Security

WhatsApp, security and spyware: What happened
The WhatsApp messaging application is seen on a phone screen. — Reuters pic WASHINGTON, May 17 — Facebook-owned WhatsApp’s revelation of a security flaw allowing hackers to inject spyware on smartphones raised fresh concerns about the security of the mobile ecosystem.Here are five key questions and answers:What happened to WhatsApp?The security hole in the WhatsApp messaging app could enable an attacker to inject malware to gain access to Android or Apple smartphones.WhatsApp patched the flaw this week after being informed that the spyware was being used to track human rights activists and lawyers.Security researchers believe the attackers used the powerful Pegasus spyware from Israel-based NSO Group. According to a recent analysis of the software by the security firm Lookout, Pegasus can “subvert” the device’s security and “steals the victim’s contact list and GPS location, as well as personal, Wi-Fi, and router passwords stored on the device”.The infection could take root with a simple call through WhatsApp. To make matters worse, victims may not know their phones were infected because the malware allowed attackers to erase call histories.This delivery was “particularly scary”, said security researcher John Dickson of the Denim Group, because it infected devices without any user action.“Normally a user has to click on something or go to a site, but that wasn’t the case here,” Dickson said. “And once (the attacker) is in, they own the device, they can do anything.”Who is to blame?While the flaw was discovered in WhatsApp, security experts say any application could have been a “vehicle” for the spyware payload.“We have not yet been able to write software that doesn’t have bugs or flaws,” said Joseph Hall, chief technologist for the Centre for Democracy & Technology, a digital rights group.Hall said the encryption in WhatsApp was not broken and that “Facebook’s response was exceedingly fast.”Marc Lueck of the security firm Zscaler said that based on Facebook’s response, “You should give them kudos for discovering it in the first place, this was a very deep vulnerability.”The intrusion at WhatsApp “wasn’t an attack on encryption, it was an attack on another element of the application” said Lueck.Is encryption still worthwhile?Encryption remains an important feature by establishing a secure “tunnel” between two parties that verifies their identities, Lueck noted.“Encryption isn’t important just for privacy, it’s important for trust,” he said.Encryption used by WhatsApp and other messaging applications prevents eavesdropping on messages and conversations but does not protect against an attack that gains access to the device itself, researchers note.“End to end encryption does nothing to protect against attacks on your endpoint, true. And seatbelts and airbags do nothing to prevent your car from being hit by a meteorite,” tweeted Matt Blaze, a Georgetown University computer security expert.“While neither protects against every possible harm, they both remain the most effective defences against very common harm.”Dickson said that while no encryption is foolproof, the only way to completely avoid hacking would be to avoid electronics entirely: “You could use guys on horseback.”Should I worry about being attacked?Citizen Lab, a research centre at the University of Toronto, said in a 2018 report that it found Pegasus spyware infections in 45 countries, with 36 “probable government operators”.NSO maintains it delivers its software for legitimate law enforcement and intelligence purposes. But the Toronto researchers said it had been obtained by countries with “dubious” human rights records and suggested it may have been used by Saudi Arabia to track and kill dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi.Citizen Lab researchers wrote in the Globe & Mail that they “unearthed at least 25 cases of abusive targeting of advocacy groups, lawyers, scientists and researchers, investigators into mass disappearances and media members.”But Lueck said programs such as Pegasus are extremely costly and cannot easily be monetised by hackers for profit.“Your average person is not the target of this specific piece of software, which is built to sell to governments to target individuals and doesn’t work on a large scale,” he said.Still, Lueck said the flaw underscores the fact that “the mobile phone ecosystem has become as insecure and as vulnerable a platform as the computer”.Do governments need better digital tools? The revelations come as governments seek better tools to track criminals and extremists using encrypted messaging. An Australian law requires tech giants to remove electronic protections and help with access to devices or services.Law enforcement agencies have complained of “going dark” in the face of encrypted electronic communications as they investigate serious crimes like terrorism and child sex offenses.But Hall said that the news about Pegasus shows governments have tools to exploit software flaws for specific targeting without weakening encryption and privacy for all users.“You can target the delivery at specific people rather than breaking into everyone’s phone at once,” he said. — AFP [...]
Save
WhatsApp hack latest breach of personal data security
The hacking of WhatsApp is one of the most spectacular of a series of such attacks in recent years. [...]
Save
Horse racing – Maximum Security owner to appeal Kentucky Derby DQ, skip Preakness
(Reuters) - The owner of Maximum Security, the horse that finished first in the Kentucky Derby but later disqualified for interference, said on Monday he would file an appeal with the state racing commission and not run the bay colt in the Preakness Stakes. [...]
Save
After year as home minister, Muhyiddin happy with gains in police revamp, security laws review and tighter borders
Home Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin speaks during a media interview in Putrajaya May 2, 2019. — Picture by Mukhriz Hazim PUTRAJAYA, May 6 — As the new home minister, Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin knew several key Pakatan Harapan (PH) reform pledges came under the responsibility of his ministry.He immediately set his sights on solving long-standing issues and the three things he focused on was changing the image of the Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM), reviewing six draconian security laws and improving border security in the country.Almost a year later, the Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia (Bersatu) president said progress in these three areas were simultaneously his ministry’s best achievements to date and largest remaining obstacles.Muhyiddin said while some portions of the reforms were still work in progress, he is happy with the progress so far.“Some of the things I consider as achievements are also still in the process of being implemented.“But the progress we have made so far despite the challenges faced has been positive,” he said during a special interview ahead of PH’s first anniversary held at the ministry last week.Changing the public’s perception of the policeMuhyiddin said among the promises the government made was to transform the PDRM into a respected force and to correct Malaysians’ views of the police.“In relation to enforcement actions, people need to know that when police are arresting people, that it is their responsibility in protecting the people and maintaining security in the country.“We need to change the public’s perception that is not positive against the police force.“To improve this we have reviewed all standard operating procedures (SOP) used by police, even though these have been implemented for a long time, so that we can avoid any misunderstandings when it comes to enforcement actions,” he said.He said the SOPs were being reviewed to ensure police enforcement is not seen as inhumane.Muhyiddin added that efforts to lower the crime rate in the country have always been the priority of the police force.“PDRM in the last one year has taken many initiatives among them is the ‘Bandar Selamat’ programme, which involves installation of closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras equipped with high-resolution technology.“We are working on improving the CCTV infrastructure with the help of local councils nationwide in order to make people feel safe,” he said.Review of draconian lawsMuhyiddin said PH has not backtracked from its election pledges to address six controversial security laws.He announced that the ministry has completed two Bills for the purpose of amending the Security Offences (Special Measures) Act 2012 or Sosma and the Peaceful Assembly Act 2012 (PAA).“The draft to amend the PAA has obtained the approval from the Attorney-General’s Chambers and will be brought to the Cabinet soon for a decision.“I am confident that this Bill will be tabled in the coming Parliament session,” he said.The other four laws related to national security that PH also pledged to address include the Sedition Act 1948, Prevention of Crime Act 1959 (Poca), Prevention of Terrorism Act 2015 (Pota) and the Printing Presses and Publications Act 1984 (PPPA).Muhyiddin said in order to speed up the process, two committees were formed last year to review all six laws.“This shows we are serious in making amendments to the law, we are focused and know that the bottom line is that we need to bring changes that are beneficial and will protect the people,” he said.He added that the government will achieve its goal to formulate laws on security that can balance the need to protect the country against the preservation of fundamental rights as guaranteed in the Federal Constitu­tion.Improving border and national securityThe third challenge-cum-achievement Muhyiddin touted was improving border security by ensuring the proper deployment of assets.He said the ministry gave special focus to securing Sabah given its porous borders and to protect the state’s residents from another incident such as the Lahad Datu intrusion by gunmen from the Philippines in 2013.He said the ministry first met with logistical problems but addressed this enhancing the Eastern Sabah Security Command (Esscom).“The responsibility of guarding the country’s border has always been the priority of several agencies under the Home Ministry such as Border Security Agency (Aksem), Immigration Department, Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) and PDRM.“Reinforcement in all these agencies has overall improved border security,” he said.Muhyiddin said together with the Human Resource Ministry, a special task-force was formed to solve the issue of illegal immigrants.“Studies are being conducted on the demand for foreign workers which will assist in creating a system to manage illegal immigrants in a more holistic way. From January to March this year, 11,234 illegal immigrants were arrested for various offences.“But we know that the illegal immigrants will crop up again and that is why now the focus is also about going after the heads of syndicates involved in smuggling immigrants into the country,” he said.Muhyiddin said one reason for the influx of illegal immigrants in the country was employers who engage syndicates to hire foreign workers in their bid to lower costs.“This is why we need the help of everyone, including state governments, community leaders and even village heads to channel information to us so that we can take action,” he said. Muhyiddin said the Home Ministry in the last one year under the PH administration has taken to heart the spirit of Malaysia Baru and committed to improving its integrity and transparency, protecting the people’s rights, and being tough on crime. [...]
Save
Vodafone identified Huawei security flaw decade ago
British telecoms group Vodafone tackled a security flaw with Huawei technology a decade ago, it was revealed amid widespread concerns over the Chinese giant developing 5G networks abroad. [...]
Save
Sri Lanka’s Muslims hold subdued prayers amid tight security
Some mosques in Sri Lanka cancelled Friday prayers, while other worshippers said they wanted to stand up to extremists. AFP Photo Armed police and sniffer dogs guarded mosques in Sri Lanka as Muslims trickled to Friday prayers, with many staying away over fears of revenge attacks after the island’s Easter suicide blasts. Some mosques cancelled prayers, and Sri Lanka’s Muslim affairs minister called on Muslims to pray at home instead, in solidarity with churches that have closed over security fears. Other Muslims have expressed fears that they could be targeted by Islamist hardliners, after the community’s religious leadership said the attackers would not be buried at mosques in the country. Among mosques that did hold prayers on Friday in the capital Colombo, attendance was thin, with some worshippers saying they wanted to stand up to extremists. “We are sending a message to extremists that we will not be scared or deterred,” said Reyyaz Salley, chairman of the Dawatagaha Jumma mosque. “But the main reason we are here is because we want to say a special prayer for the victims of the church bombings,” he added. At least 253 people died when attackers blew themselves up at three churches and three hotels Sunday in coordinated blasts that officials blame on local Islamist group National Thowheeth Jama’ath. The Islamic State group has claimed the attacks. The bombings have been condemned by leaders of Sri Lanka’s Muslim minority but some in the community still fear a backlash from other religious groups. Around two dozen police and other armed personnel guarded the Dawatagaha Jumma mosque, which has been threatened by hardline Islamists in the past because it contains a Sufi shrine, which extremists consider idolatrous. Police prevented people from walking or parking vehicles directly outside after rumours circulating on social media about possible car bomb attacks. Sniffer dogs stood guard as police checked bags and patted down worshippers and journalists before letting them inside. “We are not scared. We have to die one day and it can happen anywhere,” a defiant Salley told AFP. Many had been put off, however. Salley said Friday prayers at the Dawatagaha Jumma mosque regularly attract up to 700 worshippers, but only around 100 turned up this week. Prayers were also cut short from the usual one hour to just 15 minutes because of the security situation, with the mosque’s imam telling worshippers that the Prophet Mohammed would have condemned the attacks. After prayers around two dozen worshippers held up banners condemning the attacks and pledging solidarity with the Christian community. “Suicide has no place in Islam”, read one. “Calling all political and religious leaders to unite and keep our motherland intact”, said another. “This mosque is open for your Mass,” read a third. Some 330 kilometres (205 miles) away in Muslim-majority Kattankudy on Sri Lanka’s east coast, people turned out in greater numbers. More than 1,000 men and boys attended prayers at the town’s main Mohiuddin Methaipali Jumma mosque. “The attacks were carried out by a small group of people but some people are blaming the whole Sri Lankan Muslim community for this. It is not fair,” mosque official Mohammed Ramesh told AFP. “The people who did this are not human beings. All Sri Lankans must unite against this: Buddhists, Christians, Hindus and Muslims. “I have been praying five times a day for the Christian victims since the attacks happened,” he added. Mohammed Farook Mohammed Shibly, 44, said he had been fasting from sunrise to sunset — more than 13 hours a day — in tribute to the victims. “It was very shocking for us… especially because churches were targeted,” he said. “We strongly condemn this barbaric act.” “The All Ceylon Jamiyyathul Ulama asked people to fast… to request Allah to make this country calm and peaceful again,” he said, referring to a group of Muslim leaders. “I have been fasting for two days and I will continue fasting until the situation is normal. I can make this sacrifice.” – AFP Facebook 0 Messenger Twitter 0 WhatsApp Email Print The post Sri Lanka’s Muslims hold subdued prayers amid tight security appeared first on Borneo Post Online. [...]
Save
Equal ECRL joint venture with China not a security threat, MRL tells Najib
A man looks at a map of the East Coast Rail Link (ECRL) during a ground-breaking ceremony in Tunjong, Kota Baru, April 11, 2018. — Bernama pic KUALA LUMPUR, April 17 — Malaysia Rail Link (MRL) Sdn Bhd today rebutted Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s claim that the 50:50 joint venture with China on the East Coast Rail Link (ECRL) could pose a security threat, claiming that the workings of the country’s internal details could be exposed to foreigners.In a statement today, MRL pointed out that there are inherent differences between a joint operation and ownership, adding that the collaboration between Malaysia and China does not cede ownership of the ECRL to the republic, via the China Communications Construction Company (CCCC).“The 50:50 joint venture (JV) company between MRL and CCCC will not pose any threat to national security, as the JV company will be under the management of Malaysia.“The directors of the JV company and the appointment of the chief executive officer will be at the discretion of the MRL,” the statement read.MRL said that the Malaysian government will fully own all of ECRL’s assets via MRL, “from the beginning to the end of the joint MOM arrangement.”MOM refers to the joint Management, Operation and Maintenance of the ECRL.“We must distinguish between ownership and joint operations. The joint operations arrangement does not in any way whatsoever involve ceding any form of ownership of the ECRL to CCCC.“It is purely about the sharing of MOM costs, plus the exchange of technical know-how and expertise between CCCC and MRL,” MRL added.The former prime minister had yesterday commented on CCCC’s alleged role to manage, operate and maintain the ECRL in a joint-venture with MRL.He asserted that Malaysians have the capabilities to manage the entire rail system, as they have long trained professionals for this particular role.The Prime Minister’s Office on Friday announced that the construction cost for Phases 1 and 2 of the ECRL has now been now reduced to RM44 billion, a reduction of RM21.5 billion from its original cost of RM65.5 billion.The mega project was initially suspended after Pakatan Harapan defeated Barisan Nasional to win over Putrajaya, owing to its egregious cost. [...]
Save
Liew: Army veterans can still contribute to economy and security
Deputy Defence Minister Liew Chin Tong speaks during the inaugural Perwira dialogue by the Ministry of Defence in Kuala Lumpur January 22, 2019. — Picture by Hari Anggara KUALA LUMPUR, April 9 — Deputy Defence Minister Senator Liew Chin Tong today said that Malaysians should appreciate the skills of Armed Forces veterans, particularly those who retired early as they are still able to contribute to the country’s development and economy.“Many do not understand the skills acquired by veteran soldiers. The public assumes that these veterans are unable to perform anything but in reality these people have skills.“Employers need to understand that many of these veterans comprised of different military background such as medical and engineering that possesses skills ready to be taken advantage of.“This is change in paradigm for Mindef and the Malaysian Armed Forces Veteran Affairs Department (JHEV) to focus our efforts on employers giving these veterans the recognition so that they can become part of an important source of labour for society,” he said during a Radio Televisyen Malaysia’s Bicara Inspirasi talk show programme tonight.He said Mindef is currently in talks with the Home Ministry on the issue of security guards in the country and are looking at ways to improve it through the use of veteran soldiers.“Employers prefer to hire Nepalese with a much lower wage. Now we are trying to change their mindset whether we can pay a higher wage and reduce the number of foreign security guards.“I think veterans are the most suitable frontliners to execute our total defence concept because they were once part of the nation’s security force and are able to become the ‘eyes and ears’ of the enforcement team,” he said.Liew pointed out that many of the young veterans who completed their mandatory 21 years of military service have voiced their concerns that existing wages were as low as RM1,500 and it discouraged them from seeking further employment after their retirement.“They go back to their hometown and perform odd-jobs, leading to the loss of their skills for the economy.“Veterans are a group of special and important people in society. They have contributed time, health and their youth to defend the country which is why welfare assistance upon their retirement is a key issue not just in Malaysia but other countries as well,” he said.Liew said it was imperative to give the Armed Forces a new life by taking on the responsibility to educate the public on the role of the military veterans.“I admit this feat is not easy as it needs time and cooperation with all. It will not happen in a day. Therefore, I urge the veterans to be patient with us,” he said.  [...]
Save
Private security services industry plays important role in country’s economy – Dr M
Dr Mahathir Mohamad KUALA LUMPUR: Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today stressed that the private security services industry played an important role in contributing to the country’s economy, both directly and indirectly. He said the industry was capable of bringing in sophisticated security technology to country, and at the same time, potentially produce security innovations that could be marketed locally and abroad. “This is where the challenge lies for security services industry operators, which is to balance their responsibilities as entrepreneurs and at the same time, deliver creative and innovative security products. “When a sense of security can be created within the society, people from all walks of life can go on with their activities and this includes businesses and services,” he said at the 2019 Malaysian Security Services Industry Excellence Awards tonight. Also present were Home Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin and the Security Services Association of Malaysia president Datuk Seri Mustapa Ali. Dr Mahathir said countries were faced with a big challenge in ensuring security of their peoples was assured in the face of various security issues like terrorism, trans-border crimes and non-traditional threats. “As such, private security services play an important role is assisting the police in crime prevention by channeling information and cooperating with the authorities to create a safe environment in the areas under their jurisdiction,” he said. Meanwhile, Dr Mahathir said the government would continue with the implementation of the Certified Security Guards (CSG) programme that is being jointly undertaken by the association and the Royal Malaysia Police to improve the image of the industry. He said the government was also committed to produce skilled workers for the industry including by strengthening Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). It will also include collaboration with public universities in the country to develop programmes specifically for the industry, apart from producing managerial level personnel who are more skilled and professional. – Bernama Facebook 0 Messenger Twitter 0 WhatsApp Email Print The post Private security services industry plays important role in country’s economy – Dr M appeared first on Borneo Post Online. [...]
Save
Bukit Aman to step up security at sensitive locations, including places of worship
KUALA LUMPUR: Bukit Aman will increase security at sensitive locations nationwide, including places of worship, following the terrorist attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, says Deputy Comm Datuk Ayob Khan. [...]
Save
Huawei opens Brussels security lab in bid to reassure EU
China’s Huawei opens Brussels security lab, stepping up effort to win over EU policymakers. [...]
Save
Apple tied to new privacy website, suggesting future security marketing     – CNET
The iPhone maker, which makes privacy a selling point for its devices, appears to be gearing up for another marketing push with PrivacyIsImportant.com. [...]
Save
Data leak exposes 364 million Chinese social media profiles tracked by police surveillance programme, security researcher says
Records include sensitive information like private chats, file transfers, real names, and ID numbers. [...]
Save
5G presents security challenge for telecom operators
Unlike upgrades of wireless networks in the past, 5G will deliver not just faster phone and computer data but also help connect up cars, appliances, cargo and crop equipment. ― AFP pic BARCELONA, Feb 28 ― While Washington's concerns that future 5G wireless networks could be vulnerable to spying by China have dominated headlines, businesses have long been pushing to make sure the technology is as secure as possible.With fifth-generation wireless networks, or 5G, starting to be rolled out this year, the issue of 5G security was in focus at the Mobile World Congress trade fair which got under way Monday in Barcelona.Unlike upgrades of wireless networks in the past, 5G will deliver not just faster phone and computer data but also help connect up cars, appliances, cargo and crop equipment.Washington has warned that allowing Chinese firms like Huawei to provide the equipment to build 5G networks could leave them vulnerable to spying on the part of China but this is only one of the risks.5G's much faster speeds, vast data capacity and lower latency ― or response time ― are expected to underpin entirely new technologies such as self-driving cars and telemedicine ― which in turn may attract cyberintrusions by criminals or terrorists.“There will be more data which will be transferred...it is clear that security is much more complicated,” said Yannick Sadowy, the director for telecoms and media at consulting firm Accenture.Mathieu Lagrange, who is responsible for internet security at <b>com institute, said the risks to 5G's security “were taken into account” when the norms for the technology were established.But a study by the University of Lorraine in France found that the new wireless network still contains some security holes which were already present in previous networks, 3G and 4G.5G offers “improved data protection when compared to the previous wireless norms” but “flaws persist and the weaknesses that have been identified” could allow “several cyberattacks and have an impact on the protection of privacy,” it said.Experts say the architecture of 5G networks also presents entirely new security challenges.Fifth generation wireless networks use “network virtualisation”, which refers to moving some resources which have traditionally been delivered in physical hardware to a virtual software-based network.It is designed to allow the network to make better use of data transfer rates and provide more flexibility to 5G networks.“Operators are moving from a hardware system to a virtualised and fully automated one,” said Darren Anstee, technology director at Netscout, which provides software for networks.“Security is about visibility, when you can't see everything on your network, this is when you have a problem,” he added.Nothing 100 per cent secure 5G allows for the available bandwidth to be split up into channels, each of which is independent from others and can be separately  secured, which some experts say can help boost security.“We can create a kind of micro-networks, with different levels of security. The idea is to compartmentalise the network according to different uses,” said Laurent Boutet, a systems engineer at US computer networking company F5Network.Mobile communications industry body GSMA, which stages the Mobile World Congress, estimates the number of connected devices will triple to 25 billion by 2025.For Dexter Thillien, an analysts at Fitch Solutions, the main challenge for security is this rise in the “number of entry points, considering the exponential number of objects which will be connected.”“From the point of view of security, the network itself is secondary,” he said.“You have to keep in mind that nothing will ever be 100 per cent secure. We still don't have a precise idea of how billions or even trillions of connected objects could affect networks, it is still unknown at this point,” said Thillien. ― AFP [...]
Save
Europe calls for facts not fears in Huawei security row
Huawei chairperson Guo Ping delivers a keynote speech at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona on February 26, 2019. — AFP pic BARCELONA, Feb 27 — Facts not fears should decide the future of telecoms network security in Europe, industry leaders and policy chiefs said this week, brushing off US calls for a ban on Chinese vendors.Europe has become the main battleground in a US campaign to rid Western networks of Chinese telecoms equipment, with Washington accusing Huawei Technologies of spying for Beijing, allegations the company has repeatedly denied.Mobile operators warn that a blanket ban could delay next-generation 5G connections by years and comments from the world's second-largest mobile operator Vodafone and European Commission officials at this week's Mobile World Congress in Barcelona suggest a more cautious response is likely.“You're going to see a messy, essentially managed response that will probably vary in detail from country to country,” said Forrester analyst Frank Gillett. “In the end it's about containing and managing the risk of Huawei, as well as any other vendor, but particularly Huawei.”The security concerns are particularly acute because of the onset of 5G, with operators now making decisions which will govern the future of mobile networks slated to bring super-fast speeds for everything from computer gaming to medical surgery.Huawei chairman Guo Ping met government and industry partners in Barcelona to give reassurances in the face of the US accusations, people with knowledge of the matter said.“Let experts decide whether networks are safe or not. The US security accusation of our 5G has no evidence, nothing,” Guo told the congress yesterday.His comments echoed those of Vodafone boss Nick Read, who called on Monday for the United States to share any evidence it had about Huawei, while the European Commission warned against “premature decisions based on partial analysis of the facts.”Listening modeUS officials, however, insisted that behind the scenes in Barcelona European governments were increasingly listening to Washington's message on Huawei.“We have been very successful in convincing these governments to work with us to think about these types of threats to their future infrastructure,” Robert L. Strayer, the US State Department ambassador for cyber and international communications, told reporters.Strayer repeated US assertions that the security issues with Huawei centre around China's 2017 National Intelligence Law, which states that Chinese “organisations and citizens shall, in accordance with the law, support, cooperate with, and collaborate in national intelligence work.”Washington has made progress with its European allies due to a series of face-to-face on the sidelines of the congress, another US official said, adding that the issue would probably be managed on a case-by-case basis.“Europe very rarely speaks with a single voice, and I don't see this being a place where Europe is going to speak with a single voice either,” the official said.'Uphill battle'The worries about Huawei have already convinced some Western countries to bar or restrict the company's access to their markets, but Europe is split.The Czech Republic and Poland, where a Huawei executive was arrested on espionage charges in January, have voiced concerns, while Britain has said it can manage any risks.“We have to understand the opportunities and threats from China's technological offer,” Jeremy Fleming, head of Britain's GCHQ signals intelligence service, said this week.Intelligence and industry officials say the British conclusion has helped reassure a number of European governments, in part due to Britain's membership of the Five Eyes intelligence sharing group with the United States.Washington has seen the Mobile World Congress as an opportunity to counter that and sent a delegation to brief governments there, they said.Huawei responded by branding escalators and delegate lanyards with its red-fanned logo, and unveiling a new state-of-the-art folding smartphone in an effort to reassert its status as a leading technology giant.Paul Triolo, head of geo-technology at research firm Eurasia Group, said the United States faced “an uphill battle” convincing the telecoms industry to ditch Huawei.“That's a really hard case to make to industry which wants to hear about hard security concerns and wants to try to mitigate those,” he said. — Reuters [...]
Save
Prasarana beefs up security after brutal assault at MRT station
Rapid KL called on the public to be cautious and watchful over their personal safety, especially in public places and to avoid deserted routes or places. — Picture by Choo Choy May KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 18 — Closed-circuit television camera (CCTV) recordings inside lifts are now displayed directly to staff on duty as an extra precautionary measure following the recent snatch theft incident at the Taman Mutiara MRT station.Prasarana Malaysia Berhad (Prasarana) in a statement today informed that the images were pre-set on the main screen so that any incident could be viewed and known faster.“We have increased the number of Special Action Taskforce (SAT) members at the hotspot areas.The SAT team is a special unit set up by Prasarana’s security department and staff are dressed in plainclothes when on patrol duty,” the statement said.Rapid KL is working closely with the police in their investigations into the incident and the CCTV footage was handed over to the police on the morning of the incident, it said.Meanwhile, Rapid KL called on the public to be cautious and watchful over their personal safety, especially in public places and to avoid deserted routes or places.“Commuters using Rapid KL services may request to be escorted to the parking lot if the area is deserted,” the statement added.On Feb 14, a 48-year-old woman was punched and kicked several times when she was robbed in a lift at the Tamana Mutiara MRT in Cheras, at 6.45am.The victim who suffered bruises and injuries on the face, head, and body was taken to Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) by Prasarana auxiliary police personnel shortly after the incident. — Bernama [...]
Save