, she was her own employee.“I had to wake up at 2am and made sure by 5am everything was baked and out of the oven. I had to continue baking in the evening because people would buy everything by 5pm,” Anna reminisced.Maison means “house” in French, a name that was given by her older sibling who was studying in France at that time.Known for their ice cream tarts, Anna tells us a fun fact of how the original Dutch spelling of the word “tart” actually included two ‘As,’ but no one says it like that anymore. Maison Annalita is known for their ice cream tarts. — Jakarta Globe Some of Anna’s staff call h [...]
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More than five decades of frying up char koay teow at Siam Road
The famous Siam Road char koay teow. — Pictures by K.E.Ooi GEORGE TOWN, July 15 — More than 50 years ago, Tan Chooi Hong was just a helper at a hawker stall when he decided to try coming up with his own version of char koay teow.Over the years, through trial and error, Tan perfected his koay teow (flat rice noodles) frying skills as he travelled around George Town in his push cart selling the dish.“I can’t remember when I started my own stall but it has been many years, most probably over 50 years,” he said. Tan Chooi Hong frying up char koay teow at his stall in front of the coffee shop he and his son just opened along Siam Road. He said he learnt to fry koay teow on his own so that he could start his own stall.“Those days, I didn’t have anyone to teach me, I had to learn to do it on my own,” he said.At some point over the years, Tan chose to be based on Siam Road and Anson Road.He would be at Siam Road from noon to evening and at night, he’d move the stall to Anson Road.Up to about 10 years ago, Tan’s stall was just one of many other char koay teow stalls all around George Town.In the past, he would stay open till 11pm with hardly any crowd. It was only after Tan’s stall became so well-known that he frequently sold out by 6pm; only then did he stop operating till late night. The Siam Road char koay teow stall in front of their own coffee shop along the same road. His meteoric rise to fame in these recent years, mostly due to social media and word-of-mouth, was something unexpected for the 77-year-old.“The crowd has been crazy,” he said, shaking his head in disbelief.Tan also used to tell his customers to stop spreading the word about his stall — popularly known as the Siam Road char koay teow — because he can’t cope with the crowd.Early this year, Tan closed his stall to take a long break. Rumours were flying about his health and many believed that he had finally retired.It turned out though that the break was so Tan’s son, Kean Huat, could look for their own place instead of remaining by the roadside. The Siam Road char koay teow uses charcoal fire which lends a smoky layer to the fried noodles. On July 6, the famous Siam Road char koay teow opened for business at their new coffee shop, just a few metres from their previous spot by the road.Today, Chooi Hong and Kean Huat take turns to fry the koay teow. “We now take turns so we both can rest in between,” he said.Chooi Hong’s stall was ranked 14th in the top 50 list at the World Street Food Congress 2017 in Manila.Unlike many other stalls that have switched to gas, the Tans still use charcoal fire for the char koay teow which gives the noodles an added smokiness.Those who want to try his char koay teow will have to be prepared to wait upwards of three hours as the queues are phenomenal.The Tans’ coffee shop also has a laksa stall. Tip: Have some laksa while you wait!82, Siam Road,George Town.Time: 12pm-6pmClosed on Sundays and Mondays. [...]
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Chinese-style Steamed Eggs by Chef Zam
Easy and quick Chinese-style steamed eggs It’s one of those days where you’ve got a nice pot of steaming hot rice all freshly cooked and ready, but have no idea what to eat with it. How about making some Chinese-style steamed eggs? It’s very easy, fairly quick, and only requires a few ingredients you probably have stocked in your fridge already. All you need is a bowl and zero cooking, as long as your rice is still keeping warm in its pot. Ingredients 2 eggs 1 spring onion 1 red chili 1/8 tsp (a couple of dashes) black pepper ½ tsp (a dash) soy sauce 1 tsp water Making Chinese-style steamed eggs Crack both eggs into a small clean bowl. Chop your spring onion small. Slice red chilies thinly. You can deseed them first if you don’t like your dishes too spicy. Add some black pepper, followed by a dash of soy sauce. Finally, just a little bit of water. With a fork, beat all the ingredients until they are thoroughly combined. Open the lid of your rice cooker and place the bowl of eggs over the top of your rice. Close the lid and leave for 10 minutes. That’s it! After 10 minutes, your Chinese style-steamed eggs are perfectly cooked from the heat of the rice cooker and is ready to eat. Extra tips As long as your rice cooker is big enough and you can still cover the lid of your rice cooker, you can double or triple up this recipe using a larger bowl. However, if that is not the case, using a regular steamer will also work! Just let the eggs cook covered in a steamer for about 10 minutes or until completely cooked through. Steamed eggs are best served hot. This recipe for Chinese-style steamed eggs is perfect for one. For more details on how to prepare steamed eggs, check out my YouTube video or watch it below. I’ve also shared a few more egg recipes that I hope you will enjoy.   French Fold Omelette by Chef Zam How to Cook Scrambled Eggs Like a Chef Sunny Side Up by Chef Zam   Video courtesy of Dapur Chef Zam. The post Chinese-style Steamed Eggs by Chef Zam appeared first on Butterkicap. [...]
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What Chefs Cook At Home: Simple Thai dishes from Chef Korn of Erawan
In Malaysia, few Thai restaurants have found quite the fame and success that Erawan has. The restaurant has accolades aplenty – last year, it was named one of Kuala Lumpur’s best restaurants by CNN Travel and was also awarded the Thai Select Premium (which indicates 5-star excellence or higher) seal of approval from Thailand’s Ministry of Commerce, the only Thai restaurant in Malaysia to be honoured with this recognition. Much of the restaurant’s success is linked to the culinary prowess of chef Trakool Yodsuk, better known as Korn. Chef Korn is a Thai native who learnt how to cook authentic Thai food in his own home where talent was aplenty – his grandmother even cooked for King Rama VII! “I thought everyone in Thailand knew how to cook. Which is why I felt like I was nothing special! It’s only later that I realised that a lot of people don’t cook,” he says. Korn’s tutelage happened organically. He learnt how to identify many basic Thai ingredients from their taste and texture, or as he puts it – “My mum would say, ‘Korn, go and get holy basil!’ And I would say ‘Which one is that, mum?’ And she would say ‘Go and smell lah!’ So I would go and smell the leaves,” he says, laughing at the recollection. At Erawan, Chef Korn meticulously prepare his dishes from scratch, but at home he cooks simply. Over the years, Korn has refined both his olfactory capabilities as well as his palate and continues to be committed to producing high-quality meals. He is fastidious about every component being done to perfection at Erawan. “When I cook for customers, I need to make sure everything is alright – I need to be hands-on with everything,” he says. Which also explains why many things at Erawan are made from scratch – from the green and red curry pastes to the roasted nuts and chilli flakes. “It’s a lot of work and a lot of preparation but good food must come from scratch, you cannot cheat customers,” he says earnestly. Korn is particular about making all the elements at Erawan from scratch, including curry pastes like the one which forms the cornerstone of the green curry with Kobe beef. This sincerity is reflected in the food at Erawan – the green curry with Kobe beef, for instance is revelatory. Korn lightly sears the beef before incorporating it into the curry, which is rich, aromatic and bursting with flavour. The beef is a star in its own right – silken soft and petal-tender. Korn is also particular about the need to balance flavours perfectly in his dishes. So you’ll find a nimble juggling of sweet, sour, spicy and fresh flavours in the restaurant’s seafood salad which is bolstered by fresh lemongrass, shallots, mint leaves and coriander. “The salad is very light and refreshing, because we don’t like flavours overpowering the ingredients, we want the taste of the original ingredient like prawns and squid to be present. So everything else cannot be too sour or salty,” he says. The key to Erawan’s seafood salad is balancing its sweet, sour, spicy and fresh flavours. Interestingly, although Korn is meticulous about everything that goes into the meals at Erawan, his approach to home-cooking is incredibly laidback. He even advocates using ingredients like tinned sardine (sure to induce gasps of horror from regular patrons of Erawan!). “A lot of people want to know what I’m eating at home. And I say, ‘Don’t expect me to be eating very fancy food – only my customers have the benefit of that,’” he says. Korn also emphasises that like most chefs, he is exhausted after a day of cooking in the restaurant and the last thing he wants to do is cook another elaborate meal at home. Chef Korn confesses that he is often too tired to cook at home! “After a heavy day of work, where got mood to cook? I’m very tired, that’s why I cook very cincai and very simple. I want to rest more than I want to cook. Sometimes I just open a can of sardines and eat that,” he says. As Korn is currently on a diet, his go-to recipes are classic Thai staples that are light and low-calorie. “When I go out, I tend to eat oily food, so when I have a chance to cook, I need to cook healthy things for myself. Also I get people telling me, ‘You put on weight ah.’ And I’ll think ‘Ah, time to go on a diet,’” he says, laughing. Korn’s pon plaa tu (mackerel dip) represents his ideal vision of a light, healthy meal. Essentially a sumptuous fish-tinged dip that can be eaten as an accompaniment to vegetables, spread on bread or even smeared on salad leaves and folded into a wrap, pon plaa tu is also incredibly easy to make. “This is at the root of Thai home cooking. Every Thai house must have dip and vegetables. And it’s quick and simple to put together,” he says. Another meal that Korn has been making a lot of is geang som (clear and sour red curry), a light broth that has a lovely mixture of spicy-sour flavours. “This one is low-fat – it doesn’t even have any coconut milk in it. You can dump all your favourite vegetables in it or add some seafood. And it keeps for days!” he says. Given Korn’s passionate love for Thai food (both at home and in the restaurant) it isn’t surprising to learn that he wants to open a Thai cooking school in KL soon, where he will share all the recipes he has learnt over the years. “I want to share in a real, good way. I am very happy to have people learn from me and go out and have the skills to make original Thai food, not learn one month here, one month there and call themselves experts on Thai food!” he says. GEANG SOM (CLEAR AND SOUR RED CURRY) Serves 4 For the red curry paste 10 to 15 large dried chillies, de-seeded and soaked until soft 1 tsp salt 8 shallots, chopped 2 tsp shrimp paste For cooking 200g fish of your choice, cut into pieces (prawns, squid or even canned sardine can be used too) oil, for deep-frying 3 cups water 500g mixed vegetables (lotus root, radish, long bean, carrot, [...]
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Popularity of gin expected to continue into 2021, says report
At the centre of the boom is Europe, with sales in Spain cruising past the five million nine-liter case point, driven by interest in flavored gins, says the report. — AFP pic NEW YORK, July 21 — Europe is leading the global thirst for gin, according to a new industry report. New research from industry publication just-drinks and market research group IWSR predicts that the rate of global growth for gin sales is expected to expand into 2021.In 2017, global sales of gin rose by seven per cent compared to the previous year, up to nearly 35 million nine-liter cases. Of the top 50 markets, 39 posted gains, 19 of these in the double digits. At the centre of the boom is Europe, with sales in Spain cruising past the five million nine-liter case point, driven by interest in flavoured gins, says the report.Sales also rose in the UK, Germany, Italy and France.The one major Western market to buck the trend is the US, where sales declined by 10 million cases. — AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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Chef Zam: The More He Does, the More He Learns
Zamzani Abdul Wahab, or Chef Zam as he is more popularly known as, is undoubtedly one of Malaysia’s most recognized and respected celebrity chefs. Despite his prolific career as an educator and Chef for more than twenty years, this Professor’s career path began quite by accident. “I didn’t do quite well in school. I was very playful and I didn’t like school that much because I was bullied.” Chef Zam had to sit twice for his SPM examinations as he failed mathematics the first time around. “During my time, if you failed mathematics, you couldn’t go to any local universities or colleges, so I had to retake my SPM.” After passing his SPM the second time around, Chef Zam applied to further his studies in UITM. “The only two courses that I was eligible to apply for was a Diploma in Secretarial Science or a Diploma in Chef Training. At the time, I was already exposed to the chef and hotel life because when I was 16, I used to go to Pantai Primula Hotel in Kuala Terengganu every day as my friend had a hair salon there. I would see the chefs rolling out the food trolleys and setting up for events and functions. I had no other ideas and that was the only thing I was familiar with, so I applied to enroll into UITM and I got accepted.” Not what he was expecting Chef Zam laughs at his naivety as a fresh student. “Nobody explained to me what a Diploma in Chef Training was all about. My assumption was, upon graduating, I would be an Executive Chef. I didn’t know any better.” He remembers his first class clearly. “I had to stand for six hours and it was really killing me. I hated it, it was very tiring.” Chef Zam also did not enjoy some of the tasks he was given. “Geli alsolah to filet the fish. Chicken I had no problem with, but I never liked to filet fish, but tutup matalah. I did what I had to do.” Nobody explained to me what a Diploma in Chef Training was all about. My assumption was, upon graduating, I would be an Executive Chef. I didn’t know any better. He knew he wasn’t the brightest student in class, so when the young Zam scored well in Fundamentals of Food during his very first semester, outdoing even the best student in his class, he was surprised, to say the least. “I showed my test paper to some of the other lecturers and they told me, ‘Eh, you can study lah.’” It was the first time it occurred to Chef Zam that this was something he could be good at. “That really opened my eyes. From then on, I soared. I didn’t miss any classes, even when I was given an MC for being sick. I would still struggle to go for classes because I didn’t want to miss anything.” Industrial placement Despite doing well during the first semester, things were not all rosy for Chef Zam. After one semester, he was sent out for his first industrial placement. “My first training outlet was at KL Hilton on Jalan Sultan Ismail. On the first day, the HR Manager took us around and then placed us in our respective outlets. I got Muslim Kitchen, with the lantai basah and uniform ketat, and my shoes were ketat. We didn’t have kitchen clogs, so I wore what I had.” One of his first tasks was to slice sotong rendam. “Coming from Terengganu, I’d never seen that kind of sotong, we only ate fresh sotong. ‘What is this?’ I asked them, and they said, ‘Sotonglah’. ‘Sotong so big ah? Why so liat ah?’ I had to potong it for sambal tumis, and as it was a five-star hotel, I had to potong kilos and kilos and kilos. They gave me a cleaver, and your hand would hurt after a few kilos.” They gave me a cleaver, and your hand would hurt after a few kilos. Chef Zam also had the classic experience of having to peel onions. “We had to peel bags and bags of onions. I couldn’t stand, so I took a periuk to sit on and peeled them. After awhile I got the hang of it, and became really engrossed. Macam Melayu kata, dah ralik. “But I did not complain, I did it. I was lucky because most of the Chefs in Muslim Kitchen were seniors in their late 30s and 40s, and they treated me like their son. They let me cook, and they ajar I. I remember them, Kak Nisah, Abang Wahab, they really had the patience to teach me.” But I did not complain, I did it. The best experience Chef Zam counts his lucky stars for having the opportunity to experience the other outlets at the already established KL Hilton as well. “Most of the kitchen staff were seniors, so they had the patience to teach and nurture us. My favourite department was pastry. Trainees don’t get to decorate cakes for the cake counter, but because they could see my passion and interest, they let me try and I was able to do it.” He fondly remembers being allowed into the chocolate room, where no other staff was allowed into. “I saw them tampering chocolate for the first time. I didn’t get to make any, but I got to eat lah. And I loved the chocolate room because it was cold. I think that’s partially why I like pastry, because other kitchens panas,” he laughs. The young Zamzari returned to UITM for another semester of theory and practical. For his final two semesters, he was sent to Pelangi Beach Resort Langkawi and Hyatt Regency Kelantan. There, he was included in big events despite just being a trainee. “There was a German Chef and he taught me how to cook and carve meat. I was always placed at the buffet counter to carve because I would talk to people, they called me buffet punya PR. I enjoyed it!” Chef Zam also recounts an embarrassing experience while he was clearing the buffet. “I angkat the mesen ais kacang, and the floor was wet. Jatuh! The Executive Chef came running. I was scared that I dropped it, plus malu some more. But when he came to me, he wasn’t angry, he was concerned. I remember that. He taught me how to work systematically, [...]
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5 Ways to Improve Heart Health
There’s a lot we can do to improve our heart health and give it a little extra love — it’s crucial to protect your bodies’ most important muscle. About one in four people die of heart disease every year — in fact, it’s the number-one cause of death among women and men (7). Scary I know, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take action into your own hands when it comes to your diet, lifestyle, and mental/emotional/spiritual wellbeing. To help you feel empowered to take charge of your health, I’m pointing out the best ways to boost your heart health so you can live happier and healthier — with a strong heart. Implement these tactics into your own life with the easy applications I explain and know you’re doing your heart some good with these strategies. What Does the Heart Do? The heart’s biggest responsibility is to pump blood throughout the body through the circulatory system, giving oxygen and nutrients to all our tissues and removing any waste or carbon dioxide. A normal heartbeat means blood is pumped at a regular, controlled pace throughout the body, thanks to the body’s natural pacemaker known as the sinoatrial node. The human heart is an organ that pumps blood throughout the body via the circulatory system, supplying oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The most common type of heart disease, known as coronary disease, is a disorder in the blood vessels of the heart (8). It can increase the risk of heart attack, which occurs when an artery gets blocked and cuts off oxygen and nutrients going to the heart. What are the Leading Causes of Heart Disease There are two types of heart disease risk factors: those you can’t control and those you can. The former includes a family history of heart disease and age, which becomes at risk factor at 55 for women and 45 for men (8). As far as your lifestyle and what you can control, a few things to note that up your risk of heart disease: smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol (the top three lifestyle risk factors), being overweight or obese, physical inactivity, and diabetes (8). An unhealthy diet (including eating foods high in trans fats and saturated fats, and having lots of salt), as well as excessive alcohol intake, can also up your risk, according to the CDC. If you can check off a few of these factors, then that increases your risk even more. To help you form a healthier, heart-happy lifestyle, check out concrete ways to decrease your risk below. How to Protect Your Heart Health 1. Exercise Often For Heart Health Staying active isn’t just about burning calories, but keeping your body healthy and your mind happy, too. One recent study says that even if heart disease does run in your family, exercise is your best defense (1). While the research doesn’t point out exactly what type of exercise is best or how much, it does mention that cardiovascular fitness (say, running, walking, or biking), as well as grip strength and just more physical activity each day, will help your heart. In fact, more of each of these types of movement will reduce your risk of heart attacks and strokes. Try taking more walks throughout the day, even if it’s a casual stroll around the block after dinner. You can also try a HIIT workout or high-intensity interval training, which involves doing short bursts of all-out effort, followed by brief rest periods. Read more about it here. More on Plant-Based Eating What is a Plant-based Lifestyle? 10 Plant-Based Proteins You Should be Eating Here's How to Eat Plant-Centric 2. Follow a Plant-Based Diet For Heart Health Yes, your food choices can affect your heart, and as you know at NS, we’re major proponents of following a plant-centric meal plan. Research shows that the antioxidants and other ingredients in a produce-heavy diet protect against coronary artery disease, or damage or disease in the heart’s main blood vessels (3). While you can still occasionally enjoy meat, especially if you really enjoy it, your main goal for a plant-based lifestyle is to get lots of vegetables and fruit throughout your day, as well as whole grains, nuts, and legumes. Read about specific ideas for plant-based diets in this story, where you’ll also find ideas for meals. Also, here are a few of my very favorite recipes to replace a few typical animal products: Tahini Miso Covered Cauliflower Steaks The Best Black Bean Burger Vegetarian Meatloaf Classic Cashew Cheese 3. Eat More Nuts For Heart Health I love nuts of all kinds, so I’m always happy to know that this healthy fat- and protein-filled foods help improve heart health, not to mention taste delicious and keep you feeling full. One major study linked eating nuts to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as coronary heart disease (4). Though any nuts will fit the heart health bill, researchers specifically suggested eating a serving of peanuts and tree nuts two or more times a week and walnuts one or more times a week. They found doing so was associated with a 13% to 19% reduction in cardiovascular disease risk, and a 15% and 23% lowered risk of coronary heart disease. Of course, a handful of nuts works well as a simple snack (try this spicy sweet nut and seed mix for added flavor), but you can also add them to main meals. Here are a few of my favorite recipes, featuring nuts: Chocolate Cinnamon Walnut Chili Apple Ribbons with Basil Walnut Pesto 10-Minute Peanut Stir Fry 6 easy ways to improve your heart health! #nutritionstripped Tweet 4. Drink Some Coffee For Heart Health Sipping a cup of caffeine in the morning won’t just give you a jolt of adrenaline to wake up, [...]
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After KL in 2016, Starbucks to open first US store for deaf
Starbucks is to open its first signing store in the US. — Picture courtesy of Starbucks WASHINGTON, July 20 — Starbucks has announced plans to open its first signing store in the US for customers who are deaf and hard of hearing.Due to open in Washington DC this October, the store will offer a customized store format that facilitates accessibility and employment for those who are deaf and hard of hearing, the company says.All 20-25 staff will also be fluent in American Sign Language.The US store will be modeled after the first Starbucks signing store which opened in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in 2016.Earlier this spring, Paris saw the opening of Joyeux (which means joyful in French), a new café staffed by cooks and servers with Down syndrome, autism and other cognitive disabilities. — AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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Sunny Side Up by Chef Zam
Sunny side up perfection Here in Malaysia, cooking eggs sunny side up is also known as telur mata kerbau or telur mata lembu, literally translated as cow’s eye eggs! Maybe because the eggs, when cooked, look like cows eyes, although one with yellow pupils! This method of preparation is one of my favourite ways of eating eggs and it only requires two ingredients to make: eggs and butter, or oil if you prefer. I especially like to eat these fried eggs with nasi lemak. You know that moment when cut into the yolk and it oozes and soaks into the rice… and then scooping it out with some anchovy sambal… mmm perfection! Let me show you how it’s done. Ingredients 2 eggs 1 tsp butter or oil Making sunny side up Crack two eggs in a small bowl. Heat butter on medium low heat in a small pan or skillet. You don’t need too much, just a little bit will do. Once the butter has melted and the pan is hot, carefully slide the eggs into your pan. If your pan is hot enough, the areas of the egg whites touching the pan will start to cloud over quite quickly. If you need to, increase the heat to medium. Let the eggs cook for about 1 to 2 minutes. There is no need to touch the eggs or push them around in the pan. Your eggs are ready when the whites are solid and completely cooked through. The perfect sunny side up has a firm white but soft yolks. Once your eggs are cooked, gently slide them off from the pan onto a plate. Serve immediately. Extra tips If you prefer you like your yolks more thoroughly cooked, cover your pan with a lid while the eggs cook. The trapped heat will help cook your yolks. If you’re serving these eggs to guests as part of a meal, fry your eggs one by one. It will look a lot nicer when serving. If you’re eating the eggs on your own, then cook them two by two. You’ll notice that there’s a difference when using freshly bought eggs compared to eggs that have been sitting in the fridge for a week or more. The structure of the egg whites are a lot looser in older eggs, while fresher egg whites have more structure and may not spread in the pan as much. They both still taste the same though! This will be especially noticeable if you’re frying the eggs one by one in a larger pan. Let’s have some sunny side up for our meal today! And you can definitely have it on its own for breakfast too. Besides nasi lemak, it also goes well with mee or nasi goreng. Try it! For more details on how to prepare this dish, check out my YouTube video or watch it below. I’ve also shared a few more egg recipes that I hope you will enjoy.   Chinese-style Steamed Eggs by Chef Zam French Fold Omelette by Chef Zam How to Cook Scrambled Eggs Like a Chef   Video courtesy of Dapur Chef Zam. The post Sunny Side Up by Chef Zam appeared first on Butterkicap. [...]
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French Fold Omelette by Chef Zam
These fancy French fold omelette will impress your guests! If you’d like to impress a guest, your family or just indulge yourself a little, try making a French fold omelette for breakfast instead of the usual omelette. I know it sounds incredible fancy and terribly difficult to make, the truth is, however, it is actually very simple. And I’ve put together a step-by-step recipe and video to show you how it’s done. Fluffy and tasty, you may not want to go back to making regular omelettes after making a French fold omelette! All you really need is an electric handheld whisk to help make life (and preparing this omelette) just a little bit easier. Ingredients 2 eggs 1/8 tsp (pinch) salt 1/8 tsp (pinch) black pepper 1/8c milk 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil 4 tsp butter 2-3 tbsp finely grated cheese of your choice, like cheddar, parmesan, mozzarella, etc Equipment Electric handheld whisk Making French fold omelette Crack two eggs in a mixing bowl. Using a handheld electric whisk, whisk eggs until they are bubbly. Add salt and pepper and continue whisking until eggs become very foamy. Next, add milk. Continue whisking until the foam is sponge-like and thick, and has increased to about two to three times the original volume. Heat extra virgin olive oil on medium-low heat in a medium-small heavy bottomed pan or skillet. Once the oil is a little hot, gently pour in the whisked eggs. Let it settle to cover the entire pan and do not fiddle with the omelette as it cooks. When large bubbles start to form on the surface of your omelette, drop one teaspoonful of butter on each four corners of the pan, using a spatula to lift up the edges of the omelette and letting the butter slide underneath. After 20 to 30 seconds or once the butter is completely melted, use a spatula to lift an edge of the omelette. If it releases easily and looks nice and golden brown, your omelette is almost ready. Let it cook a little longer if it isn’t. Sprinkle a generous amount of your favourite grated cheese all over the surface of the omelette. Let it melt just a little. Remove pan from the heat and, working cautiously as the pan is hot, bring it towards a large plate. Using a spatula to assist, gently slide half the omelette onto the plate. Then, let the rest of the omelette fold over onto itself, using the spatula to help control the fold so your omelette doesn’t break apart or slides flat. Voila! Your French fold omelette is ready! If you like, garnish with a little bit of parsley, or perhaps even more cheese. And because we’re Malaysian like that, how about a little bit of tomato ketchup or chili sauce on the side? Serve while still hot. Extra tips If you have more than one person to serve, make this omelette one by one according to per person’s serving. Trying to make a larger version of this omelette and folding it out onto the plate will get tricky, especially if you’re a beginner. If you don’t have an electric whisk, you can also use a regular stand mixer with the whisk attachment, but you may have to lift the bowl towards the whisk so it reaches the bottom of the bowl as well. I don’t recommend using a manual whisk unless you are very strong and fast as you may need to whisk for quite a long time. Bon appétit! Aren’t you impressed with how easy it is to make this French fold omelette? These eggs are so fluffy and moist and eating it will make you imagine you are sitting in your balcony in Paris, overlooking the Eiffel Tower. Ooh la la! For more details on how to prepare a French fold omelette, check out my YouTube video or watch it below. I’ve also shared a few more egg recipes that I hope you will enjoy.   Chinese-style Steamed Eggs by Chef Zam How to Cook Scrambled Eggs Like a Chef Sunny Side Up by Chef Zam   Video courtesy of Dapur Chef Zam. The post French Fold Omelette by Chef Zam appeared first on Butterkicap. [...]
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Lay's new chips with eight flavours of America (VIDEO)
Lay's Chesapeake Bay Crab Spice chips — Picture courtesy of Lay's NEW YORK, July 20 — From lobster roll to fried pickles, Lay's has developed eight new chip flavours that are supposed to represent the regional flavours of America.As part of its summer campaign “Tastes of America,” Lay's will be introducing a different chip flavor at food festivals across the country with YouTube celebrity Hannah Hart, who first rose to Internet fame with “My Drunk Kitchen” in which she would cook a recipe while getting progressively hammered, as the name suggests.She also hosted I Hart Food on the Food Network in 2017.Here's a look at the eight flavours:Central Gulf: Cajun spice — described as a mix of garlic, paprika, onion and oreganoTexoma, Mountain, SoCal: Chile con queso — flavours of Southwest and Tex-MexMid-Atlantic: Chesapeake Bay crab spice — inspired by crab shacks along the AtlanticHeartland and Mid-America: Deep dish pizza — inspired by the famous Giordano's pizza recipe in ChicagoMidwest: Fried pickles and ranch dressing — a staple of Midwest state fairsNortheast: New England lobster on a buttered rollSoutheast: Pimento cheese — the flavour of sharp cheddar with cayennePacific Northwest: Thai sweet chili — a blend of sweet chili sauce and heat, to pay tribute to the food truck scene of the Pacific Northwest.— AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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How to Cook Scrambled Eggs Like a Chef
Rich and creamy scrambled eggs! Scrambled eggs are one of the easiest ways of preparing eggs. I like mine best when it is not too dry and not too wet, and while I normally have them for breakfast, you can really eat them at any time of the day. They’re very quick to make, and I love having mine with a generous sprinkling of extra black pepper over the top! Let me show you how I make my scrambled eggs – it’s rich and creamy! Ingredients 2 eggs ½ tsp salt 1/8 tsp (dash) black pepper ¼ c milk 1 tsp butter Making scrambled eggs Crack two eggs in a small bowl. Add salt, pepper and milk to the eggs. With a whisk or fork, beat the ingredients until it is very well combined. Heat a small pan or skillet on medium low heat. Add butter until it melts. Pour in the egg mixture into the pan. With a heat-proof spatula, continuously stir the egg mixture as it cooks, scraping the bottom and the sides of the pab and mixing the curdled eggs into the rest of the uncooked eggs. When about half the egg mixture has cooked, turn the heat down to low. Continue stirring until all the egg mixture has cooked, but the eggs are still soft and wet. Serve immediately. Extra tips If you prefer your scramble dryer, continue cooking the eggs until they have reached the doneness you like. However, don’t forget to quickly remove them from the pan as the eggs will continue to cook from the heat of the pan. Always have your plate on standby instead of looking for it when you are done cooking or your scramble will end up too dry. This dish cooks very quickly. Once the egg mixture is in the pan, make sure you continuously stir your eggs or you will end up with an omelette instead! There are many different styles and ways to make scrambled eggs and I hope you like how I make them! For more details on how to prepare this dish, check out my YouTube video or watch it below. I’ve also shared a few more egg recipes that I hope you will enjoy.   Chinese-style Steamed Eggs by Chef Zam French Fold Omelette by Chef Zam Sunny Side Up by Chef Zam   Video courtesy of Dapur Chef Zam. The post How to Cook Scrambled Eggs Like a Chef appeared first on Butterkicap. [...]
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