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Mother, two sons among seven arrested in Kelantan drug-trafficking probe
Police said the woman and her two sons were arrested by a team from the Pasir Mas Police Headquarters Narcotics Criminal Investigation Department on August 13 at a house in Kampung Tok Buak Tendong, Pasir Mas. — AFP pic KOTA BARU, Aug 15 — A 62-year-old woman and her two sons were among seven suspects detained to facilitate investigations into drug trafficking cases in three separate raids on August 13 and 14.Kelantan deputy police chief SAC Abdullah Mohammad Piah said the woman and her two sons, aged 30 and 22 years, were arrested by a team from the Pasir Mas Police Headquarters Narcotics Criminal Investigation Department on August 13 at a house in Kampung Tok Buak Tendong, Pasir Mas at 11.30pm. “The arrests were made based on public information obtained about the trio’s activities over the last six months.“On inspecting the house, 1,503 grammes of heroin worth RM140,000 was found, believed to have been brought in from Thailand for distribution in Pasir Mas and Kota Baru,” he told a press conference at the Kelantan Police Contingent Headquarters here, today.Abdullah said investigations found the 30-year-old son had two previous records under the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.“The three suspects delivered vegetables to Thailand and the drug supply was brought in separately. They have been remanded for seven days from yesterday to August 20 and are being investigated under Section 39B of the Dangerous Drugs Act (ADB) 1952.Meanwhile, in the second raid carried out yesterday (August 14) on a boat at Tok Bali’s Mega Pengkalan Jetty, police detained two Cambodians, aged 34 and 32 years, and a 30-year-old local man believed to be involved in drug trafficking.“In the raid carried out at 9am, 980 Yaba pills and 17.57 gm of syabu worth RM12,635.50 were found. The supply is believed for distribution to fishermen in the area. The local man had two drug-related records while the two Cambodian suspects had no previous records but tested positive for methamphetamine,” he said.The three suspects were remanded for seven days from today to August 21 to facilitate investigations under Section 39B of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.Abdullah said in the third raid in Kampung Gunung, Bachok police arrested a 29-year-old man and seized 112 yaba pills worth RM1,680.“The arrest was made near Jalan Kampung Bukit Temalong, Gunong and the suspect was remanded for 4 days from today to August 18 and was being investigated under Section 39A (1) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.The total value of drugs seized in the three raids was RM154,315.50, while the value of cash, a four-wheel drive vehicle, car, motorcycles and helmets seized came up to RM107,886, he added. — Bernama [...]
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Women, teens among 16 held for ‘Ah Long’ activities in Sungai Petani
Police said that all the suspects had no previous criminal records and would be remanded for four days from today under Section 5 (2), Section 29 (A) (1), Section 29B of the Unlicensed Moneylenders Act 1951. ― Picture by Hari Anggara ALOR SETAR, Aug 8 —Two women and teenagers were among 16 people arrested for being alleged members of an unlicensed money-lending (Ah Long) syndicate following raids carried out on eight houses in the Sungai Petani vicinity yesterday.Head of the Kedah Commercial Crime Investigation Department (JSJK) Supt Annuar Amri Abd Muluf, said the operations was conducted together with a police team from the JSJK Operations and Technical Assistance Division in Bukit Aman at 8.30 am“During the operations, police arrested 14 men and two women aged between 15 and 49, and seized eight vehicles and items used in the illegal money-lending scheme.“Also seized were cash amounting to RM9,733 and SGUS$3,000 (RM9,079), 29 ATM cards, 16 cheques, 17 notebooks with details of the borrowers, six plastic containers of red paint and three samurai swords,” he said in a statement, today.Annuar Amri said investigations found that the syndicate had been offering the unlicensed loans in Kedah, Perak, Penang and Perlis over the last two years, targeting government employees, private sector employees, small traders, retailers and factory workers.He said the syndicate advertised their services through social media sites such as Facebook and the WeChat application as well as through banners and brochures.He added that the syndicate also imposed conditions that must be met before the loan is given and imposed a 10-to-15 per cent interest depending on the loan, and offered a weekly or monthly repayment.“Usually the loans are between RM1,000 to RM50,000 and if the borrower failed to settle the payment within the stipulated period, the syndicate would resort to violence such as threatening notes, using abusive words and splashing paint,” he said.He added that all the suspects had no previous criminal records and would be remanded for four days from today under Section 5 (2), Section 29 (A) (1), Section 29B of the Unlicensed Moneylenders Act 1951.Under Section 5 (2), those convicted can be fined up to RM250,000 and not more than RM1 million or a jail term of up to five years or both.Section 29 A (1) provides for a fine of up to RM20,000 or imprisonment for two years or both, while Section 29B of the Act provides for a maximum fine of RM250,000 or a jail sentence of not more than three years or both. — Bernama [...]
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Woman finds dead baby girl among trash at Sabah apartment
KOTA KINABALU: A woman was cleaning out rubbish bins at the Cyber City Apartment II near here when she noticed a plastic bag, thinking that it contained chicken. Without much thought, the cleaner took the bag from among the trash, and felt that it was a bit too heavy. She put it on the ground and checked it properly, only to find a dead baby girl with its umbilical cord still attached. Penampang police chief Deputy Supt Haris Ibrahim said the woman alerted police of her 10.20am find on Sunday (July 28). "Medical officials found that the baby was already lifeless," he said. DSP Haris said the body was taken to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital for a post-mortem. "Anyone with information about this case can contact us and assist with investigations," he said. [...]
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Liverpool team news: Predicted 4-3-3 line up vs Sporting Lisbon – Four among injury doubts
LIVERPOOL will be without a handful of players against Sporting Lisbon due to injury as the Reds desperately search for some sort of form in the final match of their pre-season tour. [...]
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GSK, Vodafone among companies fighting EU tax clawback order
LUXEMBOURG/LONDON (July 15): GlaxoSmithKline Plc, Vodafone Group Plc and BT Group Plc are among more than a dozen companies that have challenged a European Union... [...]
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Mainlanders among Hong Kong protesters, though many stay away
Inside Hong Kong, mainland Chinese are afforded the same free speech protections as any other inhabitant, but they risk censure or punishment on return to the mainland. AFP Photo As Hong Kong is rocked by political chaos, Chinese mainlander Briony Lin has found herself joining the mass protests, an act that would be unthinkable under the authoritarian regime back home. The huge rallies and clashes coursing through the international finance hub are the latest outburst of anger by Hong Kongers who believe Beijing is stamping down on the city’s unique freedoms and culture. But for the hundreds of thousands of Chinese mainlanders who make the city their home, the movement sparks mixed emotions. Some strongly disagree with the protests, which were set off by a now-suspended plan to allow extraditions to the Chinese mainland. Many have sympathies with the movement, but keep it to themselves — fearful of retribution by Chinese authorities, or being made to feel unwelcome by local protesters. A small number of people, like Lin, have taken to the streets. “This is the first social movement that I’ve experienced,” said the 27-year-old, who moved to Hong Kong four years ago from a city in northern China. “Hong Kong is the only place in China where freedom of speech can be exercised… I want to be there for my own rights and be there to see for myself what the protests are like,” she told AFP. Lin said she was happy to give her name and, unlike many, eschewed wearing a mask at the rallies — although she has stayed clear of the more violent confrontations. – Mainland influx – Some one million mainlanders have migrated to Hong Kong since its 1997 handover to China, a diaspora that is itself a source of friction in a city of 7.3 million beset by sky-high property prices and a huge housing shortage. Inside Hong Kong they are afforded the same free speech protections as any other inhabitant, but they risk censure or punishment on return to the mainland should authorities deem them to be critical of Beijing. Lin said she was indifferent to politics before she moved to the city. But the disappearance of five Hong Kong booksellers into Chinese mainland custody — and discovering more about the Cultural Revolution on its 50th anniversary — changed that. “If the (extradition) bill is passed, the disappearance of booksellers would happen again within the law,” she said. Not all share Lin’s bravado. In China the protests have been portrayed as a violent, foreign-funded plot, not a mass movement against Beijing’s increased influence over the semi-autonomous hub. AFP approached some 20 mainland tourists in Kowloon to ask them their thoughts and only six had heard there were rallies. “It is rare to see protests on the mainland,” said a 21-year-old student surnamed Zhu who said she had read about the protests on the Twitter-like Weibo platform. Another tourist, who gave her surname as Hao, said she had read in Chinese state media that Britain “participated in and provoked this incident”. “I don’t know whether it is correct or not,” she added. Mainlanders who live in Hong Kong cannot profess such ignorance, but many “Hong Kong drifters” — the phrase adopted by young, educated mainlanders who live and work in the finance hub — are still very cautious about expressing political views. “Protesting is quite sensitive for us… I don’t want to bear any risks,” said Liu, 30, who works in insurance and came to Hong Kong seven years ago. He said many of his mainland contemporaries hoped the protests would die down soon. Kay Zeng, 28, from Guangdong province, just across the border with Hong Kong, said she disapproved of the extradition bill being rushed through, but would not take to the streets. “I’ve never participated in a march and I seldom publicly express my opinions,” she told AFP. In China, the Hong Kong protests have been portrayed as a violent, foreign-funded plot, not a mass movement against Beijing’s increased influence. AFP Photo – ‘Right thing to do’ – But small numbers are adopting the pro-democracy cause. A group of mainland Chinese migrants openly participated in recent rallies, holding banners and shouting slogans in their own dialects, not the city’s Cantonese language. Minnie Li, a university lecturer who came from Shanghai to Hong Kong in 2008, helped organise the group. She said mainland migrants have always attended pro-democracy rallies, but most of the time they kept themselves hidden in the crowd. Li said it took years for her to pluck up the courage to attend — something she felt more able to do once she acquired a permanent residency card. “I believe visibility is a power. If you have a secret stance but dare not to tell others about it then you can’t transform that into a power. So I hope to show our power through our presence,” she told AFP. Some of the more hardline Hong Kong protesters take an openly hostile view towards mainlanders, calling them “locusts” and other insults. That animosity used to make Li hesitate, but not any more. “Your emotions, your action and your values aren’t based on where you were born, or your ethnic group,” she said. “You do something because you think it is the right thing to do.” – AFP Facebook Messenger Twitter WhatsApp Email Print The post Mainlanders among Hong Kong protesters, though many stay away appeared first on Borneo Post Online. [...]
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Goldsmith among eight nabbed over spate of burglaries in Melaka, Negri Sembilan
MELAKA (Bernama): A goldsmith, who acted as the leader of a burglary gang suspected of being behind 30 home break-in cases involving losses amounting to RM900,000 in Melaka and Negeri Sembilan, was among eight men arrested in an operation involving separate raids here over the past few days. [...]
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Father and teenage son among 14 drug addicts nabbed at Penang mosque
Che Zaimani said the teenager and his father were picked up while asking for donations at the mosque. — AFP pic GEORGE TOWN, July 11 — A 13-year-old boy and his father were among 14 drug addicts arrested in an operation dubbed Ops Tapis Khas carried out around Jalan Masjid Kapitan Keling here yesterday.Northeast District Police chief ACP Che Zaimani Che Awang said the teenager, who is a school drop-out, and his father, in his 40s, were picked up while asking for donations at the mosque, which is one of the tourist attractions in Penang.“The operation was held following public complaints of the presence of drug addicts asking for donations in the area. As a result, a total of 14 of such individuals, aged between 13 and 56, were arrested,” he told Bernama when contacted here today.He said one of the individuals was believed to be a drug pusher as some heroin and syabu were found in his possession during the operation.“Police will continue carrying out anti-drug operations from time to time to ensure that the areas in Jalan Masjid Kapitan Keling are free of unhealthy activities that will tarnish its image as a tourist attraction,” he added. — Bernama [...]
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One-week coding camps costing at least S$1,760 a hit among Singapore parents
Zhu Liliang, who is the chief technology officer of ZhongAn International, has sent his daughter Apple to two coding camps. — TODAY pic SINGAPORE, July 6 — At age six, while most of her peers were still getting acquainted with times tables, Apple Zhu received her dad’s old MacBook so that she can get a headstart in programming.On it, she learnt how to use block-based visual programming language Scratch to perform 10 actions with just one press of a button, as well as Java to build maps on three-dimensional computer game Minecraft.Then she got extra help: Coding bootcamps.She attended one that cost more than S$600 (RM1,800) last year.Last week, the 10-year-old United World College of South East Asia pupil took part in another bootcamp that cost US$1,399 (S$1,900), where she learnt to use a programme called RPG Maker to build her own game using Java code.“Coding is fun. After a while, it gets harder and harder, but still in the end, you know that you made a game, so it is cool,” Apple said.As demand for tech talent heats up, some parents are not taking chances with their children’s coding development — like Apple’s father, Zhu Liliang, who is the chief technology officer of ZhongAn International, a subsidiary of Chinese insurtech giant ZhongAn.This school break, the 43-year-old Singapore permanent resident from China asked his wife to pick any enrichment course she deemed worthy.She chose to pay a premium on a game design camp offered by iD Tech, a firm headquartered in Silicon Valley.Parents flew kids from Singapore to US for campsDespite enrolment costs of between S$1,760 and S$2,400, parents eagerly sign up for its week-long programmes, which are touted to “develop the in-demand skills needed to compete at top companies like Razer, Google, Facebook and Microsoft”. All four companies have offices in Singapore.In its inaugural year in Singapore last year, about 280 children and teenagers aged seven to 17 attended the camps held on the National University of Singapore campus.This year, its programmes drew some 390 participants.iD Tech’s director of international operations Kristopher Kasper told TODAY his firm expanded to Singapore because of the demand — it had noticed that a number of parents fly their kids from Singapore to the United States to attend its camps.“Singapore is a country that is interested in education, in technology. It is a place that prioritises education,” the American said.In the United States, iD Tech — which has been around for 20 years — is known for its by-selection-only three-week tech bootcamps at Stanford University.Called AcademyNext, the bootcamps link teens aged 16 to 19 directly with “top recruiters” from Google and other tech giants.Coding ‘should be fun and rewarding’Zhu told TODAY that the iD Tech camp is part of his efforts to instil “programming thinking” in his daughter.“For me, (the type of programming) language is just one thing,” he said. “Once you understand one language, it is quite easy to (learn another). They have some design thinking in this language. The basic things are quite similar.”At the iD Tech camp, Apple built a game that is reminiscent of the early incarnation of the Nintendo Game Boy Pokemon game.She created a protagonist named Max who is on a quest to find a hidden dragon before it bombs the city in 15 minutes.Zhu said he was not surprised that Apple can programme such a game, as she had been exposed to programming thinking when she started fiddling with iPads at age three.In fact, he is already thinking ahead: He wants Apple to learn Swift code to programme things like facial recognition.However, Zhu said it is important not to pile on too much stress on the child in picking up coding.“Put them on a path, but (programming) does not have to be tough,” he said. “Your child will have to deal with it their whole life, and they shouldn’t resist these things. It should be fun and rewarding.” — TODAY [...]
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Arsenal among four clubs courting Chelsea hero as Unai Emery plots first summer signing
ARSENAL are considering making a move for former Chelsea hero Gary Cahill this summer. [...]
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Avocado Kopi bubble tea, salted egg tamagoyaki among fusion treats at Singapore Food Festival
The Singapore Food Festival runs from July 12 to 28. — Handout via TODAY SINGAPORE, June 28 — This year, if you want to get a bite of the Singapore Food Festival, you will not have to shell out top dollar for fancy ModSin fare or a ticket to a foodie workshop — you just have to walk to the nearest 7-Eleven, Ya Kun or LiHo outlet.For the 26th edition of the festival, which will run from July 12 to 28, bubble tea chain LiHo has created an “avocado kopi” drink, which is a blend of avocado and coffee, that will be available at selected LiHO outlets from July 12 to September 30.Homegrown Ya Kun, meanwhile, has teamed up with Japan’s Glico to produce two new Pocky flavours: Kopi-o and kaya toast, which will be sold at the upcoming Streat food fair and Ya Kun outlets islandwide from July 12 onwards, while stocks last.Local and Japanese chefs will also be teaming up on two fronts.The first will see them rolling out a line of convenience store fusion food items at 7-Eleven stores across Singapore between July 10 and August 6.These are ready-to-eat chicken satay onigiri (rice balls with chicken satay), salted egg tamagoyaki (Japanese rolled omelette with salted egg yolk sauce) and takoyaki (ball-shaped Japanese snacks of fluffy dough) with chilli crab sauce and egg mayo, priced between S$2 and S$2.80 (RM6.10 to RM8.60).Foodies with more cash to spare, meanwhile, can tuck into the collaboration between Japanese ramen chain Ippudo and local seafood restaurant No Signboard Seafood — the two will be offering an Ultimate Chilli Crab Ramen for S$33 a bowl throughout July, at Ippudo Mandarin Gallery and Marina Bay Sands. However, only 30 bowls will be served daily at each store.Budget-conscious foodies such as undergraduate Nathis Wee, 25, who has never participated in Singapore Food Festival events before, said the 7-Eleven fusion snacks were a good way for young people like him to join in the festivities without breaking the bank, adding that he would not pay as much as S$33 for a bowl of ramen.“I would only spend that much if the ingredients are premium, like if there’s uni, lobster or kurobuta pork inside, and provided the bowl is big enough to share among two people, otherwise it’s not really worth it,” he said.Fellow undergraduate, How Ying Hui, 22, who similarly has never attended Singapore Food Festival events, said that the fusion treats on offer this year “look really good” and as they are affordable too, she will likely try them.“Since it is all about the bubble tea craze now, it will be interesting to try LiHo’s avocado kopi at the festival. Like all Singaporeans, I too like to try new things, especially since it is only here for a limited period of time,” she said.Singapore Tourism Board’s Director of Retail and Dining, Ranita Sundramoorthy, said the move to include popular snacks such as bubble tea and Pocky in this year’s festival was made to keep the festival’s offerings “fresh and relevant”.Ranita said that the organisers always receive a lot of creative ideas for the festival each year, whenever they launch a call for suggestions.That is a “clear indication that people are interested to do a lot more with food”, she said.“So increasingly, you now find people who are not just doing food, but they are doing food and dance, food and art, food and photography, food and movies. And these are the kinds of new events that we want to introduce to the locals as well as tourists,” she said.As with past editions of the Singapore Food Festival, this year will also feature events such as Streat, a food fair where 12 restaurateurs will sell their modern interpretations of local hawker food.The festival will also feature workshops for foodies who want to try their hand at making tea, kuehs and special dishes and menus at a range of restaurants.In a nod to the growing vegetarian and vegan community here, there will also be a Singapore Vegan Food Crawl, as well as a Singapore Tea Festival and Private Chef’s Table, a private dining experience and food from Singapore’s best home chefs, alongside other events. — TODAY [...]
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'Drug parties' busted, four teenagers among 10 arrested
BUKIT MERTAJAM (Bernama): Two "drug parties" were busted on Monday (June 24) when the Seberang Perai Tengah police raided two separate premises and detained 19 individuals, four of whom were minors. [...]
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Orang Asli Development Dept: Mass deaths among Orang Asli community unprecedented
A general view of the deserted Kampung Sungai Berua near Hulu Terengganu June 19, 2019. — Bernama pic KOTA BHARU, June 23 — The Orang Asli Development Department (JAKOA) has described the sudden mass deaths among the Orang Asli community from the Batek tribe in Kuala Koh, Gua Musang, as an unprecedented occurrence.Kelantan/Terengganu JAKOA director, Hashim Alang Abdul Hamid said it could be regarded as a dark moment in the history of the community.He said the process of burying the bodies of the 15 people who died due to a measles outbreak took almost an hour, and it would always be remembered by the Orang Asli.“We hope this kind of tragedy will not occur again, and we have advised those from the community who have symptoms of the disease to immediately seek treatment at the hospital.“After this incident, we also find that there is greater awareness among the Orang Asli community about diseases, especially infectious ones such as measles,” he said when contacted today.Meanwhile, he said about 50 residents including the families of the deceased attended the burial today.According to him, a meeting with the Orang Asli people from Kuala Koh who were currently living in temporary shelters at the Taman Etnobotani camp in Gua Musang found that they were now more aware of hygiene and the causes of diseases.He said there was a positive response from all of them, and JAKOA planned to have a village cleanup programme with the community once it was declared safe. — Bernama [...]
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Bendang Studio produces beautiful ceramic tableware that’s a hit among restaurateurs
In 2008, Rozana Musa set up a small studio in her mum’s kitchen in Melaka. The art and design graduate from UiTM then started collecting clay from a small river nearby to create her own sculptures and accessories. “When I first started, I joined a few baazars in KL and sold items like hand-painted brooches accessories,” she says. In 2010, she moved across the road to her grandmother’s empty sundry shop and officially started Bendang Studio, specialising in tableware like plates, cups and bowls. Rozana’s tableware is hand-crafted from start to finish, with designs that are whimsical with a distinctly modern ethos. You might get a black plate speckled with blue polka dots or a white plate with what looks like rugged, artistic swipes of pink paint. Either way, each piece is unique and all are unquestionably beautiful. Rozana’s hand-crafted tableware has become hugely popular, especially in KL. Photo: Bendang Artisan Which is why word of her work soon spread and restaurants began clamouring for her pieces. These days, Rozana’s custom pieces can be seen against the backdrop of meals at eateries as far-ranging as Beta KL, De.Wan by Chef Wan, Roost KL, Jibby & Co, Bean Brothers, Puntry by Pun’s Ice Cream, Blackbyrd and Atas at the new The RuMa Hotel and Residences. Tan San Eu, better known as Euwie, is the founder of Puntry by Pun’s Ice Cream and is one of the restaurateurs who is an ardent fan of Rozana’s work. “I discovered Bendang on a friend’s blog and instantly loved what they did. A lot of our plates are custom-made based on Rozana’s designs because we wanted to highlight her sense of creativity,” says Euwie, adding that he plans to order more plates from Bendang when Pun’s expands. Spreading their wings Having captured the attention of numerous restaurant owners, Rozana realised that she simply couldn’t cope by herself anymore, which is why last year, she roped in long-time fan Imaya Wong as her partner. Rozana (left) partnered with Wong last year after realising she couldn’t cope with the demand for her products alone. The Star/Sam Tham “A few years back, I attended an event where Rozana was selling her work and I fell in love with it. So I started buying and collecting her stuff and the passion just grew from there. And my background is in design and branding and hers is ceramic-making, so we thought we could just combine our skills,” says Wong. Rozana concurs and adds, “I knew Bendang needed to expand but I couldn’t keep thinking of everything alone so that’s why I decided to partner with Imaya.” The partnership has also ensured that Rozana is able to grow her brand more organically to keep up with the growing demand for her products, especially in KL. Which is why in March this year, under the new partnership, Rozana and Wong established Bendang Artisan in Linc KL, their first ever retail outlet. “Prior to this, we opened a pop-up shop at Zhongshan building, and got really good response, because to many people, it was our first retail presence. From that response, we knew we needed a more permanent space, so we decided to open here when we were offered a lot,” says Wong. For Rozana though, this is the culmination of a long-nurtured dream to leave a footprint in KL. “Most of our customers are from KL, so a few years ago, I started planning because I knew that I needed to open a shop in KL,” says Rozana, laughing. The design process. Rozana typically comes up with five to six different designs every year, hinged around festive seasons like Hari Raya, Chinese New Year, Deepavali, Merdeka and Christmas. Each design requires research and experimentation to get the colours and overall effects just right. Rozana estimates that she has already tested thousands of colours to date! The production is totally done in Rozana’s studio in Melaka, where she has hired a team of five to help her. Because she now does mass orders for restaurants as well as pieces for her retail outlet, she no longer uses the clay from the river nearby, as it is not so durable. Instead, she gets clay from a local supplier. A batch of plates can take Rozana and her team days to produce as they do everything from scratch. To make the plates, Rozana first has to form them, before they are left to dry and then popped in the kiln (oven) to be baked for six-and-a-half hours to attain a temperature of 806°C. After this, the colouring and glazing are done, and the tableware is once again returned to the kiln until it attains a temperature of 1195°C, which can take 10 hours. Following this, Rozana and her team switch off the kiln but cannot open it as they have to wait for the temperature to drop to somewhere between 200°C to 300°C, before they can take the plates out. “The whole process is very tedious and technical to make, because clay is so sensitive,” agrees Wong. Because each piece is handmade, Rozana says the reject percentage (damaged plates) is also much higher. “Sometimes the percentage can be 50%, sometimes if we’re lucky, it can be only 10%. There are always unexpected things that happen, sometimes we get unintentional effects, sometimes the colour changes from what we intended and then we have to repeat it again, so it’s a very long process,” she says. Ultimately though, both Rozana and Wong say they have discovered that there is huge demand for what they do, as more and more people are appreciative of local products. “Yeah, actually, the demand is really high and there is a lot of potential in this business as I think the awareness for local artisanal products is much higher now,” says Rozana. Moving forward, the partners say their long-term aim is a lofty one, but they are determined to press ahead with the idea of establishing a Malaysian ceramic archive pilot project. “The goal is to build and sustain the project as part of Bendang’s vision in ar [...]
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The Edge's breakdown of 1MDB funds among 41 recipients not quite accurate, says MACC source
General view of the MACC headquarters in Putrajaya June 21, 2019. — Picture by Choo Choy May KUALA LUMPUR, June 21 — Financial daily The Edge's list of the purported breakdown of the portion of RM270 million funds from 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) to 41 alleged recipients via Datuk Seri Najib Razak's account is "not quite accurate", a source has said.When contacted for clarification, the source from the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) told Malay Mail that the list published by The Edge was not an official list from the anti-graft body."This is not from us, and it's not quite accurate," the source said.The source acknowledged that the list was not entirely wrong, but confirmed that some of the figures cited were inaccurate.Earlier today, MACC said it has filed a forfeiture lawsuit under anti-money laundering laws to recover RM270 million that were dispersed or misused from 1MDB to 41 individuals or entities.Malay Mail understands that the MACC would not be disclosing the full details of the forfeiture action — including the alleged amount received by each of the 41 respondents — at this point in time as the respondents have to be served the court papers and be given a chance to respond. [...]
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Malaysia among countries eyed by Apple to move production capacity
TOKYO: Apple Inc has asked its major suppliers to assess the cost implications of moving 15%-30% of their production capacity from China to Southeast Asia as it prepares for a restructuring of its supply chain, according to a Nikkei Asian Review report on Wednesday. [...]
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