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PSG vs Manchester United: Ole Gunnar Solskjaer plotting to 'stay in the game' to save Champions League tie
United need to score twice in order to progress. At the very same time, it would not be wise to let go of the reins against a Paris Saint-Germain side that could easily pick them off [...]
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A stitch in time: Fashion's new stars want to save the world
Models present creations by Marine Serre during the Fall-Winter 2019/2020 Ready-to-Wear collection fashion show in Issy-les-Moulineaux, on the outskirts of Paris February 26, 2019. — AFP pic PARIS, March 4 — A new generation of rising fashion stars alarmed by the plight of the planet are designing in a radically different way to their elders.Some of the most interesting shows of Paris fashion week — once notorious for its decadence and waste — have come from millennials and Generation Z creators rejecting the over-consumption they were brought up with.Marine Serre, whose last catwalk show featured evening dresses made from old bedspreads, warned this time of “the war on the climate destroying civilisation as we know it” with a collection created from upcycled and repurposed materials.The 27-year-old's brand is one of the fastest growing in France, with her sporty but fiercely feminine clothes and accessories snapped up as soon as they are made.Sales have rocketed five-fold in a year.For Serre, who won the top LVMH prize in 2017, there is no choice but to change. “It is an enormous challenge to develop sustainably.“But the apocalypse can be positive if we use it to stimulate creation, using shells” or things that are already there “and cost nothing,” she told AFP.Glamorous futuristBerlin-based Ottolinger share a similar ethos and aesthetic.They recut existing clothes or surplus stock for their glamorous futurist evening and streetwear.“There is so much overproduction and consumption, we cannot justify it any longer," said Cosima Gadient backstage after the duo's Paris show was cheered by critics.“There is so much out there already in fashion, so much has already been done,” said her partner Christa Bosch.“To do something new we would take a garment apart and recut it, or put it back together in our way," she Bosch, who met Gadient in fashion school in Switzerland.“We have been doing this since we were kids. You maybe have a favourite T-shirt or jacket and it is not working anymore, so you take it apart and you try to make something new.”Mix of tech“You might discover amazing things, the lining and stitching that can give you ideas — you can do so many things,” she told AFP.“You already have character, the ghost of the garment, and it can be built up into something rich.”Fellow Swiss designer Eliane Heutsch is following a similar line using tech and highly researched couture and revived ancestral techniques to reimagine existing clothing for her Savoar Fer label.Established brands too are rejecting the throwaway clothes culture. Stella McCartney has built her fashion empire on ethical thinking and increasing use of recycled fabrics.But fellow British designer Vivienne Westwood wants to go further, urging people to stop buying conventionally produced clothes altogether to shock both consumers and the industry into change.Her Austrian-born husband Andreas Krontaller, who now designs their Paris shows, thinks fashion needs a reality check.'Use up what we've got'“I like making enormous collections but I don't think it fits our times. We don't need all this stuff.“I think twice now about buying another navy sweater and I think twice too about making things. I only make a piece if I really like it or it is going to be very interesting or new,” he told AFP.“What is truly sustainable is to repurpose what already exists, materials that are lying dormant or by-products that would normally be thrown away,” he said.Kronthaler said he mostly works from surplus high-quality fabrics gathering dust in the vast warehouses that supply the industry.“Recycled materials will soon be our normal but I am for using up what we have got first,” he said.Putting the planet first is a given for this new generation of designers showing in Paris.For that to happen consumers and creators need to rekindle their emotional connection with clothes, said Emma Hedlund and Saif Bakir, the Swedish couple behind CMMN SWDN, which in the running for this year's International Woolmark Prize.That means learning to find "beauty and charm" in the worn and torn, the couple told AFP.“Since we don't make with our hands anymore, clothes have lost their value and are easily replaced,” Hedlund said.“But we all have a favourite jacket, or a T-shirt or pair of jeans that we wish we could wear forever.“We should take it a bit slower and consider what we are wearing and take care of your garments,” she said. “Wear it, tear it and mend it and rewear it again.” — AFP [...]
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Stars turn out for Stella McCartney’s bid to save rainforest
A model presents a creation by Stella McCartney during the Fall-Winter 2019/2020 Ready-to-Wear collection fashion show in Paris, on March 4, 2019. — AFP pic PARIS, March 4 — Stella McCartney showed what can be done with upcycled clothes and fabrics in a classy Paris show whose front row was filled with celebrity fans led by Oprah Winfrey.The British designer — a vegan who used the show to launch a #ThereSheGrows Instagram campaign to save the Sumatran rainforest — edged her big belted opening space samurai coat with her shiny “vegetarian leather”, a trick she repeated with some style throughout the collection. Russian model Natalia Vodianova presents a creation by Stella McCartney during the Fall-Winter 2019/2020 Ready-to-Wear collection fashion show in Paris, on March 4, 2019. — AFP pic Russian supermodel and philanthrophist Natalia Vodianova — now a mother of five — had an “SOS” Earth tattoo inked on her famously high cheekbones with other models carrying similar slogans such as “Green is the new black”.McCartney has already recruited Hollywood stars Gwyneth Paltrow, Drew Barrymore and Rooney Mara as well as singer Pink into the #ThereSheGrows campaign, which involves dedicating a tree to someone special with a heartfelt message.The show, in the gilded Belle Epoque splendour of the Opera Garnier in the centre of the French capital, began with a voiceover of people dedicating trees to their loved ones.Winfrey said she felt inspired to plant an oak in honour of her mother, Vernita Lee, who died aged 83 in November.“I already have hundreds in my yard,” she added.In a week when the Paris shows have been more attuned to what women actually wear than usual, McCartney used vintage fabric in a whole swathe of highly desirable dresses, although it was impossible to say what was new and what was not.One multi-coloured statement cord dress was made from vintage T-shirts that were stripped, knotted and then knitted.A run of feature earrings were inspired by office paperclips.‘I worship her’ The co-ed show also featured big burgundy fake fur coats worn with sawn-off Hunter wellington boots, which McCartney claimed were the most sustainable rubber wellies ever made.Her husband Alasdhair Willis is the creative director of the Scottish heritage bootmaker.The designer daughter of Beatle Paul McCartney told reporters backstage the Northern Soul music and dance movement that swept northern England from the late 1960s was also an inspiration for the show. A model presents a creation by Stella McCartney during the Fall-Winter 2019/2020 Ready-to-Wear collection fashion show in Paris, on March 4, 2019. — AFP pic Winfrey told reporters she “loved the show and totally supported” the campaign to save the Leuser Ecosystem in Indonesia, one of the richest in the world where orangutans and the Sumatran elephant, rhinoceros and tiger are threatened by the spread of palm oil plantations.The US television mogul made the trip specially to support McCartney’s campaign, having last year admitted that “I worship her”.Supermodel Karlie Kloss was also in the front row to lend her backing.The designer also roped in the veteran American artist Sheila Hicks, draping several of her looks in her woven “twisted and wrapped adornments... so they could be worn like badges of honour for valour and bravery. British fashion designer Stella McCartney acknowledges the audience at the end of the Stella McCartney Fall-Winter 2019/2020 Ready-to-Wear collection fashion show in Paris, on March 4, 2019. — AFP pic “These adornments act as wearable works of art,” McCartney added.As well as the slinky ethnic-tinted glamour, she put 17-year-old catwalk star Kaia Gerber — the daughter of Cindy Crawford — in one of her new trenchcoat jumpsuits aimed at “empowering men and women to look and feel their best”.It was the kind of garment that might give Formula One racing champion Lewis Hamilton, who now has his own fashion line with US brand Tommy Hilfiger, some ideas.The driver was also on the front row and said he saw McCartney as a role model for sustainable fashion.“My collection is 50 per cent recyclable and eco-friendly materials,” he told the fashion industry bible Women’s Wear Daily, but his goal was to soon go 100 per cent. — AFP [...]
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Apple needs to get into the folding game and save us from years of bad phones
I spent some time with the Huawei Mate X, and I have one takeaway: Apple, please make a folding phone. [...]
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Eating one hamburger a week will help save the planet
Good news, Earthlings! An international team of scientists reports that it is indeed possible to feed everyone on the planet a healthy and environmentally sustainable diet by the year 2050. All it will take is a wholesale, radical change to what foods we eat and the way we produce them. “We call it the Great Food Transformation,” said Jessica Fanzo, director of the Global Food Ethics and Policy Program at Johns Hopkins University in the United States. “While that may sound dramatic, we need big transformation and massive cooperation to meet this global challenge.” In a report published on Jan 16, 2019, in the journal Lancet, Fanzo, along with 36 colleagues from 16 countries, released a set of scientifically determined targets to guide food producers, food consumers and policy-makers toward creating a food system that will improve human health and the health of the planet. The proposed diet, based on a two-year review of hundreds of nutrition studies, is not as scary as one might think. Insects are not required eating. No one is asking anyone to become a vegan. The reference diet includes 2,500 calories per day, which is close to the global average today of 2,370. In the US, men consume 2,800 calories per day, while women consume between 2,000 and 2,200, according to the report. The authors say that red meat can still be on a globally sustainable menu, but in drastically reduced quantities. The diet allows for roughly one tablespoon of red meat per day. That’s the equivalent of one decent-sized hamburger a week or one steak a month. Dairy is not off the table, either. The target diet includes up to one glass of milk or other dairy product per day. For other protein sources, the researchers recommend roughly two servings of fish per week, and one-and-a-half eggs per week. The majority of calories on this diet comes from grains as they do today, but the authors emphasise that we need to shift to whole grains. They also want to see a 100% increase in the amount of legumes, nuts, and fruits and vegetables most of us consume, and for added sugars to become just 5% of our total caloric intake. “It is very consistent with many traditional diets, including the Mediterranean diet,” said Dr Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health who co-chaired the report. “This is not radical at all in many culinary traditions.” It would also lead to global improvements in human health. If everyone on the planet adapted these dietary rules, 11 million premature deaths would be avoided each year, he said. In order to keep this diet sustainable as the world’s population grows, the authors set goals for how our food is produced as well. These include a drastic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions associated with food production from 8.5 to 13.7 gigatons today to about five gigatons by 2050. Environmental targets also require a 50% reduction in food waste and a strict zero expansion of farmland. Sustainable food production will also require big changes in irrigation and fertiliser use, the authors said. Of the 7.6 billion people on Earth today, nearly one billion don’t have enough food, two billion are overweight or obese, and another two billion don’t get enough nutrients, the authors wrote. In addition, unhealthy diets are responsible for more deaths than unsafe sex, drugs, alcohol and tobacco use combined. Environmentally, global food production is currently responsible for 30% of global greenhouse-gas emissions and 70% of freshwater use, the authors said. Meanwhile, the conversion of natural ecosystems to farmland is the number one driver of extinction. Considering that the world is expected to have a population of 9.8 billion people by 2050, it is clear that a massive change is needed, the authors said. “It’s a win-win,” said Johan Rockstrom, professor of environmental science at Stockholm University in Sweden who worked on the study. “Adopting a healthy diet helps us deal with the climate and meet sustainable development goals.” Now all they have to do is get everyone on the planet to go along with it. – Los Angeles Times/Tribune News Service [...]
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Cervical Cancer Screenings Save Lives. So Why Aren’t More Women Getting Them?
The vast majority of cancers do not have one obvious cause, making them complex both to understand and treat. Cervical cancer is one of the few exceptions: “Virtually all” cases are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPV), according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Armed with this knowledge, experts have for decades stressed the importance of regular cervical cancer screenings, which can catch HPV infections and related abnormalities before they develop into deadly disease. And yet many women still don’t get tested as much as they should. The screening rate isn’t entirely clear. A study published last year found that, as of 2014, screening adherence ranged from a low of about 60% for women ages 50 to 65 to a high of 77% for women in their 30s. Meanwhile, a January Mayo Clinic report found that in one Minnesota county representative of many in the Midwest, cervical cancer screening rates were “unacceptably low,” hovering around 54% of women ages 21 to 29 and 65% of women ages 30 to 65. “Most of the cervical cancer cases in our country are either women that have never been screened previously, or that haven’t been screened regularly or that haven’t had follow-up [care] for abnormal results,” says Dr. Kathy MacLaughlin, a family-medicine physician at the Mayo Clinic who co-authored the new report. But why aren’t women getting screenings that could save their lives? Shifting guidelines are part of the problem, MacLaughlin says. For decades, women were advised to get a yearly Pap smear, a test that involves sampling cervical cells and examining them under a microscope. Then, in 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), one of the country’s leading preventative medicine authorities, began officially recommending waiting three years between tests. And in 2018, the USPSTF changed its recommendations again to say that most women ages 30 to 65 can get an HPV test — which looks for common viral strains directly — every five years, if they prefer that to a Pap smear every three. (Women ages 21 to 29 should still get a Pap smear every three years rather than an HPV test, according to the USPSTF.) MacLaughlin says the science behind these guidelines is sound, but she fears they’re causing more women to put off appointments, simply because of human nature. “If you are told you should do something every year to take care of yourself, it often turns into every two years,” she says. “And if we’re saying every three to five, that turns into four, five, six, seven years.” But an even larger issue, MacLaughlin says, is the barriers to access that prevent screening in the first place. Socioeconomic and geographic issues, like poverty or being unable to travel to or find time for appointments, can make it difficult for women to get in for testing — and those problems only compound if a screening uncovers abnormal results that needs follow-up care, which can be costly and inconvenient to schedule. Those obstacles partially explain why cervical cancer death rates are twice as high in low-income U.S. counties compared to affluent ones, according to a January American Cancer Society study. “If you’re coming from a lower-resource setting, that can get in the way of coming in and getting that screening performed,” MacLaughlin says. “If women were in a setting where they could have regular screening, or if it were available to them and affordable in their own setting, I don’t think we would see those disparities.” Past research has shown that strategies like one-on-one education, reminders and incentives from providers and media campaigns can help improve screening rates. Technology, however, has not traditionally been at the center of this effort. A new, artificial intelligence-powered algorithm developed by NCI researchers could change that. The algorithm works by analyzing cell-phone-quality images of a woman’s cervix and determining if it looks normal, precancerous or cancerous. Dr. Mark Schiffman, a member of NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and senior author of a new study about the innovation, says the tool is potentially powerful enough to halve global cervical cancer mortality among women ages 25 to 49, potentially within the next couple decades. “To see something that dead-on works is just thrilling,” Schiffman says. “These new algorithms are scarily fantastic.” Schiffman and his colleagues trained the algorithm using thousands of cervical images they’d collected over seven years of clinical research. They told the system whether each case had turned out to be normal, precancerous or cancerous. Once trained and presented with an array of cervical images, the algorithm was “capturing virtually all cases that turned into precancer or cancer — not just for that same day, but within the next seven years,” Schiffman says. It was so accurate, he says, that he “first looked at it and said, ‘This can’t be right.'” The tool isn’t ready for deployment yet, but Schiffman says it likely will be within two to three years. And when it is, he says it could revolutionize cervical cancer screening, particularly in areas of the world that are still relying on low-tech and somewhat inaccurate methods like visual inspection with acetic acid, through which health workers apply acetic acid to the cervix and look for visual changes that could indicate disease. The AI algorithm promises a precise and affordable solution that could be used not only by doctors, but also local health workers or personnel at traveling health fairs, Schiffman says. The tool is also fast-acting: If the algorithm finds abnormalities, a woman could near-instantaneously get treatment — which, for many early-stage cases, usually just entails freezing affected cells [...]
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Najib denies WSJ report on China deal to save 1MDB
Datuk Seri Najib Razak today denied the reports published by the Wall Street Journal regarding the deal between his administration and China to rescue 1MDB. — Picture by Ahmad Zamzahuri KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 8 — Former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak today denied the reports published by US-based newspaper the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) regarding the deal between his administration and China to rescue 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB).WSJ had earlier reported that China had offered the former Barisan Nasional (BN) government under Najib a deal to bail out 1MDB in return for contracts here that would further its ambitious “One Belt, One Road” agenda.In a Facebook posting, Najib said the bailout never happened and maintained that all projects awarded to China-based companies including the East Coast Rail Link (ECRL) and the Trans-Sabah Pipeline were not above the market price.“Malaysia will continue to keep its agreement with Abu Dhabi-owned IPIC and ensure that all the money allegedly missing from 1MDB will be returned before December 31, 2020.“There has been no accusation that the gas pipe project was extraordinarily expensive. The Trans-Sabah Gas Pipeline awarded to a Chinese company in 2016 with a 662km length is worth RM4.06 billion.“In comparison, the Sabah-Sarawak Gas Pipeline Project that was 500km long and was awarded to an Indian-based consortium in 2008 was completed with RM4.6 billion cost,” Najib defended.The Pekan MP said he did his best to defend the RM55 billion ECRL and tried to lay the blame on the East Coast Economic Region Development Council which proposed the project back in 2007.He added that the Pakatan Harapan government that accused the ECRL project of being above the market value of RM30 billion, had never shown any evidence to prove this.The embattled former prime minister who has been accused of multiple accounts of corruption and abuses of power said the RM30 billion was based on 2009 study for a length of 545km in comparison to the final length of 620km.Najib also refuted claims that China was going to use its influence in the US to ensure that any charges on the 1MDB mega financial scandal will be dropped.“WSJ itself has reported that the US government is continuing its investigations. WSJ also reported that the Chinese government had offered to spy on their journalists... but this never happened either,” he said. [...]
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Doucoure comes off the bench to save Watford
(Reuters) - WATFORD 1 NEWCASTLE UNITED 1 [...]
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Dr M: Only Malays can save the Malays
PUTRAJAYA: The bumiputra can only rely on themselves if they want to better their plight and not be sidelined in their own homeland, says Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia chairman Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad. [...]
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Medical News Today: High-tech epilepsy warning device could save lives
An innovative piece of wearable tech could reduce the risk of death from nighttime seizures for individuals with therapy-resistant epilepsy. [...]
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Ole Gunnar Solskjaer: Can Man Utd manager save club from worst-ever Premier League season?
OLE GUNNAR SOLSKJAER has been confirmed as caretaker manager of Manchester United - but can he prevent the club from finishing with a record-low Premier League points tally? [...]
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Khairy calls for 'immediate' party election to save UMNO
(Dec 14): Former Umno Youth chief Khairy Jamaluddin has called for an “immediate” party election to save UMNO. Khairy, who is still the MP for Rembau,... [...]
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NCDs: Diagnose early and control well to save money
Two significant announcements on the health sector were made in the Finance Minister’s budget speech in November 2018, i.e. the B40 Health Protection Fund and the nationwide health screening programme, Skim Perlindungan Kesihatan (Peka). The minister stated that “the Government will pilot a national B40 Health Protection Fund to provide free protection against the top four critical illnesses for up to RM8,000 and up to 14 days of hospitalisation income cover at RM50 per day”. Since then, it has been announced that the number of illnesses has been increased to 36. Illness does not recognise classifications into B40, M40 or T20, which is based on a monetary number and does not take into account family size, cost of living at place of residence, etc. Everyone knows that the same ringgit has different purchasing power in different parts of the country. Many Malaysians have incurred catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) when there is a critical illness like heart attack, stroke, cancer, etc. Some households have had to borrow money or sell assets to finance their healthcare; earn less due to deteriorated health condition(s); become impoverished after paying for healthcare services; and become even poorer for those already below the poverty line, due to healthcare expenditures. The reports of CHE studies in Malaysia are disturbing, to say the least. An Asean study reported that the proportion of previously solvent patients who experienced economic hardship following a cancer diagnosis was highest in Malaysia (45%) and Indonesia (42%), and lowest in Thailand (16%). A National Heart Institute (IJN) study concluded that the economic impact of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Malaysia “was considerable and the prospect of economic hardship likely to persist over the years due to the long-standing nature of IHD”. B40 Health Protection Fund Whether the B40 will benefit from the Health Protection Fund is a moot question when they already have access to virtually free healthcare at public healthcare clinics and hospitals. Whether consideration has been given to the size of private hospital bills is pertinent. The total bill for some acute conditions in private hospitals may amount to RM8,000 or less. However, many private hospital bills exceed RM8,000, particularly in critical illnesses that are chronic in nature, e.g. heart attack, stroke and cancer. When the insurance or personal financial limit is reached, transfer to a public hospital will almost always be inevitable. However, the fact that has not been made known is the current practice of the imposition of the First Class treatment charges under the Fees (Medical) (Amendment) Order 2017 on all patients referred from private hospitals. These First Class treatment charges are considerably higher than those for patients referred from public clinics or hospitals. Unless the practice is changed, anyone in the B40 Health Protection Fund can end up saddled with hefty bills, i.e. CHE from both private and public hospitals, particularly when there is a chronic condition. It would be more advantageous for the B40 not to enrol in the Health Protection Fund and continue to access healthcare from public clinics and hospitals as they are doing now. A little-known fact is that patients who transfer from a private hospital to a public one, as seen in this filepic, have to pay First Class fees. Non-communicable diseases The other announcement was that the Health Ministry will pilot a nationwide health screening programme, Peka, for 800,000 individuals aged 50 and above in B40 households at a cost of RM100 million. According to the 2015 National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS), about two-thirds of Malaysians have at least one of three non-communicable diseases (NCDs), i.e. diabetes, high blood pressure (hypertension) or high blood lipids (hypercholesterolaemia). More than one in four (26.3%) have at least two of these NCDs and 7.2% have all three NCDs. These three NCDs are not confined to the B40, but are also prevalent in the M40 and T20. The prevalence in those aged more than 18 years of age for: • high blood pressure was 30.3%. The condition was diagnosed in 13.1% and undiagnosed in 17.2%, i.e. for every two persons diagnosed with high blood pressure, there were three undiagnosed. • diabetes was 17.7%. The condition was diagnosed in 8.3% and undiagnosed in 9.2%, i.e. for every eight persons diagnosed with diabetes, there were nine undiagnosed. • high blood lipids was 47.7%. The condition was diagnosed in 9.1% and undiagnosed in 38.6%, i.e. for every one person diagnosed with high blood lipids, there were four undiagnosed. Of those diagnosed with: • high blood pressure, only 35.7% had been on treatment, and 9.6% had blood pressure controlled under treatment • diabetes, only 38% had blood glucose levels within treatment targets (NHMS 2015). • high blood lipids, only 45% and 37% of those treated at public hospitals and private clinics respectively, had their total blood cholesterol levels controlled. However, this data from the NHMS 2015 was limited by no distinction between LDL and HDL cholesterol. In short, the prevalence of undiagnosed high blood pressure, diabetes and high blood lipids was high, and of those who were diagnosed, control was poor. Everyone whose NCD is diagnosed and well-controlled will benefit from better health and fewer complications. Consequently, the country’s disease burden and expenditure from secondary and tertiary care will be contained, if not reduced, with early detection and better control. Better value for money A reassignment of the allocation for the Health Protection Fund to reduce undiagnosed and poorly-controlled NCDs will ensure that the B40s are not saddled with CHE. It will also contain and reduce the disease burden of NCDs; and contain the country’s healthcare expenditure in the medium and long-term. The private registered medical practitioners (RMPs) can play significant roles in this res [...]
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May hints at Brexit backstop vote to save ailing deal
By BLOOMBERG LONDON • Prime Minister (PM) Theresa May suggested yesterday that MPs may get to decide whether Britain eventually joins the “backstop” plan to avoid post-Brexit border checks with Ireland. May told BBC Radio that she was looking at allowing lawmakers a vote on the arrangement, which would keep the country in a customs union with the European Union (EU) after the end of the proposed Brexit transition period in December 2020. The alternative, according to the deal struck between May and the EU, would be to extend the transition period for up to two years, during which time Britain would largely enjoy the same relationship with the bloc, despite officially leaving on March 29, 2019. “We’re looking at this question around the backstop and the role of Parliament,” May said. “The backstop is talked about as if it’s automatic. Actually it’s not automatic. There is a choice. “The question is do we go into the backstop, do we extend…the transition period? I’m exploring.” May is drumming up support for her deal, but faces daunting odds with scores of her own MPs set to vote against the government on Dec 11. The Conservative PM commands a slim working majority in Parliament thanks to a deal with Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which is fiercely opposed to her plan. DUP leader Nigel Dodds said his party would vote against the deal, but would not move to bring down May’s government. “If it (the deal) is defeated, it would be somewhat illogical — having achieved our aim trying to get to a better deal — it would be illogical then to turn around the next day and say ‘let’s vote the government out’,” he told ITV. “I think then we start on a process to try to get a better deal,” he added. The backstop issue is the key sticking point, with official legal advice suggesting Britain could get indefinitely stuck in a customs arrangement, having no power to unilaterally withdraw. According to media reports, May’s office has attempted to win over rebellious backbenchers by suggesting that MPs may even be able to vote on rejecting both options of the deal, but was rebuffed by leading Brexiteers. Conservative MP Jacob Rees- Mogg, leader of the influential eurosceptic ERG group, told the Daily Mail that such a proposal would mean ripping up the Withdrawal Agreement and renegotiating it entirely, something the EU has ruled out. MPs were to hold a third day of debates on the deal yesterday, focusing on its economic impacts. May’s fragile position was laid bare on Tuesday with a stunning series of defeats in parliamentary votes. MPs backed an amendment that will give them a bigger say in what happens if May’s deal is voted down and also forced her to publish the official legal advice. A defeat for the PM next week could trigger a no-confidence vote leading to early elections, leaving the Brexit process in chaos. var VUUKLE_EMOTE_SIZE = "90px"; VUUKLE_EMOTE_IFRAME = "180px" var EMOTE_TEXT = ["HAPPY","INDIFFERENT","AMUSED","EXCITED","ANGRY","SAD"]The post May hints at Brexit backstop vote to save ailing deal appeared first on The Malaysian Reserve. [...]
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Crowdfunding initiative to save Seafield Temple raises RM2 million so far
PETALING JAYA: News that RM2 million has already been pledged towards the ‘Save Seafield Temple Fund’ so far, brought some cheer to the management and devotees gathered at the Sri Maha Mariamman Hindu temple in USJ 25 today.The news was greeted with loud applause when Berjaya Group Founder Tan Sri Vincent Tan announced that the amount had been reached with a RM500,000 donation pledged by businessman Datuk Anathkumar Alagu.Another RM1.5 million had been pledged by Tan, who started the ball rolling by pledging RM500,000 on Friday, and was almost immediately joined by Tan Sri Barry Goh who previously headed MCT Bhd and Nirvana Group founder Tan Sri David Kong, both of whom had matched his donation.Tan, who had mooted the crowdfunding initiative to buy the land on which the temple stands from the landowner, visited the temple this evening.Speaking at a press conference together with Water, Land and Natural Resources Dr Xavier Jayakumar, Tan said he decided to step in to raise funds and assist in the negotiations, as he was disturbed by the hostility and violence that followed a court order on the temple’s relocation.“This should not be happening in our peaceful country Malaysia. We of all different races have co-existed for so long.“The landowner and majority shareholder is a Philippines based company called Ayala Corporation. They own 66% of the land. They are a very respectable company and I understand are very charitable and do a lot of CSR (corporate social responsibility) projects.“So when the bosses know the situation is like this, I am sure they will come up with some good solutions. We will discuss matters with them and wait for their decision. Perhaps they will give us a discount on the sale of the land or even give it away,“ he added.Tan also pledged to donate RM50,000 to the 24-year-old fireman Muhammad Adib Mohd Kassim, who was severely injured after being assaulted by protestors at the temple early on Monday last week.“I hope they will forgive the people responsible, and God willing, Adib will fully recover with time and medical treatment and be able to resume his duties as a fireman,“ he said, adding he was relieved that to hear that Muhammad Adib had regained consciousness and was showing positive signs of recovery.“Please don’t quarrel or fight. Why do we need to fight? Malaysia is our country. It’s a good country. We are under a new government now and have a great prime minister who works so hard at the age of 93,“ he said after meeting with the temple’s task force committee on the relocation.Meanwhile, Xavier said the rule of law still applies to the case and that there was a court order on the eviction of the temple.“The court order still stands and this should not set a precedence to other temples in a similar situation in future. We will be enacting laws on this.“Only Ayala is in a position to drop the court case. As for now, the temple will not be touched,“ he added.However, he said discussions will be held with the landowner, who are prepared to hear out proposals and suggestions.“We are in touch with them and there are some technicalities to be sorted out,“ said Xavier, who lauded the initiative of Tan and other wellwishers to purchase the land to keep the temple as it is.Pertubuhan Pusat Aduan Rakyat Malaysia President Datuk A. Chandrakumanan, who is a member of the temple’s task force, expressed the hope that more people will come forward to contribute towards the fund so that the temple will remain at its current location for good. [...]
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Drive like it's the 80s: Don't rely on car tech to save you
Lane departure warning systems, adaptive cruise control, collision avoidance: Cars are smarter than ever thanks to countless assistance systems. But experts say that also increases the risk of drivers becoming inattentive and letting their car take over. [...]
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