Saudi

Indy Football Podcast: Chelsea vs Man United, Saudi takeover talk, Champions League review plus Liverpool vs Bayern preview
PODCAST: Ed Malyon is joined by Miguel Delaney and Jack Pitt-Brooke for this week's episode [...]
Save
Saudi Arabia denies crown prince seeks to buy Manchester United
DUBAI (Reuters) - Saudi Arabia's crown prince is not seeking to buy Premier League football club Manchester United, the kingdom's media minister said on Monday, denying reports and adding that there had only been a meeting with the Saudi wealth fund regarding sponsorship. [...]
Save
Man Utd news: Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's position over reported £3.8 billion takeover bid clarified
The Red Devils are valued at £3.1 billion with talks held with the sovreign wealth fund over a potential sponsorship deal [...]
Save
Tun M on condemning Saudi Crown Prince: We’ll see what Japan and China say
When asked if the Prime Minister will condemn the Saudi Crown Prince in person on the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi,Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said “we’ll see what Japan and China said first.” Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is scheduled to visit Malaysia from Feb 17-18. This will be his first tour to South-East Asia since he was implicated in the murder of Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist, at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October 2018. Dr Mahathir had previously condemned the killing, describing it as an act of “extreme cruelty”. [...]
Save
Saudi Crown Prince postpones visit to Malaysia
KUALA LUMPUR (Feb 16): The Malaysian Government has been informed of the postponement of Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s visit to Malaysia which... [...]
Save
Pakistan, India hope to reap investment from Saudi prince's visit
NEW DELHI/ISLAMABAD (Feb 12): Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is expected to announce investments in energy and infrastructure during a visit to India... [...]
Save
US pressed on Khashoggi amid report Saudi prince threatened ‘bullet’
File photo shows protesters gather in front of the Saudi Arabian Embassy as they call for justice in the killing of Khashoggi, in Washington, DC. — AFP photo WASHINGTON: US lawmakers threatened Thursday to take tougher action against Saudi Arabia over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi amid a new revelation that the kingdom’s powerful crown prince spoke of going after him with a ‘bullet’. President Donald Trump faced a Friday deadline set by Congress to determine if Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the assassination of Khashoggi, who was strangled and dismembered after entering the kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul on Oct 2. Special United Nations (UN) rapporteur, Agnes Callamard, said Thursday after a visit to Turkey that the killing of Khashoggi, who had written critical pieces on Saudi Arabia in The Washington Post, had been ‘planned and perpetrated’ by Saudi officials. The New York Times, citing officials who had seen US intelligence, said that Prince Mohammed had warned in an intercepted conversation to an aide in 2017 that he would go after Khashoggi ‘with a bullet’ if he did not return to Saudi Arabia from the US. US intelligence understood that the ambitious 33-year-old heir apparent was ready to kill the journalist, although he may not have literally meant to shoot him, according to the newspaper. The kingdom, after initially denying any knowledge of Khashoggi’s disappearance, has acknowledged that a team killed him inside the embassy but described it as a rogue operation that did not involve the crown prince. In October, the then top Republican and Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee invoked a law that gave the Trump administration 120 days — until Feb 8 — to determine whether Prince Mohammed ordered Khashoggi’s murder and to outline actions against him. Predicting little movement, a bipartisan group of senators on Thursday proposed a bill to cut off some weapons sales to Saudi Arabia including of tanks, long-range fighter jets and ordnance for automatic weapons. The bill would also require sanctions against any Saudis involved in Khashoggi’s killing and require State Department reports on human rights in the kingdom and in the conduct of its war in Yemen. “Seeing as the Trump administration has no intention of insisting on full accountability for Mr Khashoggi’s murderers, it is time for Congress to step in and impose real consequences to fundamentally re-examine our relationship with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and with the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen,” said Robert Menendez, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The bill enjoys support from top Republicans including Senator Lindsey Graham, usually a close ally of Trump. “While Saudi Arabia is a strategic ally, the behavior of the crown prince – in multiple ways – has shown disrespect for the relationship and made him, in my view, beyond toxic,” Graham said. The Senate already voted in December to end support for the bloody Saudi-led offensive on rebels in Yemen, where millions are on the brink of starvation in what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. The move is likely to pass the new Democratic-led House of Representatives after a hearing on legislation Wednesday, although Trump could exercise his veto. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo raised Khashoggi’s killing among other issues during a meeting Thursday with Adel al-Jubeir, the Saudi minister of state for foreign affairs, according to the State Department. — AFP But Trump has publicly said that he is not concerned whether Crown Prince Mohammed was involved in Khashoggi’s killing, saying the Saudi alliance benefits Washington due to the kingdom’s major purchases of weapons and its hostility to regional rival Iran. Asked about yesterday’s deadline, State Department spokesman Robert Palladino said that the US had already taken action over Khashoggi’s killing, pointing to last year’s revocation of visas for nearly two dozen Saudi officials and the freezing of assets of 17 others. “We will continue to consult with the Congress and work to hold accountable those who are responsible for Jamal Khashoggi’s killing,” Palladino told reporters, declining to say if more action would be forthcoming. In a joint statement accompanied by a rally outside the White House, six advocacy groups including Human Rights Watch, Reporters Without Borders and the Committee to Protect Journalists urged Trump to release CIA records on Khashoggi’s death, support an independent investigation and press the Saudis to free detained reporters and activists. “Notwithstanding public and congressional outrage and the reported findings of the CIA, the Trump administration appears to be engaged in a cover-up on behalf of the Saudi government,” they wrote. — AFP [...]
Save
British lawmakers say highest Saudi authorities may be responsible for activists' torture
LONDON (Feb 4): Three British lawmakers on Monday endorsed reports that women activists detained in Saudi Arabia have been tortured, and said responsibility for what... [...]
Save
Saudi Arabia to set up US$10b oil refinery in Pakistan
GWADAR, Pakistan: Saudi Arabia plans to set up a US$10 billion oil refinery in Pakistan's deepwater port of Gwadar, the Saudi energy minister said on Saturday, speaking at the Indian Ocean port that is being developed with the help of China. [...]
Save
Saudi teen who tweeted plight is granted asylum, arrives in Canada     – CNET
Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun lands in the country after fleeing her family and pleading for help on social media. [...]
Save
OPEC output falls most in 2 years as Saudi cuts begin
By BLOOMBERG LONDON • Before its agreement to cut oil supplies even started, OPEC’s production plunged by the most in almost two years last month. In a sign of the urgency felt by the cartel amid tumbling crude prices, leading member Saudi Arabia throttled back production, according to a Bloomberg survey of officials, analysts and ship-tracking data. The group’s pact to curb output only formally started this week. The kingdom’s deliberate cutbacks were compounded by unplanned losses in Iran, which is being targeted by US sanctions, and in Libya, where protests halted the biggest oil field. As a result, oil output from OPEC fell 530,000 barrels a day to 32.6 million a day last month. It’s the sharpest pullback since January 2017, when the group first embarked on its strategy to clear the glut created by rising supplies of US shale oil. A global coalition of oil producers known as OPEC+, which comprises both members of the group and other exporters including Russia, agreed on Dec 7 to reduce output during the first six months of 2019. Crude prices failed to rally however, and instead slumped to the lowest in more than a year. Brent crude futures climbed as much as 5.1% on Wednesday as shipping data showed Saudi Arabia was delivering its announced cutbacks. It traded at US$55.74 (RM230.76) a barrel at 5:52pm in London yesterday. That’s about 35% below the four-year peak reached in early October. Investors remain concerned that OPEC+ isn’t cutting enough to make way for another surge of supply anticipated from shale oil drillers in America. They’re also increasingly worried that a slowing global economy, coupled with the US-China trade dispute, will hit fuel demand and swell the pile-up of unwanted crude. “Slowdown fears” are “putting more pressure on OPEC to stabilise the petroleum markets”, said Phil Flynn, a markets analyst at Price Futures Group Inc. “So, let the cuts begin.” The Saudis curtailed production by 420,000 barrels a day to 10.65 million last month, from a record of just above 11 million reached in November, the survey showed. Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih has promised to cut even deeper this month, going beyond the reductions the kingdom signed up to. Even with the pre-emptive Saudi cutbacks, OPEC has plenty of work still to do to fulfil its promises. The 11 members bound by the deal committed to an overall cut of 800,000 barrels a day, mostly from their October levels, while their non-OPEC partners pledged a decrease of 400,000 barrels a day. Production from those 11 countries is now 140,000 barrels a day below their October level, so they would need to cut about another 660,000 barrels a day to implement the agreement. Countries which last month rushed to maximise oil exports before the agreement took effect will now need to reverse those increases. Iraq, which bridled at the requirement to cut shipments last year, bolstered output by 130,000 barrels a day in December to 4.7 million a day, according to the survey. The United Arab Emirates, which has been expanding production capacity, also increased output. The post OPEC output falls most in 2 years as Saudi cuts begin appeared first on The Malaysian Reserve. [...]
Save
U.N. rights office says Saudi trial in Khashoggi case “not sufficient”
GENEVA – The United Nations human rights office said on Friday it could not assess the fairness of a trial taking place in Saudi Arabia related to the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, but that in any case it was “not sufficient”. Spokeswoman Ravina Shamdasani, asked about reports that a Saudi prosecutor had sought the death sentence for five suspects linked to the Oct. 2 killing, reiterated the office’s call for an independent investigation “with international involvement” . The U.N. rights office always opposed the death penalty, she added. (Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; editing by John Stonestreet) –REUTERS / BLOOMBERG Photo The post U.N. rights office says Saudi trial in Khashoggi case “not sufficient” appeared first on The Malaysian Reserve. [...]
Save
Saudi Arabia holds first court session for Khashoggi murder
BEIRUT/DUBAI (Jan 3): Saudi Arabia held its first trial session for the murder of government critic Jamal Khashoggi, whose killing at the kingdom’s consulate in... [...]
Save
MMHE and Technip to offer services to Saudi Aramco
Malaysia Marine and Heavy Engineering Holdings Bhd’s (MHB) subsidiary, Malaysia Marine and Heavy Engineering Sdn Bhd (MMHE) and consortium partner TechnipFMC, have inked a six-years long-term agreement (LTA) with Saudi Arabia state’s oil company Saudi Aramco to offer engineering, procurement, fabrication, transportation, and installation of offshore facilities in support Aramco’s offshore maintain potential programme and other works in Saudi Arabia. In an exchange filling today, MHB noted the agreement comes with an option to extend for another six years. MHB’s MD and CEO Wan Mashitah Wan Abdullah Sani (picture) said the group’s entry into Saudi Arabia marks a significant milestone for its heavy engineering segment as it pursue growth in line for its portfolio expansion in the international market. Meanwhile, MHB added it has secured a contract for fabrication of the pluto water handling module from TechnipFMC. The module, targeted for completion in the fourth quarter of 2020, will be installed on Woodside Energy Ltd’s existing Pluto Alpha Gas Production Platform, located offshore Western Australia. – TMR var VUUKLE_EMOTE_SIZE = "90px"; VUUKLE_EMOTE_IFRAME = "180px" var EMOTE_TEXT = ["HAPPY","INDIFFERENT","AMUSED","EXCITED","ANGRY","SAD"]The post MMHE and Technip to offer services to Saudi Aramco appeared first on The Malaysian Reserve. [...]
Save
The Saudis just can't seem to become the Saudi Arabia of solar
DUBAI (Dec 20): Around the world, high oil prices tend to accelerate the shift to renewable energy and electric vehicles. In Saudi Arabia, they have... [...]
Save
Uber stuck between a rock and a hard place with Saudi investment     – CNET
CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says his company isn't changing anything in terms of its relationship with Saudi Arabia until more is known about the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. [...]
Save