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Foods Archives - New Malaysia News

Love Food Hate Waste: From tapioca to tapas
In recent decades, the growth of the cities and new housing estates has brought a proliferation of f&b outlets to the Klang Valley and beyond. Traditional kopitiams have gone mod and given birth to franchises all over the country. The third-wave coffee trend brought a rash of cheerful cafes into our neighbourhoods. Even fancy-pants fine dining restaurants moved into the more residential areas. Then came the food truck invasion. We hardly need to travel 200m to find food. Food is everywhere. On TV, food shows are being aired 24/7. It populates our Instagram, Facebook and mobile devices. Our vocabulary has expanded with new words like macaron, cronut, okonomiyaki, bibimbap, iberico and tapas. We are more in touch with food than at any other time in history. Everyone is an expert in food. We know where to find the dirtiest zang zang bao. More of us are more willing to spend more on a restaurant meal. We are more willing to eat out more often. Heck, we’ve even moved meetings from the boardroom to a café nearby. The food show is probably the greatest show on earth right now. On the glitzy side, it looks like food security has hit an all time high – easily available, affordable and pretty good. On the flip side, the side that most diners don’t see, more food gets thrown away every day. And what we don’t realise: We obsess over the looks of our cupcakes more than the taste or nutrition. We are eating more salmon than kembong. Kale instead of kailan. We are cooking less and less. Step back to a post-Merdeka time and I’m in a vegetable plot wielding a watering can. Food security is about growing our own vegetables in the front garden and rearing chickens and ducks for eggs and meat in the backyard. Every good housewife goes to the wet market in the morning and cooks for the family. Supermarkets are not yet born. Eating out is unheard of. Frugality is the biggest game in town and nothing gets thrown away. People collect recyclable items from a pile of rubbish at a landfill at Porto Romano, Albania. Photo: Reuters Looking at the huge mountain of trash that we generate today, I have to think the old way of life is way more sustainable. In my parent’s house, any leftover food was recycled the next day. Excess rice got fried with sambal and egg into aromatic sambal fried rice; leftover fish or meat was shredded and fried with garlic, onion, chillies, etc into a kind of gloubi-boulga, beloved food of baby dinosaurs. Leftover vegetables became party food for the feathered community in the coop, fish bones went to the cats and bones, the family dog. Even used bath water got a second life. The house was built such that the water runoffs could be pooled in a sort of dam aka longkang. This enriched water was then used to hydrate the kitchen garden. The poop from the coop became fertiliser – we didn’t know about composting then or I’m sure my dad would have been a master composter. He was imaginative enough. We didn’t have a toilet upstairs in those days and the golden potty mix was sometimes diluted as the ultimate fertiliser. Perhaps the old house was designed on purpose that way. Needless to say, the garden thrived. We had enough organic vegetables to share with the entire neighbourhood – only we didn’t call it organic then. And they knew how to rotate the different vegetables to keep the soil robust and intercropping to keep the pests away. Although none of us inherited this knowledge, we developed a love and respect for the land and growing a garden. We can all appreciate nature and understand how we – domestic animals included – depend on each other. And we know how much hard work it is to grow food. Potatoes that have been ‘rejected by traditional distribution channels’ are sold at Nous grocery store, in Melesse near Rennes, north-western France. Nous is ‘dedicated to the reduction of food waste’. Photo: AFP While all this was done in the name of frugality, the old way was perfectly right. How did we get from there to being a nation that throws away 15,000 tonnes of food, equivalent to eight football fields, daily. Of this, 3,000 tonnes are food that is still edible and if saved, can feed 2.2 million people three times a day. Of Malaysia’s 31.8 million people, 0.6% (about 200,000) are living below the poverty line; that means the wasted food is enough to feed all the poor in the country. I called up Dr Ainu Husna MS Suhaimi, head of the MYSaveFood Secretariat at the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (Mardi) for some answers. “When I was growing up, my father used to tell me about the difficult period prior to independence. How food was scarce, and how the one meal was often just ubi kayu and ikan masin – tapioca root dug out from the ground and little river fish preserved in salt. “Not many of us went through that as only 6% of the populace was born before independence. But many more of us lived it vicariously through an older member of the family. Our generation gets it that food insecurity is dreadful. To be avoided at all cost.” From that point, improving food security has been an important agenda for the country. Good and nutritious food should be easily available, accessible and most importantly, affordable for all. To this end, the Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-based Industry (MOA) and its agencies such as Mardi, Department of Agriculture (DOA) and the Federal Agricultural Marketing Authority (Fama) have worked to increase food production in Malaysia. Among the strategies taken are the development of quality seeds, breeds and varieties, embracing and developing new technologies, policies and SOPs to increase quality and yield. This is still work-in-progress. Malaysia is not yet self-sufficient in many food commodities. We are in trade deficit and spent RM46.7bil on food imports in 2016. Despite footing so much for food, we then waste a large part of it. “And that is why the work of NGOs such as The L [...]
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Take a peek at the new cookbooks coming from these celebrity beauties
'Whiskey in a Teacup' by Reese Witherspoon. — AFP pic MIAMI, Aug 21 — Aside from being blessed with the beauty gene, what do Chrissy Teigen, Reese Witherspoon and Tiffani Thiessen have in common?All will be releasing new cookbook and lifestyle titles this fall.For Teigen, Cravings: Hungry for More will be her sophomore cookbook.But for Thiessen and Witherspoon, their upcoming titles will mark their debut in the publishing world as authors.You’re going to hear a lot about this trio of books in a few weeks.Here’s a quick preview:Whiskey in a Teacup: What Growing Up in the South Taught Me About Life, Love, and Baking Biscuits, by Reese WitherspoonThe actress, producer and entrepreneur taps into her Southern Belle roots to write a lifestyle book that teaches readers everything from how to hot-roller hair to how to make cheddar cheese biscuits and her grandmother’s fried chicken, as well as throw a Southern-style dinner party. Why the title? It comes from her grandmother Dorothea, who used to describe Southern women as whiskey in a teacup.“We may be delicate and ornamental on the outside, she said, but inside we’re strong and fiery.”Release date September 18, 2018, US$35 (RM143.41)Pull Up a Chair: Recipes from My Family to Yours, Tiffani ThiessenWho would have guessed that Kelly Kapowski was such a whiz in the kitchen? Don’t know the reference?” You’re definitely a younger Millennial or Gen Xer.  Though best known for her roles on hit shows from the1990s like Saved by the Bell (for which she played Kapowski) and Beverly Hills 90210, Thiessen made the transition to food TV host with Dinner at Tiffani’s on the Cooking Channel.Her debut cookbook features 125 family-friendly recipes from the Thiessen homestead, including stuffed French toast, short rib enchiladas, and cream cheese pie.Release date: October 2, 2018, US$30Cravings: Hungry for More, by Chrissy TeigenAfter releasing her first cookery title Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat in 2016, Teigen returns, this time with what you could call a ‘crowd-sourced’ recipe for banana bread.Last fall, the social media maven who boasts more than 10.6 million Twitter followers, launched an appeal for six over-ripened bananas for people living in the Los Angeles area. The request went viral spawning a million tweets and 100,000 Instagram hashtags.The result is “Twitter’s Banana Bread”. Other recipes including French onion soup with croissant croutons, grilled pork banh mi sandwiches, Philly French dip and pad Thai carbonara.Release date September 18, 2018 US$29.99. — AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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8 Lokasi Korban di Lembah Klang untuk Pengalaman Korban Sebenar
Kredit: nurafifi.blogspot.com Tidak pulang ke kampung pada Hari Raya Aidiladha ini? Jangan risau, terdapat beberapa masjid sekitar Lembah Klang yang mengimarahkan suasana hari raya korban dan anda berpeluang untuk menjadi sebahagian dari suasana tersebut. Hari Raya Aidiladha hanya setahun sekali bukan? Oleh itu, jangan jadikan hari raya korban anda hari cuti percuma semata-mata. Gunakan peluang ini untuk memeriahkan suasana di masjid di samping menerima ilmu tentang sambutan Hari Raya Aidiladha.   Tatacara Menyambut Hari Raya Aidiladha Pada pagi Hari Raya Aidiladha iaitu pada 22 Ogos bersamaan dengan 10 Zulhijjah, mulakan pagi anda dengan memandi sunat Aidiladha dan memakai pakaian yang baru dah bersih untuk menunjukkan tanda syukur kepada Allah SWT. Anda disunatkan untuk memakai wangian dan haruman. Sama seperti hari raya puasa, jangan lupa untuk bermaaf-maafan di antara ahli keluarga dan sanak saudara. Setelah selesai, pergilah ke masjid untuk menunaikan solat Aidiladha dan selepas itu, saksikan upacara korban yang berlangsung. Hari raya korban begitu meriah sekali jika disambut di masjid kerana upacara korban sangat menggalakkan gotong-royong di antara masyarakat. Jika anda mahukan sedikit kelainan, jemput menziarahi masjid-masjid ini untuk sambutan Hari Raya Aidiladha yang memeriahkan. 1. Masjid Negara Kuala Lumpur Kredit: trover.com Masjid ini terletak di pusat bandar Kuala Lumpur dan boleh menampung lebih daripada 15,000 jemaah. Lokasinya yang senang dicapai membuatkan masjid ini menjadi tumpuan penduduk di Lembah Klang. Oleh itu, masjid ini memang meriah sekali apabila menyambut hari raya korban yang kadang kala turut disertai oleh orang kenamaan. Alamat: Jalan Perdana, Tasik Perdana, 50480 Kuala Lumpur   2. Masjid Wilayah Kuala Lumpur Kredit: mosquevisit.tk Masjid Wilayah juga tidak kurang popularnya di kalangan penduduk Lembah Klang. Masjid ini merupakan buah idea Perdana Menteri Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamed yang terletak di kompleks kerajaan Jalan Duta. Masjid ini mempunyai konsep seni bina yang sangat menarik. Kubahnya yang berwarna firus memang menyejukkan mata si pemandang. Siapa sahaja yang tidak mahu menyambut hari raya korban di masjid yang cantik sebegini? Alamat: Jalan Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin, Kompleks Kerajaan, 50480 Kuala Lumpur     3. Masjid Putra Putrajaya Kredit: tarekat.org Masjid Putra merupakan salah satu masjid yang tercantik dan terkenal di Putrajaya. Lokasinya yang terletak di sekitar tasik buatan Putrajaya membuatkan masjid ini mempunyai suasana yang menyamankan. Sememannya masjid ini sesuai sekali untuk mereka yang menetap di kawasan Putrajaya untuk menyambut Hari Raya Aidiladha. Alamat: Persiaran Persekutuan, Presint 1, 62502 Putrajaya   4.  Ara Damansara, Petaling Jaya Kredit: Wikimapia Apabila kebanyakan masjid mempunyai konsep seni bina yang Islamik, Masjid Ara Damansara pula mempunyai konsep seni bina yang moden membuatkan masjid ini lain daripada yang lain. Bagi mereka yang menetap di sekitar Petaling Jaya, jangan melepaskan peluang untuk menyambut hari raya korban di salah satu masjid terunik di Lembah Klang. Disamping menunaikan ibadah, anda juga boleh menikmati kecantikan masjid ini. Alamat: 3, Jalan PJU 1/37, Taman Putra Damai, 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor     5. Masjid Darul Ehsan, Subang Jaya Kredit: jais.gov.my Masjid Darul Ehsan yang terletak di SS15 ini juga mempunyai seni bina yang mempunyai konsep moden. Percayakah anda masjid ini dibina pada 1985? Tepat sekali. Banyak perubahan yang dilakukan pada masjid ini sejak tahun lahirnya. Namun begitu, masjid ini masih mempunyai pengunjung setia. Jika anda menetap di kawasan Subang Jaya, jemput hadir ke masjid ini untuk memeriahkan lagi suasana. Tempat letak kereta juga mudah didapati di kawasan masjid. Alamat: Jalan SS 15/2e, Ss 15, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor     6. Masjid Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz, Shah Alam Kredit: Thousand Wonders Masjid yang dibina pada 1988 ini merupakan masjid terbesar di Malaysia dan kedua terbesar di Asia Tenggara. Sangat menakjubkan, bukan? Bukan itu sahaja, masjid ini juga berkonsepkan kubah kaca berwarna biru dan bahagian dalamnya pula mempunyai unsur Melayu. Keunikan seni bina masjid ini menjadikan masjid tumpuan bukan sahaja penduduk Shah Alam tetapi orang yang menetap di kawasan lain. Memang tidak mustahil masjid ini mempunyai sambutan hari raya korban yang sangat meriah! Alamat: Persiaran Masjid St., Seksyen 14, 40000 Shah Alam, Selangor     7. Masjid Sultan Sulaiman, Klang Kredit: langkasa-norul.blogspot.com Masjid Sultan Sulaiman merupakan masjid diraja Selangor yang telah dibina pada 1932 oleh kerajaan British. Walau bagaimanapun, masjid ini baru sahaja dibuka kembali kepada orang ramai pada tahun 2017. Wajah baru masjid ini sungguh mengagumkan walaupun gaya seni bina aslinya dipelihara. Jika anda menetap di kawasan Klang ataupun anda mahukan sedikit kelainan bagi raya haji tahun ini, ayuh menuju ke Masjid Sultan Sulaiman yang mempunyai banyak sejarah. Hari raya korban anda tahun  ini pasti akan menjadi lebih bermakna. Alamat: Jalan Raya Timur, Kawasan 1, 41000 Klang, Selangor     8. Masjid Bukit Indah, Ampang Kredit: mapio.net Jika anda mahukan masjid yang lebih kecil dan mempunyai semangat komuniti, inilah masjidnya! Masjid Bukit Indah bukan sahaja cantik, malah masjid ini juga pengunjung-pengunjung yang setia. Terletak di subbandar, masjid ini tidak sesak dengan orang ramai tetapi masih mempunyai kemeriahan raya haji kerana penduduk-penduduk di kawasan yang terdekat. Alamat: Jalan Bukit Indah 2/10, Taman Bukit Indah, 68000 Ampang, Selangor     Semua masjid-masjid yang tertera di atas akan menyambut hari raya korban dengan melakukan ibadah korban. Dengan mengunjungi masjid, kita berpeluang untuk mengamalkan ibadah disamping menambah ilmu tentang ibadah korban. Sambutan hari raya haji di masjid juga sangat menekankan semangat gotong-royong yang mampu mengeratkan silaturrahim [...]
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What to Eat to Boost Immunity
What we eat—or don’t eat—can affect our immune system. In my video Using the Produce Aisle to Boost Immune Function I profile a study conducted to determine the effect of the consumption of brightly colored vegetables on the immune system. For the first two weeks, the subjects ate basically no fruits and veggies. Then, they drank one and a half cups of tomato juice every day for two weeks, followed by two weeks of carrot juice, and then two weeks of spinach powder. Within just two weeks of a fruit- and veggie-deficient diet, immune function plummeted. However, just one and a half cups of tomato juice a day brought subjects back from the ashes. It didn’t take five servings a day—just one tall glass of tomato juice produced results. The carrot juice alone didn’t seem to help as well, however, nor did the powder equivalent of about one serving of spinach. This tells me two things: how remarkably we can affect our immune function with simple dietary decisions and, not all veggies are alike. When this study was repeated looking at other immune markers, the tomato versus carrot appeared more evenly matched. There is one family of vegetables, however, that we definitely don’t want to miss out on. Inflammation and leaky gut can occur all because of an absence in our diet of AHR ligands—in other words, cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, collards, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli. Do people who eat healthier actually get sick less? Those who eat more fruits and vegetables appear to have a lower risk of getting an upper respiratory tract infection like the common cold, whether they’re otherwise vegetarian or not. Even just one added apple a day may help keep the doctor away. The common cold is usually so innocuous, though, so why not test against something stronger? Researchers have also looked at more serious respiratory infections like influenza. Studying the relationship between various risk factors and influenza-related hospitalizations in the United States, they found that a 5 percent increase in the prevalence of obesity was associated with a 6 percent increase in hospitalization rate. Physical inactivity had worse outcomes, resulting in a 7 percent increase in hospitalizations. Low fruit and vegetable consumption, however, had the most impact, increasing flu-related hospitalization rates by 8 percent. The common cold isn’t always innocuous, though. For instance, a cold during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with a number of birth defects, including anencephaly, one of the worst, which causes a fatal malformation of the brain. More recent data suggest that the cold-related fever is the real culprit, as anti-fever drugs appear able to prevent the possible birth defects caused by the common cold. It’s best, of course, not to get sick in the first place. One thousand women and their diets were followed before and during pregnancy. It was found that “[w]omen who consume more fruits and vegetables have a moderate reduction in risk of [upper respiratory tract infection] during pregnancy, and this benefit appears to be derived from both fruits and vegetables instead of either alone.” Whole fruits and vegetables provide a natural balance of all sorts of things that may improve our immune function in a “complementary, combined or synergistic manner that could account for the protective effect observed from high consumption of both fruits and vegetables”—or maybe that’s the only way they got enough in their diet. The women who appeared protected in this study were eating nearly nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day, compared with only five servings of fruits or four of veggies. This suggests that the arbitrary five- or six-a-day minimum may be insufficient for effective immune function. For example, in one famous study, elderly individuals were randomized into groups that ate either five servings of fruit and veggies a day or two servings a day. The five-a-day group showed an 80 percent improved antibody response to their pneumonia vaccination compared to the two-a-day group. Even though only about 30 percent (12 out of 40 people) of the five-a-day group reached their target levels of servings, they still did six times better than the two-a-day group. But maybe eight, nine, or ten servings a day would have worked even better. Need a reminder about what those protective Ah receptors are? See The Broccoli Receptor: Our First Line of Defense and Counteracting the Effects of Dioxins Through Diet. What’s the best way to prepare broccoli? Check out these videos: Second Strategy to Cooking Broccoli Raw vs. Cooked Broccoli Raw Broccoli and Bladder Cancer Survival Best Cooking Method In late pregnancy, however, women can overdo it. See Caution: Anti-Inflammatory Foods in the Third Trimester. What else can we do to lower our risk of upper respiratory tract infections? See: Can Gargling Prevent the Common Cold? Preventing the Common Cold with Probiotics? Nutritional Yeast to Prevent the Common Cold Kiwifruit for the Common Cold Preserving Athlete Immunity with Chlorella Also be sure to check out my video, Are Happier People Actually Healthier?, which compares people’s resistance to having the common cold virus dripped into their nostrils. In health, Michael Greger, M.D. PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations: 2012: Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death 2013: More Than an Apple a Day 2014: From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food 2015: Food as Medicine: Preventing and Treating the Most Dreaded Diseases with Diet 2016: How Not To Die: The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, and Reversing Our Top 15 Killers [...]
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TokPork: Popping up with delicious eats and pushing entrepreneurship
TokPork’s addictive crispy fragrant pork is served like nasi lemak with their own-made crack chilli sauce. — Pictures by Ham Abu Bakar KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 19 — Good conversations start over great food and drinks. That’s what TokPork’s Leon Sing Foong and Phon Yung Hou believe.In fact, their pop-up eatery was inspired to start people talking about food.“The idea is people eat, socialise and get talking about things like for example, rendang and the possibilities, like a pork version rather than the usual representations,” explained Leon. Interaction with TokPork is also encouraged.Whether it’s a challenge to create a new dish or a collaboration, the duo are very open to ideas. In addition, with the TokPork concept, they also hope to push individuals to become entrepreneurs. The pop-up eatery TokPork was started after one month by Leon Sing Foong (right) and Phon Yung Hou (left). Started in June, TokPork was a eureka moment for Phon. The duo had just finished a basketball game when Phon approached Leon with the idea saying, “Hey dude, I’ve got the best idea... imagine siew yoke and beer!” The excited Leon was all for the idea even when he found out they had to do it themselves, saying. “Dude, I love it. Let’s do it!”When Leon says that, you know it’ll work.He’s the co-founder of job platform GoGet.My and used to run Uber Malaysia. Currently, Leon heads the car-sharing service Socar in Malaysia where Phon also works. Since space is limited, only deep frying is done at Ales & Lagers before serving. Phon also has a background in micro businesses, dabbling in the likes of car rental and food delivery. When he was young, he tells us the story of how his mother would often threaten him, saying, “If you don’t study, you’ll end up being a butcher!”Little did she know, that Phon would start this part-time venture selling pork! And just like a butcher, he is “tok, tok” or chopping slabs of meat on a board, hence the inspiration for their name, TokPork.This venture is in a way, a tribute to their favourite eats. Chilli pan mee. Jasons Food Hall’s simple nasi lemak bungkus. Even the famous Pudu Wong Kee’s melt in the mouth siew yoke. Located on a mezzanine area, the kitchen is a challenge to work in for the tall Leon. The pork wraps use chapatis sourced from The Ganga Cafe. Couple this with Leon’s cooking skills and you have an explosive match of flavours. The enterprising Leon picked up his cooking skills in London. “I’ve always loved food. My brother used to run a fried chicken business in London and I used to help him out.”He also credits his friends who are chefs and bartenders with tips. Previously, he would also hold private kitchen sessions, cooking up food and mixing cocktails.With this concept, the duo approached Kennhyn Ang who runs Ales & Lagers in Publika that serves craft beers, to allow TokPork to do their Friday pop-ups.As space is limited in the kitchen, they had to rethink their traditional siew yoke idea. “Initially we wanted to do siew yoke. but we realised we can’t as by 4pm, it would go all soggy and we don’t have an electric oven. Operationally it was very hard to keep the siew yoke crispy,” explained Phon. The dishes are to be paired with the bottled craft beers like the Kuromame Ale, which comes highly recommended by Leon (left). Ales & Lagers provides a large selection of craft beers that are the perfect companion to TokPork that will start any conversation going (right). Both of them worked hard, spending long hours after work, to come up with an inventive version to suit their situation.After one month of experimentation, they emerged with a winner, known simply as crispy fragrant pork. Rather than roasting the pork belly, Leon would deep fry it. That worked especially when they would steam the pork belly before deep frying.With these cooking methods, the fat became creamy softness while the skin remained beautifully crispy. They serve the slab of meat marinated with five spice powder cut into pieces together with fried peanuts, sliced cucumber, crack chilli sauce, fried garlic and lard fritters! Think of it as their tribute to nasi lemak minus the carbohydrates! Once the pork is deep fried, it's time for Phon to assemble their platter of yumminess. Their addictive chilli sauce is a variation of the recipe Phon’s mum makes for their steamboat dinners. The sauce, Phon elaborates, is made by blending fresh chillies with belacan and kaffir lime leaves; it goes superbly with the crispy fragrant pork to give it a “wow” factor. To keep it fresh, it’s made in a big batch on a weekly basis.As and when, new items are introduced, like their curry pork wraps. Here pork cheeks are cooked under pressure and rendered in bacon fat to give it extra oomph! With a dollop of yoghurt and a little tanginess from a lime, and mango achar, it is all wrapped up with a chapati for a bite-sized winner. As time is limited, the achar and chapatis are sourced from The Ganga Cafe.Sometimes, different variations are served, like their creamier pork belly version. ‘Tok, tok...’ goes the cleaver for their crispy, fragrant pork which inspired their pop-up’s name. Before it’s served, the meat gets a flambe. Or if you prefer to get your fingers dirty (we assure you it’s worth it)... give their slow cooked pork ribs a go. The dry rub is a combination of all things nice like coffee, gula Melaka and five spice powder.The vacuum packed meat is incredibly tender with lots of flavour, thanks to an unusual combination of prawn paste, fish sauce and sesame oil! Again the meat is given the same treatment — steamed for two and a half hours, dehydrated to remove the moisture and deep fried till the top is all charred. Accompanying the ribs is [...]
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Grapefruit Ginger Compote To Put On All The Things
Isn’t it great to have a handful of recipes you can use on everything from breakfast to dessert? Try out this grapefruit ginger compote. This Grapefruit Ginger Compote can be made on the weekend for your meal prep and used from a breakfast topping with porridge to a topping on your favorite coconut milk ice-cream for a little sweet tangy combo. Grapefruits come in several varieties including red, white, and pink — they all taste relatively similar in my opinion, slightly sweet and bitter so you can use whatever grapefruit you have on hand. The Health Benefits Of Grapefruit To Know About For starters, let’s get the most popular component of grapefruit out in the open, vitamin C. In just 1/2 (100g) of a grapefruit there’s around 60% daily value for vitamin C. Obviously depending on our individual needs and health, we may need more vitamin C, but for most of us including something like 1/2 – 1 grapefruit a day will cover your vitamin C needs. In addition, think of all the dark leafy greens and other fruits and vegetables you’re eating on the Nutrition Stripped lifestyle, you’re covered with vitamin C! When you think of lycopene you may think of tomatoes, and yes you’re right, but did you know that pink, orange, and red foods contain this powerful carotenoid phytonutrient? Lycopene, which also contributes to the pinkish color in the fruit, has the highest capacity at fighting free radical damage to cells (1). Eating grapefruit has also been shown to help decrease weight and fat mass in overweight adults and may improve insulin resistance (2)(3). There’s also a lot of buzz when it comes to weight loss and fat loss and eating grapefruit — do you remember the whole grapefruit diet thing in the 80’s and 90’s? Well while I’m sure you can guess, I’m not a fan of that diet, but there are some studies showing grapefruit may reduce body fat in some individuals when mixed with other compounds such as caffeine, grapefruit polyphenols, and other antioxidants found in the berry family of fruits. In addition to this, grapefruit may also increase metabolic rate (i.e. metabolism!), by working on a cellular level increasing the amount of ATP, which is a fancy way of saying “cellular energy”. The Other Half Of The G-Team: Ginger In our article highlighting the best Adaptogens for Natural Stress Relief, we touched on ginger, because it can help calm digestion. Ginger is a root that contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds called gingerols, which have been shown to help fight inflammation with certain cancers such as ovarian and colon cancers, as well as diseases such as arthritis, muscular pain or swelling, and joint pain. It’s been used for thousands of years to treat ailments like colds, nausea, arthritis, migraines, and hypertension. (6) Read more about the studies on ginger and their levels of evidence here. Be sure to search “ginger” here on NS to find all of the many recipes and posts devoted to this powerful adaptogen. The post Grapefruit Ginger Compote To Put On All The Things appeared first on Nutrition Stripped. [...]
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Resepi Nasi Ulam Bunga Kobis Keto
Nasi ialah makanan ruji bagi kebanyakan penduduk di negara Asia, khususnya rakyat Malaysia. Oleh itu, memang tidak menghairankan apabila kebanyakan rakyat Malaysia yang ingin berdiet mencari diet yang tidak mewajibkan mereka untuk berhenti makan nasi. Tapi, adakah cara nak berdiet dengan nasi?   Nasi Ulam Kobis Bunga? Otak manusia senang sahaja nak dimanipulasi. Semuanya bergantung pada mainan visual. Oleh itu, anda perlu menajdi sedikit kreatif. Dalam berdiet, anda hanya perlu menggantikan nasi dengan bahan-bahan yang lebih sihat tetapi kekalkan dalam bentuk nasi. Percayalah, orang yang paling sukar nak tinggalkan nasi pun dapat berdiet dengan cara ini. Puan Roslina Manaf, figura diet ketogenik tempatan, berkongsi resipi nasi diet keto yang bukan sahaja lazat malah mudah untuk disediakan. Perkara yang membuatkan resipi ini berbeza daripada resipi diet lain ialah nasi diganti dengan kobis bunga. Untuk menjadikan hidangan ini lebih sihat, masukkan pelbagai jenis ulam seperti bunga kantan, daun selom, daun selasih, kacang botor dan bermacam lagi ulam yang anda suka dalam nasi yang anda sedang goreng. Mudah dan senang sahaja untuk disediakan. Bahagian yang sukar adalah mencari ulam!   Mari Memasak Anda pasti berasa sangat teruja untuk mencuba resipi ini. Resipi ini dapat menyediakan tiga hidangan. Jika anda mempunyai rakan-rakan yang ingin berdiet, anda boleh memperkenalkan resipi ini untuk menguatkan lagi keazaman mereka untuk berdiet. Apa anda tunggu lagi? Jom ke dapur dan masak! Nilai Nutrisi: 144 kcal 9g  lemak 44g karbohidrat bersih 05g serat 113g protein   Bahan-Bahan 1/2 helai daun kunyit 1 helai daun limau purut 2 helai daun kaduk 1 tangkai serai 2 biji cili padi 4 kacang botol 1 kacang panjang 5 helai daun kesum Bunga kantan (opsyenal) 1/4 sudu teh garam 1 biji bawang merah 3 cawan bunga kobis, diracik 2 sudu besar kerisik 3 biji petai (opsyenal)   Cara-Cara Racikkan bunga kobis dan gaul dengan sedikit garam. Biar selama 5-10 minit dan perahkan air keluar. Letakkan kuali leper di atas penunu dapur. Hidupkan api dan panaskan kuali. Setelah kuali panas, masukkan bunga kobis yang diracik ke dalam dan masak sehingga lembut. Apabila bunga kobis sudah masak, keluarkan dari kuali dan ketepikan. Hiris semua herba dan sayur nipis-nipis dan masukkan ke dalam mangkuk. Masukkan kerisik dan gaul rata. Untuk menghidang, bentukkan nasi bunga kobis menggunakan cawan. Letakkan ulam di tepi nasi bunga kobis.   Tip Untuk tahu nasi bunga kobis sudah masak, nasi bunga kobis akan menjadi lutsinar. Anda boleh masukkan cebisan ikan parang ke dalam kerisik sebagai penambah perisa. Anda boleh menikmati hidangan ini dengan ayam percik ataupun daging panggang. Untuk menyediakan daging panggang, anda boleh mencuba resipi stik daging rusuk panggang keto. The post Resepi Nasi Ulam Bunga Kobis Keto appeared first on Butterkicap. [...]
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Famous Belgium beer bar, Delirium Cafe, is now in Malaysia
The bar has 12 beers on tap, including the world-famous Delirium beers. Rejoice, beer lovers, for one of Belgium’s most famous beer bars, the Delirium Cafe, is now open in Malaysia! Belgium has always been famous for its beer. The beverage is so rooted in the country’s culture that Unesco even added Belgian beer to its list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. From world-famous Trappist  and abbey ales, tasty fruit beers and uniquely flavourful sours, to refreshing blondes and easy wheat beers, there is a Belgian beer for every one and every sort of beer drinker, and now, there is a place in Malaysia where you can get them. Located at Suria KLCC, outside by the lake (look for the giant pink elephant, you can’t miss it), the bar is the 11th Delirium Cafe location globally, and boasts an impressive selection of Belgian beers and traditional Belgian food (make sure you try the fries!). Make sure you try the fries at Delirium Cafe! The original Delirium Cafe in Brussels is famous for having one of the largest beer menus in the world, with more than 2,000 beers listed on its menu, which is almost as thick as a textbook. The KL branch may not have that many, but with 12 beers on tap and more than 80 Belgian beers by the bottle (at the time of writing, with more to be added in due course), many of which are exclusive to the outlet, it does have the most extensive range of Belgian beers in Malaysia. Prices range from RM28-51 for bottled beers, which may not be your typical kopitiam prices. Then again, these are not your typical kopitiam beers – Trappist ales like Orval, Westmalle and Rochefort, for instance, are considered some of the world’s best beers, and Delirium is arguably the only place in KL where you can get them. The bar also serves a comprehensive menu of food, which includes  imported Belgian fries, mussels in broth, beef beer stew, and others. For more information, visit Delirium Cafe Malaysia.   If you can’t find the place, just look for the giant pink elephant. [...]
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To know Malaysia is to love the bunga kantan
If I had to pick only one ingredient to represent Malaysian gastronomy, it would be the bunga kantan. The torch ginger flower has a special place in our collective heart and taste buds, wired into our psyche with our first taste of asam laksa and nasi ulam. Even haters cannot deny its powerful presence. Bunga kantan is what gives many iconic Malaysian dishes their distinctive taste: asam laksa, nonya laksa, asam pedas, nasi ulam, nasi kerabu and the numerous kerabu salads. Unlike the chilli, it is a truly local ingredient. It grows in tropical and sub-tropical regions, from Hawaii to Congo and the Philippines, but it is native to Malaysia and Indonesia. The torch ginger (Etlingera elatior) is one of the rainforest’s most spectacular blooms. The flowers are pink, red or white. The pink variety is the most floriferous and bears more flowers – that’s why it’s more common than the red while the white is quite rare. Market vendors will tell you that the larger redder variety is usually from Indonesia or Thailand. And if you find the bunga kantan hard to come by sometimes, it’s because it has a season of a sort. May is the peak season when it’s plentiful and cheap. From August through October, supply is limited and hence the higher prices. That’s also when you’ll find more red buds in the market. Although the unopened flower, the bud, is the most commonly used part in cooking, the whole plant is edible: leaf, flower, fruit and seed. Its deeper culinary secrets lie with the natives living in and around the rainforest. Torch ginger flowers are pink, red or white. The pink variety is the most floriferous and bears more flowers – that’s why it’s more common than the red while the white is quite rare. In Sarawak, the Kelabits cook with the inner buds of the opened blossom, using it like a vegetable in stir-fries. The leaf can be used in the same way as turmeric leaf. The fruit, known as buah kechala – the Iban name for torch ginger – is also edible and used in cooking. Inside the individual pods that make up the fruit are pulp-coated seeds – like passion fruit pulp – capable of exploding in the mouth with a sour sensation. We call it “bud” but the “petals” that make up the bud are not the actual flower; they are the bracts that protect the tiny true flowers that emerge later, in rings between the rows of bracts over the course of the 50 to 60 days that the plant will take to complete the spectacular blooming ritual. The unopened torch ginger flower, the bud, is the most commonly used part in cooking. In gastronomy its identity is forged mostly in the Malay archipelago, the Nusantara region. In southern Thailand it’s served with nam prik sauce as part of a raw salad (ulam) and spices up khao jam, a rice salad that shares similar roots with the Malaysian nasi kerabu. Chef Korn Yodsuk of Erawan restaurant in Kuala Lumpur considers the bunga kantan more of a Malaysian spice. “We don’t use it a lot in Thai cooking. Just a few dishes in the south make use of the torch ginger; we use it more as cut flowers.” This beautiful flower is associated with love – you cannot deny the phallic shape of the blushing bud. Korn shares that in Thailand the torch ginger is a symbol of cross-cultural love. When parental objections kept a Thai lad and Malay lass apart, the girl famously vowed that even after death, she’d return as a torch ginger flower to wait for him at the border gate. Torch ginger buds are typically finely sliced and eaten raw as part of an aromatic garnish for salads and rice, or tossed into sour soups and curries. It’s traditionally paired with fish and seafood rather than meat, although it makes an inspired pairing with smoked beef or duck. But it’s really fish’s best friend as the citrusy and gingery flavours exalt the taste of fish and mask fishy odours. In the Malay kitchen the bunga kantan is an everyday herb, spicing up hot and sour fish, kerabu salads, herbed rice and laksa. It is regarded as the soul of Peranakan cuisine, lending its nuanced citrusy floral notes to a rich and celebrated culinary tradition. In Indonesia, it’s used as an aromatic and vegetable. Kecombrang finds its way into various salads like urap and pecel. In Bali, kecombrang adds punch to the basic sambal matah dip, the relish at every meal. In Jakarta it animates the street food, rujak. In Singapore it is called “rojak flower” for the same reason. These days, there’s an experi­men­tal spirit in the kitchen and non-conventional ways of using the torch ginger have emerged. Chris Salans of Mozaic in Bali finds that it works beautifully in desserts such as ice cream and sorbet. Dewakan’s Darren Teoh is working to obtain its essential oil for use in tea offerings at his Glenmarie restaurant. “We regularly use it, fresh as well as pickled, like in a prawn umai with herbs and dried coconut.” Perhaps its most exciting use can be found among the city’s innovative bars. At Kuala Lumpur’s cooler bars you don’t ask for a mojito but a bunga kantan mojito. Botak Liquor’s bunga kantan and pumpkin cocktail has been hailed as the year’s most exotic cocktail combo. The laksa cocktail is a popular take – 23aubergine and Lou Shang Bar have their versions. Mixologist Ashish Sharma at the new Bar Trigona at the Four Seasons KL makes sure there’s a torch ginger cocktail on his menu and Jack Rose’s award winning mixologist David Hans sums it up perfectly when he says the bunga kantan is “a signature to local flavour”. All recipes by Julie Wong Genius Sengkuang Calit GENIUS SENGKUANG CALIT This recipe hack lets you prepare a forgotten street snack at home in two shakes. It also gets an update with bunga kantan. 4-5 servings 1 medium sengkuang (yambean or jicama) 100g roasted peanuts, crushed 1 bunga kantan bud (torch ginger), halved and finely sliced aroma paste 3 cubes red preserved beancurd 1 tbsp pure peanut butter 1 tbsp shaoxing rice wine (optional) 1 [...]
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Easy pickings: Champagne harvest starts early
A Bulgarian harvester works in the vineyard of the Champagne house Pommery-Vranken during the grape harvest in Reims August 30, 2017. — AFP pic PARIS, Aug 21 — Champagne's grape harvest kicked off yesterday, about two weeks earlier than usual, with the industry predicting a "very good" vintage of the prized bubbly thanks to ideal weather conditions.The first contingent of the region's army of around 120,000 seasonal workers — all Champagne grapes are picked by hand — got to work in several villages of the region's southern Cote des Bar area.“The remarkable condition of the grapes and ideal weather conditions made starting the harvest early an easy decision,” the Comite Champagne said in a statement.The ideal weather conditions of the spring and summer promise an “excellent 2018 vintage,” said the group, which sets its harvest calendar by sampling the grapes' maturity, alcohol content and acidity.Some producers even jumped the gun, with Champagne Beaufort Reol — an organic vineyard — starting its harvest last Friday.“There were already lots of good, ripe grapes on the ground” as the workers began picking, vintner Jacques Beaufort told AFP.“If I'd waited another week, the harvest would have been ruined.”The schedule will see the region's 300 or so winegrowing villages gradually join the picking through the end of August and up to September 2. — AFP-Relaxnews [...]
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Send in your entries for the second Fay Khoo Award for Food and Drink Writing
“In Penang, the portions are tiny so you can try a million dishes all at once. That’s how I know that I will never be hungry and my heart will always be full….” Renie Leng’s Penang Kitchens cinched the first prize in last year’s inaugural edition of the Fay Khoo Award for Food and Drink Writing. The award, set up in tribute to the memory of writer, food critic, publisher and TV/radio personality Fay Khoo received some 40 entries. They were mostly from Malaysia, but also from writers living in Bangladesh, Britain, Japan and the United States. “They wrote about coffee, supermarkets and farmers, mystery dinner tours, wine semantics, onion and cereal. Spices and gut-busting chillies featured everywhere, but sadly there was only one mention of eating mangoes in a bathtub, naked,” says award organiser Bettina Chua Abdullah in an e-mail interview. “One writer had an uncle who taught her to make toddy when she was 11, and let her taste it too. There were marvellous titles, like ‘What To Cook When Someone Stabs You In The Back’. The entries were a cornucopia of delights to read – a perfectly acceptable start to an award that came together in both sorrow and haste.” A tribute to the life and achievements of writer, food critic, publisher and radio/TV personality Fay Khoo, who died in April 2017 after a battle with lung cancer, the Fay Khoo Award for Food and Drink Writing (thefaykhooaward.com) serves not just as a reminder of Khoo’s dedication and passion to her craft, but also hopes to recognise new and talented voices in food and drink writing. Khoo wrote and edited books, founded a publishing house, contributed to several magazines and newspapers, including The Star, and was a presenter on BFM radio station The second edition of the Fay Khoo Award is open for submissions now; get your entries in by Sept 30 online at thefaykhooaward.com. Submissions must be in English and should not exceed 2,000 words. The award is open to those who are 16 and above, and a citizen or resident of any Asean country. Winners will be announced at the George Town Literary Festival in November. Chua and food/travel writer John Brunton will both return as judges, with a third judge coming in from the chef/restaurateur community. The Fay Khoo Award this year offers two categories: one for personal narrative, the other for reportage. “The entries we received last year were sharply skewed towards the personal narrative. It seemed to suggest that our perception of food writing is solely about restaurant reviews and memoirs. Stories that tackled topics like the fate of the street food experience, the rise of supermarkets, and the role food plays in the identity of a nation – these were fascinating reads. I would really like to see more of these journalistic explorations,” says Chua. Besides the separation of the award into two categories, two food photography workshops – one in Kuala Lumpur and the other in Penang – were held this year. The idea, Chua says, is to evolve into an award for story telling, in different genres, with food at the heart. As for the writing aspect, she says that they are looking for “more creativity, cleverness and freshness of approach” this year, especially in the personal narrative. “It is perfectly fine to write about your favourite restaurant, but you need to be exceptionally skilled at turning a phrase if you are just going to talk about what you ate. You need to take the reader beyond the meal, to infuse meaning and emotion, make the reader care. “Food writing is about the people who grow it, harvest it, cook it, serve it, eat it, reject it, manipulate it, are made happy by it, or die for lack of it,” she says. Last year’s entries were diverse in content and style, and selecting a winner was no walk in the park. But there were a few things that made Leng’s story, which was tagged as a zuihitsu, stand out to the judges. “The zuihitsu is a genre of Japanese literature, and the sensation that the reader feels is that he or she is drifting through the author’s thinking and surroundings. “Renie’s piece, which moves us through a series of Penang kitchens, was transportive. I really did feel as if a butterfly was alighting in different kitchens and dwelt there just long enough. Testament to her skill is that a year on, I still have that sensation when I read it. And there is a sense of rhythm and cadence which is very enjoyable,” says Chua. Not long after the first anniversary of Khoo’s passing, Chua was asked to keep books from Khoo’s library of food literature, which she describes as reflecting an astounding range, from books on culinary artistry, to good food writing. “Fay was a food writer determined to know her craft and her subject, inside out. And that is what I hope for this award, to read work that reflects what Fay herself was: professional, diligent, thorough – and that is beautifully, delightfully, and entertainingly written,” she concludes. [...]
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Hunt for the perfect fried chicken
Korean-inspired Singapore brand 4Fingers tweaks its fried chicken to suit local taste buds. — Pictures by Poh Huai Bin PETALING JAYA, Aug 20 — Who doesn’t enjoy a perfectly fried piece of chicken? With the crunchy layer of skin and batter giving way to soft and juicy white meat, it’s the ultimate delivery vehicle of protein, fat and carbs. From the exciting times of KFC first opening its doors in Malaysia in the 1970s to the proliferation of Korean fried chicken restaurants in recent years, we have been truly spoiled for choice. In this article, we’ll be going through everything fried chicken, from the humble Chinese fried chicken rice stall to the slightly more upscale chains from the United States and everything in between. It’s chicken time!4Fingers is a Singaporean brand that takes its inspiration from the Korean-style fried chicken and tweaks it for local taste. It seems to have hit all the right notes as there is always a queue in front of its outlets. My office is next to a 4Fingers restaurant in Nu Sentral and it’s impossible to eat here at lunchtime unless you plan on going back late to the office. I love the crispy soy garlic wingettes and the delicious skinny fries with powdered seasoning. Price-wise it is similar to Korean fried chicken outlets (which isn’t cheap...) but that hasn’t stopped anyone from patronising the store. Another Singapore brand, Choo Choo Chicken is popular for its ‘Cham Chi Rice Burgers’ and ‘Bulgogi Rice Burgers’. Also originating from Singapore, word on the street is that a Singapore-based Korean teacher started this fried chicken joint called Choo Choo Chicken. So good is business that it has expanded aggressively into Malaysia; why, there are two outlets within 10 minutes of where I stay — one in Puchong and the other in Taipan, Subang Jaya. Here you’ll also find Cham Chi Rice Burgers and Bulgogi Rice Burgers, an interesting combination of seaweed-flavoured rice shaped into patties/buns with kimchi and either tuna or beef in the middle. It’s surprisingly yummy. I like how crispy the fried chicken is too. It’s fried so well you can even nibble on the wing tips if you’re so inclined. Be sure to go for the Buffalo chicken wings (or drums) at Wingstop. Wingstop proudly declares it’s one of the fastest growing fried chicken brands in the United States. It may be popular for its Buffalo chicken wings but I tend to go for the drums. Wingstop has a wide range of sauces you can choose from, including localised options like sambal pedas. Its signature hot sauce — atomic — would come as a disappointment to most Malaysians, especially those who know a thing or two about spicy food. While it’s tasty enough, it wouldn’t register as being anything close to spicy to local taste buds used to the inferno that is cili padi. I love its mango habanero sauce, though. Kyochon is one of the largest fried chicken restaurant chains in Korea. Most Malaysians would be familiar with the name Kyochon. It’s one of the largest fried chicken restaurant chains in Korea and its arrival on our shores a few years ago had been eagerly anticipated. I must admit Kyochon knows what it’s doing. The prices here are reasonable, better than other Korean fried chicken franchises and even some of the local shops owned by expat Koreans. The Honey series is what I usually order — a sweet and savoury treat that comes either as wings or 1/2 chicken. Kyochon fries its chicken only upon order so it’s piping hot and crispy when it hits your table. Don’t forget to order a side of pickles; it’s complimentary but you’d have to ask for it. The vinegar cuts through the richness of the fried chicken so you can eat more without feeling sick. Apart from its crispy fried chicken, Chicken Pop’s butter chicken rice is also a winner. — Picture by Poh Huai Bin Chicken Pop is a new Chinese fried chicken rice establishment, whose decadent butter chicken rice has made it the popular joint that it is. The dish is exactly what it sounds like — a serving of chicken rice topped with a square of melting butter. It’s super rich and sinful but thoroughly satisfying. It’s not something you’d want to order if you’re on a diet, though. Chicken Pop serves whole chicken legs deep fried to a crisp perfection while maintaining a juicy interior. This place also make its own “soy sauce”, a beige concoction that has umami flavour and goes wonderfully with the chicken. I tried asking the friendly owner what it contains but she naturally she didn’t give anything away.Getting there 4FingersNu Sentral, Jalan Tun Sambanthan, Brickfields, Kuala LumpurLRT/MRT: KL SentralFrom the station: 50 metresOperating hours: 10am-10pmChoo Choo Chicken 20, Jalan USJ10/1B, Subang Jaya, SelangorLRT: TaipanFrom the station: 500 metresOperating hours: 11.30am-11pmWingstop Lot G-05, Citta Mall, 1, Jalan PJU 1A/48, Pusat Perdagangan Dana 1, Petaling Jaya, SelangorLRT: Ara DamansaraFrom the station: 600 metresOperating hours: 11am-10pmKyochon 1 Utama Shopping Centre, Lebuh Bandar Utama, Bandar Utama, Petaling Jaya, SelangorMRT: Bandar UtamaFrom the station: 200 metresOperating hours: 10am-9.30pmChicken Pop 9-01, Jalan Kenari 17F, Bandar Puchong Jaya, Puchong, SelangorLRT: IOI Puchong JayaFrom the station: 250 metresOperating hours: 10.30am-9pm [...]
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